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Tavis Smiley Reports: Dudamel: Conducting A Life

Airs Friday, August 31, 2012 at 10:30 p.m. on KPBS TV

Above: Promotional photo of Los Angeles Philharmonic's charismatic conductor, Gustavo Dudamel

In "Dudamel: Conducting A Life," Tavis Smiley gives viewers an extraordinary look into the life and artistry of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's charismatic conductor.

LA Phil’s charismatic conductor, Gustavo Dudamel with host Tavis Smiley
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Above: LA Phil’s charismatic conductor, Gustavo Dudamel with host Tavis Smiley

Tavis Smiley (center) visited the Conservatory Lab Charter School in Boston, and got an earful from two young students – Mark Anthony Cazir (left) and Stella Dzialas (right) – who love music and the instruments that they play.
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Above: Tavis Smiley (center) visited the Conservatory Lab Charter School in Boston, and got an earful from two young students – Mark Anthony Cazir (left) and Stella Dzialas (right) – who love music and the instruments that they play.

At 29, Gustavo Dudamel is not only the youngest conductor of any major orchestra in the world, but is also being hailed by critics as the most exciting.

Dudamel is instrumental in inspiring the launch of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's Youth Orchestra Los Angeles initiative, which provides Los Angeles school children with music education.

A student of an internationally acclaimed music program in his native Venezuela, Dudamel is committed to expanding music education in America.

Tavis profiles some of the remarkable kids whose lives are being transformed by Dudamel’s commitment to free music education for all.

Original air date: December 29, 2010

Gustavo Dudamel is on Facebook, and you can follow @GustavoDudamel on Twitter. Tavis Smiley is on Facebook, and you can follow @tavissmiley on Twitter.

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Tavis Smiley Reports: Dudamel: Conducting A Life

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Watch Dudamel: Conducting a Life on PBS. See more from Tavis Smiley.

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Young Musicians Talk Instruments

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Watch Tavis with Stella and MarkAnthony- TSR web exclusive on PBS. See more from Tavis Smiley.

Above: What happens when you get children excited about music at an early age? They think learning and playing music is fun. When Tavis visited the Conservatory Lab Charter School in Boston, he got an earful from two young students – Stella Dzialas and Mark Anthony Cazir – who love music and the instruments that they play. Dzialas even shared that, in a matter of weeks, she learned to play “When the Saints Go Marching In.”

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Dudamel on Classical Music

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Watch Conversation with Gustavo Dudamel - clip on PBS. See more from Tavis Smiley.

Above: Los Angeles Philharmonic star conductor, Gustavo Dudamel, explains why classical music has the power to unite people.

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What Does a Conductor Do?

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Watch What does a conductor do? on PBS. See more from Tavis Smiley.

Above: Many have witnessed the brilliance of an orchestra conductor, standing before the symphony, holding a baton and directing the performance of some of classical music’s most difficult pieces. But he or she does not play an instrument during the performance, and, in fact, doesn’t make a sound. So, what does a conductor actually do? A lot, according to Los Angeles Philharmonic trumpeter Chris Still. In this video, Still explains the role of a conductor and why that person is vital to the performance.

Comments

Avatar for user 'bandman39'

bandman39 | December 30, 2010 at 4:39 p.m. ― 3 years, 11 months ago

This is one of the best programs ever presented on KPBS-TV...but shown at 11 PM and 4 AM...? Maybe this is WHY the people are so ill-informed about this topic.
This program offers some real reform to education and has proven over and over that it works..but the first to be eliminated by bean counting, bullies that overlook the value of music to every individual, not just the talented few!

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