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Five-Term Incumbent Loses School Board Race

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Aired 11/3/10

Scott Barnett beat five-term incumbent John de Beck for the San Diego Unified School District C school board seat. Barnett is a former executive director of the San Diego County Taxpayers Association.

— Scott Barnett edged five-term incumbent John de Beck for the San Diego Unified School District C school board seat. Barnett is a former executive director of the San Diego County Taxpayers Association.

Special Feature ELECTION RESULTS 2010

November 2010 Election Results

In the other contested school-board seat, math teacher Kevin Beiser defeated businessman Stephen Rosen.

John deBeck, known for his gruff, no-nonsense personality, had served 20 years. He drew 49 percent of the vote compared with Barnett's 50 percent.

"The status quo isn't going to work anymore," Barnett said. "I respect the fact that Mr. deBeck has given 20 years of his life to this board. We should thank him. But (voters) decided it was time for a change."

John deBeck was criticized for wasting board time by proposing reform ideas that get little traction. For example, he proposed an across-the-board salary cut to save the district money. He said at least he's coming up with some solutions.

John deBeck was no longer backed by the teachers union because he has supported layoffs in the past.

Scott Barnett has been involved with local politics for several years.

Barnett said his goal would be to overhaul the way the district analyzes and spends taxpayer money.

The San Diego teachers union recently pulled their support from Barnett because he didn't back a parcel tax on the November ballot. That tax could bring extra taxpayer dollars into the school district.

Kevin Beiser won the race for the District B seat on the San Diego board with 57 percent of the vote over Steve Rosen. Votes for incumbent Katherine Nakamura, a write-in candidate, have yet to be counted, but clearly were very few.

"Instead of looking to divide people," Beiser said, "we have to look to bring people together, collaborate -- especially on the budget committee."

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