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SPECIAL COVERAGE: Living With Wildfires: San Diego Firestorm 10 Years Later

City Of San Diego Will Not Put Sales Tax Increase On November Ballot

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A plan to put a half-cent sales tax increase on the City of San Diego November ballot has died. Several city council members said they were not happy with the idea of asking for a half-cent sales tax increase, but most of them said they were willing to put it on the ballot to let the public decide.

A plan to put a half-cent sales tax increase on the City of San Diego November ballot has died. Several city council members said they were not happy with the idea of asking for a half-cent sales tax increase, but most of them said they were willing to put it on the ballot to let the public decide.

It was not until Councilwoman Donna Frye showed her hand at the end of a long day of public testimony that it became apparent the measure would not get enough support to even make it to the ballot.

Frye explained that, ever since she got elected, she has said she would be willing to support a sales tax increase only under certain conditions.

“Is it part of a comprehensive plan that I can look at you and tell you it solves the problem?” Frye asked “And the answer is no… I can’t. If you come back with an ordinance tomorrow, you will not have my vote to place it on the ballot.”

Councilmen Carl Demaio and Kevin Faulconer rallied earlier in the day to call for pension reform and managed competition before asking citizens to pay more taxes.

City police and firefighter union leaders also spoke out. They said they have already made pension concessions and citizens should have a chance to decide if they want to see more cuts to public services.

City Council President Ben Hueso wrapped up the issue by saying that even though the sales tax increase would have raised an estimated $100 million a year in revenue for seven years, it would not have been enough to solve the city’s long term fiscal problems.

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