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Washington Week With Gwen Ifill And National Journal

Airs Fridays at 8 p.m. & Sundays at 10:30 a.m. on KPBS TV

Above: WASHINGTON WEEK features Washington's top journalists analyzing the week's top news stories and their effect on the lives of all Americans. Gwen Ifill (pictured) hosts.

WASHINGTON WEEK, PBS' longest-running public affairs series, features Washington's top journalists analyzing the week's top news stories and their effect on the lives of all Americans. Gwen Ifill hosts.

WASHINGTON WEEK Podcast

If you miss the program or want to hear it a second time, download the podcast and listen to both the show and the Webcast Extra.

Meet The Panelists

Get to know the panelists who join Gwen around the table each week.

16 For 2016

As Election 2016 approaches, we want to hear from you, the voters! WASHINGTON WEEK is proud to launch "16 for 2016" -- a national initiative to bring diverse points of view together to inform and engage voters.

Got 16 seconds to talk about your key issue? Upload your video! Got 16 thoughts about health care? Share your comment! Have you met any of the presidential candidates? Post your photos!

Or join the conversation on Twitter with #16for2016

Topics for Sept. 23 (Encore Sept. 25):

Just days before Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton square off in the first presidential debate, the 2016 campaign has once again turned its focus to national security following a series of weekend attacks that are being investigated as potential terrorism. Authorities say the suspect accused of planting bombs in New York and New Jersey that injured dozens was inspired by Osama bin Laden. ISIS has claimed responsibility for a stabbing attack at a Minnesota mall that injured ten people. Pierre Thomas of ABC News will report on the latest details of the investigations.

In the wake of the attacks, the Republican nominee renewed his support for racial profiling by police to prevent further incidents while Clinton said Trump’s comments have been used for "recruitment of terrorists." Jennifer Jacobs of Bloomberg News will explain what the candidates say they would do to prevent future terror attacks.

Trump and Clinton also offered competing proposals to change police-community relations after fatal shootings of African-American men by police officers in Tulsa, Oklahoma and Charlotte, North Carolina. Trump said he was "troubled" by the series of shootings, but he also renewed his support for controversial "stop and frisk" policies that allow police officers to stop people they think are suspicious. The New York businessman’s comments came as he spent much of the week trying to reach out to black voters and blamed President Obama’s leadership for African Americans being "in the worst shape they’ve ever been." Clinton called the recent shootings "intolerable" and said she would develop national standards for community policing. We’ll get more information on the candidates’ plan for improving police-community relations from Beth Reinhard of The Wall Street Journal.

The officer-involved shootings this week once again raises questions of how the candidates would reform the criminal justice system. Take a deep-dive into their proposals.

Elsewhere on the campaign trail this week, Trump faces new questions about whether he used his charitable foundation to pay for his personal business. His opponent courted millennial voters and proposed new job opportunities for Americans with disabilities. Both candidates are likely to face questions about these new proposals when they face off in their first debate on Monday. Ed O’Keefe of The Washington Post will report on how the candidates are preparing.

While both Trump and Clinton are preparing to take the debate stage on Monday, so, too, is the moderator. Gwen Ifill has some experience with debate moderating and offers some advice in her Take.

If you had the chance to ask a question on the debate stage, what would it be? See what swing-state voters told us and add your voice to the conversation.

And don’t forget you can follow WASHINGTON WEEK on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Twitter to keep up with daily developments. Past episodes of WASHINGTON WEEK are available for online viewing.

The debate over transparency on the campaign trail

After building his political brand questioning President Obama's birth certificate, Donald Trump declared Friday that Obama was "born in the United States." The new position came during a week when both presidential candidates faced questions of transparency. After Clinton was diagnosed with pneumonia, she and Trump released new details about their health.

Washington Week in Colorado: Trump, Clinton & Nat'l Security

Labor Day has come and gone, and the general election is in full swing. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump debated who would be a better commander in chief. In a back-to-back forum, the candidates discussed their plans for national security and attacked each other. They presented almost completely contrasting views on the military and veterans, and voters were able to directly compare them.

One Year After 9/11 Attacks - Part II

One year after the deadliest terror attack in American history, 18 Washington Week reporters came together to discuss how the attacks of September 11, 2001 changed the country. The attacks left nearly 3,000 Americans dead and led the country to war. As we reflect on September 11 fifteen years later, many of these questions still rest at the heart of our country.

One Year After 9/11 Attacks - Part I

One year after the deadliest terror attack in American history, 18 Washington Week reporters came together to discuss how the attacks of September 11, 2001 changed the country. As Gwen Ifill said, "many things got back to normal but a whole lot changed forever." One year later, many were still grappling with issues such as the birth and death of bipartisanship and expanded presidential power.

One Year After 9/11 Attacks - Part II

One year after the deadliest terror attack in American history, 18 Washington Week reporters came together to discuss how the attacks of September 11, 2001 changed the country. The attacks left nearly 3,000 Americans dead and led the country to war. As we reflect on September 11 fifteen years later, many of these questions still rest at the heart of our country.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton trade accusations of racism

The presidential race got personal this week as Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton exchanged insults. In an attempt to reach out to minority voters, Trump labeled Clinton a "bigot," while she shot back with some of his own past controversial statements. The Republican nominee also "softened" his immigration proposals including his plan for mass deportation of undocumented immigrants.

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Trump shakes up campaign staff and expresses "regret"

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump announced a major campaign shakeup as campaign chair Paul Manafort resigned and Breitbart's Steve Bannon and GOP pollster Kellyanne Conway stepped in. Trump also changed up his campaign tone by expressing "regret for some of his past statements. Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton faced new questions about her private email server and her family's foundation.

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Election 2016: Separating conventional from unconventional

Donald Trump sparked another firestorm this week with remarks about "Second Amendment people" preventing Hillary Clinton from appointing judges who would curb gun rights and claiming that President Obama was the "founder of ISIS." While Trump's rhetoric has some Republicans saying they won't vote for him, is his unconventional campaign catching on with voters?

GOP leaders concerned about Trump; Clinton's polling bounce

Republican Party leaders are growing increasingly concerned about Donald Trump's ability to win the White House after a difficult week for his campaign and his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton with a lead in most national polls. Trump's week has included a series of missteps that include an ongoing feud with a Gold Star family and suggesting the November election will be rigged.

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