skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

GOP State Budget Proposal: No New Taxes, No Education Cuts

Republican state lawmakers unveil their budget proposal. From left: Senate Budget Committee Vice-Chair Bill Emmerson, Senate GOP Leader Bob Huff, Assembly GOP Leader Connie Conway, Assembly Budget Committee Vice-Chair Jim Nielsen.

CCN

Above: Republican state lawmakers unveil their budget proposal. From left: Senate Budget Committee Vice-Chair Bill Emmerson, Senate GOP Leader Bob Huff, Assembly GOP Leader Connie Conway, Assembly Budget Committee Vice-Chair Jim Nielsen.

Aired 3/29/12 on KPBS News.

Republicans in the California legislature say they can balance the state budget without raising taxes or cutting education.

Republicans in the California legislature say they can balance the state budget without raising taxes or cutting education.

They unveiled their own budget proposal today. Assembly Minority Leader Connie Conway says it offers a third alternative to Governor Jerry Brown’s tax measure and his proposed trigger cuts to schools if that measure fails. “We are responding to the taxpayers’ priorities. At the same time, we believe we are offering some great solutions. I only hope our friends across the aisle take a few minutes to pay attention to that," said Conway.

The GOP plan starts with the cuts proposed in the governor’s January budget. It then relies on mostly one-time savings, such as a billion dollars in leftover redevelopment funds currently earmarked for affordable housing projects and $1.3 billion in unspent Proposition 63 money intended for mental health programs.

Other Republican cuts would include state worker savings equivalent to one furlough day a month and additional cuts to In-Home Supportive Services.

Comments

Avatar for user 'HarryStreet'

HarryStreet | April 3, 2012 at 9:34 a.m. ― 2 years, 6 months ago

We can still save a bundle with cutting back on overtime and pension benefits for fire & police dept's. There's also cutbacks that can be taken in pensions for city officials. Put that money toward education and see what happens.

( | suggest removal )

Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | April 3, 2012 at 11:37 a.m. ― 2 years, 6 months ago

How about the over-bloated prison-industrial complex?

Neither party ever talks about this, and it's a significant burden on our state's budget.

Spending on prisons and the prison-industrial complex in general has grown year after year in California, even during recession and budget crisis times.

In fact, in the last decade spending on prisons has overtaken spending on public higher education in California.

Our state, like the rest of the United States, is a police state.

**We imprison more people per capita than any other nation on earth.**

**We imprison a higher percentage of our population than:**

Iran
China
North Korea
Russia

And every other nation on this planet.

Yet, our crime rates are no better.

**The system is broken, we are a police country, and California is police state, and the horrendous amounts of money being sucked into this is compromising our education, innovation, and our standing as the world's hegemon.**

I thought is was pretty telling yesterday when the President of Mexico, in a joint conference with the U.S. and Canada, was asked about violence in Mexico and pointed out that U.S. cities like Washington DC have higher murder rates than large cities in Mexico.

When the hell are we going to see **SOMEONE** in Sacramento or Washington DC - Republican **OR** Democrat - actually talk about **REDUCING** the prison-industrial complex instead of continuing to feed the pig?!

When is the last time you ever heard a politician from any stripe say publicly, "statistics show we don't reep enough bennefits from imprisoning so many people, how about we **close** a few prisons instead of continually building more???????

( | suggest removal )