Skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

Stories for November 18, 2009

4-Month-Old San Diego Baby Dies Of Swine Flu

Nov. 18, 2009
By Susan Murphy

A 4-month-old baby girl with no underlying medical conditions is the latest swine flu death in San Diego County, according to health officials. In all, 33 residents and four non-residents have died of swine flu since the outbreak began last April, and 617 have been hospitalized.

Swine Flu Vaccine Shortage Hampers School Vaccination Program

Nov. 18, 2009
By Tom Fudge

School-based flu vaccines in San Diego County are likely to be suspended this week because of a shortage of H1N1 vaccine.

Tease photo for story

San Diego's Dry Spell Continues

Nov. 18, 2009
By Ed Joyce / Capital Public Radio

San Diego has only received a trace of rain since July 1 and yearly rainfall is also below normal. National Weather Service forecasters don't expect significant rain anytime soon. San Diego's Lindbergh Field has received 3.10 inches of rain since January 1 which is 5.84 inches below normal for this time of year.

Tease photo for story

Conference Applies Conflict Resolution To Border Environment

Nov. 18, 2009

A conference called Greening Borders at University of San Diego hopes to look at U.S.-Mexico environmental issues in a new light. Organizers expect more than 100 people to attend.

California Faces Another Massive Deficit

Nov. 18, 2009
Associated Press

California will face a nearly $21 billion budget gap over the next year and a half, extending a fiscal crisis that already has led to steep cuts to public schools, social services and health programs.

UC Committee OKs Tuition Hike

Nov. 18, 2009
Associated Press

A regents committee has approved a 32 percent boost in student fees at University of California campuses, sending the proposal to the full board for review.

Tease photo for story

Calif. Teachers Unions, Parents Fearful Of More Education Cuts

Nov. 18, 2009
Steve Shadley, California Capitol Network

Teachers unions and some parents are worried more cuts for California public schools could be on the way. They’re concerned an upcoming Legislative Analyst Office report on the state budget will show that California is facing another multi-billion dollar cash shortage.

Tease photo for story

Why All The Vampires?

Nov. 18, 2009
By Angela Carone, Maureen Cavanaugh

This Friday marks the start of a new surge in the popularity of vampires. The latest movie installment of the "Twilight" series, based on Stephanie Meyer's popular books, opens in area theaters. "New Moon" now joins "True Blood," "Vampire Diaries," and "Cirque du Freak: The Vampire's Assistant" in feeding our seemingly endless fascination with vampires. We want to know why all the fuss about vampires.

Tease photo for story

San Diego County Clinics Run Out Of Swine Flu Vaccine

Nov. 18, 2009
By Susan Murphy

San Diego County has run out of its supply of swine flu vaccine, according to county health officials.

Tease photo for story

Guards Repel Pirate Attack On Maersk Alabama

Nov. 18, 2009
Associated Press

Somali pirates attacked the Maersk Alabama for the second time in seven months on Wednesday, but guards on board the U.S.-flagged cargo ship repelled the takeover attempt, the EU's naval force said.

Negotiating For Clean Water Along the Border

Nov. 18, 2009
By Maureen Cavanaugh, Natalie Walsh

The U.S. and Mexico continue to struggle over border issues like national security and pollution runoff. We discuss how interests on both sides of the border are working toward solving these problems.

Tease photo for story

What's In The New Downtown Library Design?

Nov. 18, 2009
By Maureen Cavanaugh, Pat Finn

The architect-designer of the new downtown central library explains what elements are included in the design: the tech center, the high-school, the city offices, the solar collectors.

Tease photo for story

UCSD Professor Finds Egyptian Mummies Had Clogged Arteries

Nov. 18, 2009
By Tom Fudge

A study by a clinical professor at UCSD shows that ancient Egyptian mummies had clogged arteries. This dispels the notion that arterial sclerosis is a modern disease. Cardiologist Michael Miyamoto says arterial sclerosis is strongly associated with the bad habits of modern Americans: things like smoking, fat consumption and sedentary lifestyles.

Tease photo for story

Does Twilight Sell Sex to Teens?

Nov. 18, 2009
By Beth Accomando

Unless you’ve been living under a cultural rock, you must be aware that “New Moon," the next installment of the wildly successful “Twilight Saga,” opens this Friday. The human-vampire romance expands to include a werewolf as Edward and Jacob vie for the attentions of Bella. But this teen bodice ripper maybe sending a mixed message with its sexy but chaste leads. I talk with some of my Teen Critics at Mount Miguel High School.