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Stories for October 16, 2007

What's Next for Al Gore After the Nobel Peace Prize?

Oct. 16
By Gloria Penner and KPBS Commentaries
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My Outlook inbox is crammed. Since Friday's announcement that former Vice President

Culture Lust by Angela Carone

Oct. 16
By Acarone and KPBS Public Broadcasting
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SoCal Home Sales Hit Two-Decade Low Last Month

Oct. 16
By Erik Anderson and KPBS Public Broadcasting
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The Southern California home sales slump continues to drag down the number of houses changing hands. Real Estate tracking company Dataquick reports home sales in the region's six counties hit a two-decade low last month.

Citizens Push For County Probe of CCDC Navy Broadway Project

Oct. 16
By Alison St John and KPBS Public Broadcasting
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A citizens' coalition wants the County Grand Jury to investigate the way San Diego's Center City Development Corporation is handling the Navy Broadway project on the Embarcadero. KPBS reporter Alison St John has more.

Lawmakers Struggling to Pass Water Storage Improvements

Oct. 16
By California Capitol Network, Marianne Russ and KPBS Public Broadcasting
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Tuesday is the deadline set by the Secretary of State for lawmakers to put a water bond on the February ballot. It will come and go without a deal -- but that doesn't mean everyone has given up just yet. From Sacramento, Marianne Russ explains.

New Law Aims to Reduce Plastic Marine Trash

Oct. 16
By Ed Joyce and KPBS Public Broadcasting
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Manufacturers will now be required to prevent tiny plastic pellets used in packaging from spilling into California waterways. KPBS reporter Ed Joyce has more on the bill signed by Governor Schwarzenegger.

Martha and Grant: Hey That's MINE!

Oct. 16
KPBS Public Broadcasting
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When you were a child and wanted to lay claim to something, what did you say? Did you call “dibs”? Or “hosey” it? A caller is curious about another verb used in such situations: “finnie.” Grant explains this word’s meaning and origin.

The Dean of USD's New School of Peace Studies Explains How to End Conflicts

Oct. 16
KPBS Public Broadcasting
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Between The War on Terror, The War in Iraq and civil wars across the globe one must ask: Is peace possible? The late philanthropist Joan B. Kroc thought so. She gave the University of San Diego $50 million to create the School of Peace Studies – a place for not just talking about peace, but actually making it. We'll ask the

After Spending More Than 17 Years on Death Row Innocent Man Does Not Want Revenge

Oct. 16
KPBS Public Broadcasting
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Imagine spending did almost 20 years on death row for a crime you not commit. That's exactly what happened to Juan Melendez. He tells us what went through his head during all those years, why he does not blame any single person for what happened to him and why he thinks he was locked-up in the first place.

Retracing the Roots of Aviation in San Diego

Oct. 16
KPBS Public Broadcasting
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Tease photo

From John J. Montgomery to Claude Ryan to Reuben H. Fleet, a new documentary explores San Diego's prominent place in the history of aviation. Why were adventure seekers and aviation entrepreneurs attracted to San Diego? Through interviews and archival photos, KPBS TV producer Pat Finn tells us how the aviation industry impacted our economy, our military and our national defense.

New Developments Drain the Local Water Supply

Oct. 16
KPBS Public Broadcasting
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Will Southern California have enough water in the future to quench the thirst of its rapidly growing population? State law says cities must show there is a sufficient water supply to serve new developments of 500 homes or more. We speak to reporter Amita Sharma about how local growth is impacting the water supply and how the laws regulating new development are being enforced in San Diego County.

Tales of A Working Mother: Too Hip for Their Minivans

Oct. 16
By Deanna Mackey and KPBS Commentaries
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If you follow parenting trends you may have heard about a Gen X and Y phenomenon called the

Michael Clayton

Oct. 16
By Beth Accomando and Cinema Junkie by Beth Accomando
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The film opens with the voice of a man urgently telling a story. It's an explanation of sorts and the meaning of which we won't fully appreciate until much later in the film. Similarly, a shot of a woman lawyer (Tilda Swinton) sweating profusely in a bathroom stall is initially unclear in its meaning. We also get a quick introduction of Michael Clayton (George Clooney), a lawyer who's been called in to "fix" a problem with a very rich and very important client who's just left the scene of a hit and run. Clayton has been described as a miracle worker, but he considers himself little more than a glorified janitor cleaning up other people's messes. But Clayton is about to find himself in the middle of a mess. We get a hint of the severity of that mess when his car blows up and he's nearly killed.

Harsh California Water Laws, but Lax Enforcement

Oct. 16
By Amita Sharma and KPBS Public Broadcasting
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Tease photo

California likes to brag it has some of the toughest laws on the books when it comes to making sure its people will not run out of water. But critics say the laws are poorly enforced, and the whole system is built on hope and trust. Reporter Amita Sharma has more.

KPBS Commentaries

Oct. 16
KPBS Public Broadcasting
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Cinema Junkie by Beth Accomando

Oct. 16
By Baccomando and KPBS Public Broadcasting
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The Assassination of Jesse James

Oct. 16
By Beth Accomando and Cinema Junkie by Beth Accomando
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Writer-director Andrew Dominik begins his meditation on the outlaw on an interesting note. There's an initial sense of poetry as a narrator paints a portrait of James (played by an initially golden Brad Pitt) against a backdrop of beautiful shots of the old west. The images are soft and out of focus on the periphery of the frame as if to warn us that what we are about to see is not a clear-sighted recounting of the facts but rather something filtered through memory or time. In these initial moments, there's even a hint of the kind of poetry that graced Terence Malick's