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Stories for February 19, 2008

Stuff White People Like

Feb. 19
By Angela Carone and Culture Lust by Angela Carone

http://stuffwhitepeoplelike.wordpress.com/2008/01/31/44-public-radio/#comment-862

Is PBS Still Necessary? A Response

Feb. 19
By Angela Carone and Culture Lust by Angela Carone

Like many of its competitors, the size of PBS' Prime Time average has been decreasing. This isn't news & ndash; if you read the trade papers, Madison Avenue has been wondering aloud why they still spend billions each year on advertising in front of commercial network audiences. Rather than comparing PBS' audience to other Prime Time network schedules (say Fox News, CNN, A&E, Discovery, or History) McGrath strangely offers "Friday Night Smackdown" as a comparison, in the same article he proposes that "quality" is out there. The combined viewing audience for all of the prime-time cable news channels is about 2.5 million. Only about one million more than PBS' single channel of evening programming. And why does he pass judgment on something as successful as FNS? Thanks for nothing, Charles.

Culture Lust by Angela Carone

Feb. 19
By Acarone and KPBS Public Broadcasting

The '90s, a Topless Bar and Libertarians in San Diego

Feb. 19
By Steven Garrett and Citizen Voices

Is this 1990? Really, is this 1990 all over again? Then why is Republican presidential frontrunner John McCain spouting off about

Culture Lust by Angela Carone

Feb. 19
By Acarone and KPBS Public Broadcasting

Citizen Voices

Feb. 19
By Sgarrett and KPBS Public Broadcasting

Calif. Senator Wants Schools Reimbursed for Beef Recall Losses

Feb. 19
By Jenny O'Mara and KPBS Public Broadcasting

A Democratic state Senator is taking action after the largest beef recall in history. Much of that meat went to California schools. Dean Florez says those districts should be reimbursed. From Sacramento, Jenny O'Mara reports.

Medi-Cal Program Could See Deeper Cuts

Feb. 19
By Kenny Goldberg and KPBS Public Broadcasting

More cuts could be on the way for the Medi-Cal program. State lawmakers have already approved a ten percent reduction in the rate Medi-Cal pays doctors. Now the governor wants lawmakers to consider some additional changes. KPBS Reporter Kenny Goldberg has more.

Special Ed. Activists Complain Lincoln High Not Suitable for Disabled Students

Feb. 19
By Ana Tintocalis and KPBS Public Broadcasting

Special education activists say the new Lincoln High School in South San Diego does not meet the needs of physically disabled students. They say the situation is causing a separate but unequal learning environment. KPBS Reporter Ana Tintocalis has the story.

5.0 Temblor Shakes California-Mexico Border as Swarm Continues

Feb. 19
KPBS Public Broadcasting

An estimated 5.0-magnitude earthquake centered in northern Baja California shook the U.S.-Mexico border region about 100 miles east of San Diego on Tuesday.

School Officials Mull Property Tax to Mitigate Budget Cuts

Feb. 19
By Ana Tintocalis and KPBS Public Broadcasting

San Diego Unified School District officials are looking into whether a school parcel tax would would be acceptable to voters in San Diego. A parcel tax is a property tax that pays for local public services. KPBS reporter Ana Tintocalis has the story.

1967 Best Picture Nominees Forecast a Revolution in Hollywood

Feb. 19
KPBS Public Broadcasting

The 80th Annual Academy Awards take place this Sunday and the movies nominated for Best Picture have beat out many good films from last year, but none of them signal a revolution brewing in Hollywood. It was a different story in 1968, according to entertainment writer Mark Harris.

‘Three Cups of Tea’ Author Talks Building Schools for Peace

Feb. 19
KPBS Public Broadcasting

Greg Mortenson, author of “Three Cups of Tea,” joins us to tell the story of his dangerous and difficult quest to build schools in the wildest parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Marines Face Courts-Martial Over Slaying of Iraqi Civilians

Feb. 19
KPBS Public Broadcasting

In November 2005, one U.S. Marine was killed and two were wounded following a bomb attack in Haditha, Iraq. Following the attack, Marines killed 24 civilians. Considered the worst attack on civilians to date in the war, some labeled the incident "Iraq's My Lai." In March, two Marines involved in the attacks will face courts-martial.

Scott Peters Discusses His Decision to Run for City Attorney

Feb. 19
KPBS Public Broadcasting

Why does San Diego City Council President Scott Peters want to run for City Attorney? We speak to Scott Peters about his decision to run for the office, the challenges associated with running against incumbent Mike Aguirre, and the City of San Diego's most pressing legal needs.

Contractor Gets 12 Years in Cunningham Bribery Case

Feb. 19
By Elliot Spagat and KPBS Public Broadcasting

A defense contractor was sentenced to 12 years in federal prison Tuesday for bribing former U.S. Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham with cash, meals, trips and other gifts in exchange for nearly $90 million in Pentagon work.

Legal Update: Congress, Roger Clemens, and Spygate

Feb. 19
KPBS Public Broadcasting

All-Star pitcher Roger Clemens squares off against his former trainer on Capitol Hill while New England Patriots coach Brian Belichick is under fire for videotaping opponents. These Days legal analyst Dan Eaton joins us to talk about Congress' investigations into professional sports.

SoCal Water Authority Takes Issue with Las Vegas Mayor's Comments

Feb. 19
KPBS Public Broadcasting

The head of a Southern California water agency called recent comments by the mayor of Las Vegas "ridiculous and inflammatory" and is vowing a fight to keep farmers' fields irrigated.

To Prolong Landfill Life, Recycling Mandatory for Large Buildings

Feb. 19
By Andrew Phelps and KPBS Public Broadcasting

Recycling is now mandatory for large apartment buildings and condo complexes in the city of San Diego. KPBS Reporter Andrew Phelps says it's just one more way to keep trash out of the landfill.

Growing Number of Parents Aren't Vaccinating Their Kids

Feb. 19
By Kenny Goldberg and KPBS Public Broadcasting
Tease photo

At least eleven children in San Diego County are infected with measles. The outbreak began last month, when an unvaccinated child returned from a family trip to Switzerland with the disease. Childhood vaccines have been hailed as one of the greatest public health achievements of the 20th century. But a growing number of parents just don’t think they’re safe. KPBS Health Reporter Kenny Goldberg has the story.

The Effect of Alzheimer's on the Brain

Feb. 19
By Andrew Phelps and KPBS Public Broadcasting

Alzheimer's disease was first diagnosed more than 100 years ago by German psychiatrist Alois Alzheimer. He followed the case of Auguste D, a 50 year-old woman with dementia. Dr. Alzheimer would ask her to write her name. Auguste would forget and repeat, "I have lost myself." Back then, Alzheimer's was believed to be a disease of the middle-aged. Today, it's considered a form of dementia - one associated with increasing age. Andrew Phelps explains how the disease affects the brain.

The Trouble with Alzheimer's

Feb. 19
By Joanne Faryon and Off Mic

This summer will mark my 20th anniversary as a reporter. It would seem that after two decades of doing the same thing, you wouldn't constantly be second-guessing yourself. But my most recent assignment was among the most troubling for me in a long time. I was working on a story about Alzheimer's disease. I didn't know a lot about it. I thought it affected very old people, made them forgetful, end of story. And then I met Carl Hopkins.

Off Mic

Feb. 19
KPBS Public Broadcasting