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Stories for October 15, 2009

S.D. City Departments Asked To Make Big Cuts

Oct. 15
By Katie Orr

All San Diego city departments are being asked to identify how they can cut 27 percent out of their discretionary budgets.

FRONTLINE: The Warning

Oct. 15
FRONTLINE: The Warning  Tease photo

In the devastating aftermath of the economic meltdown, FRONTLINE sifts the ashes for clues about why it happened and examines critical moments when it might have gone much differently. Looking back into the 1990s, producer/director Michael Kirk ("Inside the Meltdown," "Breaking the Bank") discovers early warnings of the crash, reveals an intense battle among high-ranking members of the Clinton administration and uncovers a concerted effort not to regulate the emerging, highly complex and lucrative derivatives markets, which would become the ticking time bomb within the American economy.

NOVA: Lizard Kings

Oct. 15
NOVA: Lizard Kings  Tease photo

Though they may look like dragons and inspire stories of man-eating, fire-spitting monsters with long claws, razor-sharp teeth and muscular, whip-like tails, these creatures are actually monitor lizards, the largest lizards to walk the planet. With their acute intelligence -- including the ability to plan ahead -- these lizards are a very different kind of reptile, blurring the line between reptiles and mammals. And even though these bizarre reptiles haven't changed all that much since the dinosaurs, they are a very successful species, versatile at adapting to all kinds of settings. "Lizard Kings" looks at what makes these tongued reptiles so similar to mammals and what has allowed them to become such unique survivors.

INDEPENDENT LENS: Herb And Dorothy

Oct. 15
INDEPENDENT LENS: Herb And Dorothy  Tease photo

He was a postal clerk, and she was a librarian. With their modest means, Herbert and Dorothy Vogel managed to build one of the most important contemporary art collections in history. In "Herb And Dorothy," filmmaker Megumi Sasaki looks at a couple whose passion and disciplines defied stereotypes and redefined what it means to be an art collector.

Dredging Continues In Tijuana River Valley

Oct. 15
San Diego Week
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San Diego can continue to dredge debris in the Tijuana River Valley. Thursday a judge rejected a temporary restraining order that would have stopped the project.

Masterpiece Mystery! Inspector Lewis, Series II: The Point Of Vanishing

Oct. 15
Masterpiece Mystery! Inspector Lewis, Series II: The Point Of Vanishing   Tease photo

The murder of a small-time criminal leads Lewis and Hathaway to a prominent Oxford don-turned-celebrity atheist, who years earlier had been the intended target of a botched murder attempt. Could these isolated incidents be connected? As the pair investigates further, they uncover a web of deceit and a case of mistaken identity that will lead them to their killer.

NATURE: Rhinoceros

Oct. 15
NATURE: Rhinoceros  Tease photo

Millions of rhinos once roamed the Earth. There were hundreds of species of all shapes and sizes. But today, the rhinoceros is one of the planet's rarest animals, with three of its species on the brink of extinction. The program follows a team of experts who are working to protect rhinos from poachers -- relocating them to better habitats and breeding them in captivity.

Swine Flu 6 Months Later: Relief, But Winter Looms

Oct. 15
San Diego Week
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It was six months ago that scientists discovered an ominous new flu virus, touching off fears of a catastrophic global outbreak that could cause people to drop dead in the streets. Doomsday, of course, never came to pass.

Culture Lust Weekend: Yo La Tengo, Federico Aubele and DePedro, Wild Things

Oct. 15
By Angela Carone
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This weekend could start a little early with Buenos Aires singer Federico Aubele playing at the Belly Up tonight, or a cross-border art opening at UCSD, or a book signing at Warwick's. And that's only Thursday! Culture Lust has a truly lustable list of options for your culture-filled weekend.

San Diego's Sense Of Style On View In Balboa Park

Oct. 15
These Days
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40 historical, high-fashion costumes worn by San Diego women from the late 19th century to the present are showcased at the Museum of San Diego History's "San Diego style" exhibit to honor the 20th anniversary of the museum's Costume Council. The SDHS's costume collection (7,000 pieces) is the state's second-largest.

Balloon Boy Found Alive

Oct. 15
Associated Press
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A 6-year-old Colorado boy feared to have floated off in a helium balloon has been found safe at his home, hiding in a cardboard box in the garage attic.

Learning Empathy From Apes

Oct. 15
These Days

Are humans and other animals predisposed to take care of each other? We'll talk with noted psychologist Frans de Waal about his latest book "The Age of Empathy."

San Diego Asian Film Festival Launches 15 Days Of Films

Oct. 15
These Days

The San Diego Asian Film Festival is one of the largest exhibitions of Asian international and Asian American cinema in North America. Along with narrative features, the festival also showcases documentaries, short films, and animation. We'll talk with the festival's executive director about what's being offered this year, and with actress Jodi Long, whose documentary "Long Story Short" is screening at the festival.

Tracy Letts' "Man From Nebraska" At Cygnet Theatre

Oct. 15
These Days
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Pulitzer prize-winning playwright Tracy Letts' play "Man From Nebraska," tells the story of insurance salesman Ken Carpenter, who wakes up from his routine-oriented life to discover he no longer believes in God. This crisis of meaning takes him from Nebraska to London and the world of the British counter-culture. Cygnet Theatre's "Man from Nebraska" is directed by Francis Gercke and stars Monique Gaffney as a British waitress.

Social Security: No Cost Of Living Increase Next Year

Oct. 15
Associated Press
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There will be no cost of living increase for more than 50 million Social Security recipients next year, the first year without a raise since automatic adjustments were adopted in 1975, the government announced Thursday.