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Plan For Chula Vista Bay Front Project Approved

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Aired 5/18/10

The San Diego Port Commission and Chula Vista City Council have approved a Master Plan that would transform 550 acres of bay front land in the South Bay. Chula Vista City Hall was packed for the public hearing, which represented the culmination of years of negotiation and compromise.

— The San Diego Port Commission and Chula Vista City Council have approved a Master Plan that would transform 550 acres of bay front land in the South Bay.

There was a joint meeting of the San Diego Port District and the City Council of Chula Vista, to approve the environmental impact report of the Chula Vista Bayfront Master Plan on May 18, 2010. 
The 550 acre Bayfront plan includes 230 acres of public parks and open space as well as as hotels, condominiums and commercial space. It is projected to generate 11 million a year in tax revenues.
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Above: There was a joint meeting of the San Diego Port District and the City Council of Chula Vista, to approve the environmental impact report of the Chula Vista Bayfront Master Plan on May 18, 2010. The 550 acre Bayfront plan includes 230 acres of public parks and open space as well as as hotels, condominiums and commercial space. It is projected to generate 11 million a year in tax revenues.

Chula Vista City Hall was packed for the public hearing, which represented the culmination of years of negotiation and compromise. The Master Plan had the support of the environmental community and labor groups, as well as the Chamber of Commerce and the business community.

The plan includes three new hotels and a resort, condominiums, shops and restaurants. But it also has more than 200 acres of open space and public parks.

The Chula Vista Nature Center and a National Wildlife Refuge will be protected by a buffer zone, and the densest development will happen around the existing Marina and further south.

Some Chula Vista residents were still worried the proposed development would deny them access to the bay. But most of those testifying were in favor of the plan to maximize the potential of one of the last undeveloped portions of San Diego Bay.

The plan will still need the go ahead from the California Coastal Commission next year. But the agreements already hammered out with stakeholders mean there will likely be less opposition than there was for the City of San Diego’s North Embarcadero Plan. That plan was rejected by the Coastal Commission last month and has gone back to the drawing board.

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