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Julia Child: Cooking With Master Chefs: Charles Palmer

Airs Saturday, July 14, 2012 at 3:30 p.m. on KPBS TV

Above: Chef Charlie Palmer, Aureole New York Kitchen

Julia Child
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Above: Julia Child

Celebrate Julia Child’s 100th Birthday

Join us in celebrating her 100th birthday all Summer. Cook a recipe in August, watch never before streamed episodes of her classic shows, read tributes from celebrity chefs, and more. Bon appetit!

In COOKING WITH MASTER CHEFS, Julia Child visits sixteen nationally acclaimed master chefs in their own kitchens. Each chef demonstrates distinct techniques, regional recipes, and culinary tips which guide home cooks through their favorite recipes.

Expertly preparing each dish and teaching with passion along the way, the master chefs offer the viewer a unique and inspirational learning experience.

"Charles Palmer" - Chef Charles Palmer grew up in upstate New York and owns Aureole restaurant in New York City, among others. In this episode from his home kitchen, Palmer shares his expertise with wild game and prepares Pepper Seared Venison Steaks with Pinot Noir and Sun-Dried Cherries, Herb Potato Maximes, and a Warm Chocolate Tarragon Cake.

About Chef Palmer:

Since the beginning of his celebrated career, master chef and hospitality entrepreneur Charlie Palmer has received critical acclaim for his signature Progressive American Cuisine, a style built on rambunctious flavors and unexpected combinations with a deep and lasting infusion of classical French technique.

Influenced by his childhood experiences working in his family's vegetable garden, Palmer was an early advocate of farm over factory food. In 1988, he made a landmark commitment to creating dishes featuring regional American ingredients at his sublime three-star Aureole, once situated in a historic town house off Manhattan's Madison Avenue. Today Palmer's flagship Aureole is strategically located within New York City mid-town's dramatically modern Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park.

Over the years, Palmer combined his creative cooking spirit and flair for business to open thirteen notable restaurants across the country, a growing collection of food-forward wine shops and award-winning boutique hotels. But even today, the chef still steps in the kitchen with reinvention on his mind. "Without a doubt, people eat with their eye long before they put fork to food, so I continue to look for a playful yet respectful way to create excitement on the plate."

A frequent guest on NBC's "Today Show," Charlie Palmer is also the author of four cookbooks, "Great American Food" (Random House/1996), "Charlie Palmer's Casual Cooking" (Harper Collins/2001), "The Art of Aureole," (Ten Speed Press/2002), and "Charlie Palmer's Practical Guide to the New American Kitchen" (Melcher Media/2006).

Visit Charlie's outdoor cooking blog for recipes, tips, methods of cooking in the outdoors. Charlie Palmer is on Facebook, and you can follow @CharliePalmerGP on Twitter.

Video

Julia Child: Cooking With Master Chefs: Charles Palmer

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Watch Charles Palmer on PBS. See more from Julia Child: Cooking With Master Chefs.

Above: In this episode from his home kitchen, chef Charles Palmer shares his expertise with wild game and prepares Pepper Seared Venison Steaks with Pinot Noir and Sun-Dried Cherries, Herb Potato Maximes, and a Warm Chocolate Tarragon Cake.

Video

PBS Remembers: Julia Child

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Watch PBS Remembers on PBS. See more from PBS Food.

Above: "Julia Child's legacy to America is felt nowhere more strongly than at PBS," said Pat Mitchell, former President and CEO of PBS. "When it all began on WGBH, Boston's public television station, in 1962, no one had ever done a cooking show on television. But Julia set a standard for far more than a genre that has grown exponentially ever since. She made sophisticated cooking techniques accessible while promoting the art of cooking to men and women alike. She was a funny, witty and debonair character who charmed all who knew her - even if just by her television appearances. We're honored to have had her as part of the PBS family and we will cherish her memory."

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