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Stories for November 16, 2012

Post-Petraeus, Net Privacy Backers Hope For A Boost

Nov. 16
Martin Kaste / NPR

The tech industry has been lobbying hard for an update to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the 1986 law governing online privacy.

EPA Puts New Limits On Arizona Coal Plants

Nov. 16
By Laurel Morales

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has imposed new pollution limits on three coal-fired Arizona power plants, aiming to protect the environment and air quality for wilderness areas and landmarks such as the Grand Canyon. The decision goes farther than the state’s plan and could force plants to shut down.

Announcement Planned On US-Mexico Water Agreement

Nov. 16
KEN RITTER, Associated Press

Government officials from United States and Mexico have set a Tuesday date in San Diego to sign a landmark agreement to share Colorado River water during times of drought and surplus.

California's October Jobs Report Surprisingly Strong

Nov. 16
Ben Adler, California Capitol Network

October was a very strong month for the California economy. The state’s Employment Development Department says California added nearly 46,000 jobs last month and the unemployment rate dropped a tenth of a point to 10.1 percent.

Bike Sharing To Come To San Diego Next Year

Nov. 16
By Tom Fudge and City News Service
Tease photo

San Diego officials today announced that Miami-based DecoBike was selected as the operating partner for a proposed bikeshare program, expected to begin next year.

Research Vessel ‘Roger Revelle’ Returns Home After Six Years At Sea

Nov. 16
By Tom Fudge
Tease photo

Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s research vessel is back in San Diego Bay following six years of scientific research around the globe.

Post-Petreaus, Net Privacy Backers Hope For A Boost

Nov. 16
Martin Kaste / NPR

The tech industry has been lobbying hard for an update to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the 1986 law governing online privacy.

Seaside After Sandy: Is Rebuilding Worth It?

Nov. 16
Jim Zarroli / NPR

Ever since Hurricane Sandy ripped through the New Jersey coast, some of the hardest-hit towns have been closed altogether. Authorities say gas leaks and unstable buildings have made them too risky to visit.

Latino Vote 2012: How Nevada, Arizona Boosted Voter Turnout

Nov. 16
By Jude Joffe-Block, Veronica Zaragovia
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A look at the different impact of the Latino vote in two neighboring states.

Florida Judge Denies Call For Recount, But Allen West Continues Quest

Nov. 16
Liz Halloran / NPR

A Florida judge on Friday denied Republican Rep. Allen West's last-ditch bid for a recount of early voting ballots in the close and ugly re-election race he is losing to Democrat Patrick Murphy.

This Is How Diabetes Swept The Nation

Nov. 16
Andrew Prince, Scott Hensley

When it comes to diabetes, just about everyone has heard there's an epidemic upon us.

EPA Says Its Ethanol Rules Aren't Driving Up Food Prices

Nov. 16
Dan Charles / NPR

The ethanol industry is happy with the Environmental Protection Agency today. If you're worried about the price of meat, though, you may not be so pleased.

Beer, Wine And Spirits: When Counting Our Liquid Calories, Are We Honest?

Nov. 16
NPR

When it comes to tallying our liquid calories, we're not always so accurate. Does that tiny 5-ounce serving of wine really count as a glass of wine? (The answer is yes.)

FHA Announces Moves Designed To Avoid Taxpayer Bailout

Nov. 16
Eyder Peralta / NPR

The Federal Housing Administration is on track to run out of money next September and may need a taxpayer bailout, an audit released today found.

Race To Be Young's Replacement Taking Shape

Nov. 16
By Katie Orr
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The race to replace outgoing San Diego City Council President Tony Young is already taking shape. Young is resigning to become CEO of the local chapter of the American Red Cross. KPBS has details on one potential candidate.

Immigration Detention Centers Called Gulags

Nov. 16
By David Martin Davies

A number of United States immigration detention centers are in such bad condition that they need to be shut down, according to a new report from the Detention Watch Network.

Roundtable: Border Agent Shooting; SD Economy Improving; Salk Fundraising; La Jolla Cove Stinking

Nov. 16
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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More information surfaces about the checkered career of a Border Patrol agent who shot a mother of five; the San Diego economy is looking up; the Salk Institute needs research funds; and birds are stinking up La Jolla Cove.

Medal Of Honor Recipient Urges Businesses To Hire Vets

Nov. 16
Teri Moon Cronk
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The Marine Corps’ first living Medal of Honor recipient from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars told a gathering of U.S. business leaders here yesterday that hiring veterans is a mutually beneficial practice. Dakota Meyer was a keynote speaker at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s fifth annual “Business Steps Up: Hiring Our Heroes” event.

Texas Legislature To Review DPS Shooting Policy

Nov. 16
By John Rosman
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During the next Texas state legislative session, an oversight committee will review the policy allowing Texas Department of Public Safety to shoot from helicopters.

Brian Bilbray Concedes In 52nd Congressional Race

Nov. 16
By Susan Murphy and City News Service
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Rep. Brian Bilbray, R-Solana Beach, conceded defeat today to Democratic San Diego Port Commissioner Scott Peters in the close race for the 52nd Congressional District.

California Says Human Trafficking Is Spreading

Nov. 16
Elliot Spagat, Associated Press
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The number of people identified as victims of human trafficking in California has increased steadily since 2010 as the crime has become a growing threat, authorities reported Friday.

Twinkies' Hostess Brand May Die, But The Iconic Snack Cakes Never Will

Nov. 16
April Fulton / NPR

The Hostess brand, home of the Twinkie, Sno Ball, Ding Dong, and those fun cupcakes with the swirly lines on top and filling in the middle, is shutting down, as our colleagues over at The Two-Way blog report. The purveyor of iconic calorie-rich but nutrient-poor snacks says a labor dispute has forced it to go out of business.

Research Vessel Roger Revelle Returns After 6-Year Journey

Nov. 16
City News Service

The research vessel Roger Revelle is set to return to San Diego around noon today following a six-year voyage around the globe that included work stretching from deep ocean trenches to the upper atmosphere.

Gulf Rig Fire: 4 In Hospital, 2 May Be Missing

Nov. 16
Associated Press
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Coast Guard officials said an oil rig exploded off the coast of Louisiana, sending four people to hospitals Friday. Two others were believed to be missing.

Palestinian Rocket Aimed At Jerusalem For 1st Time

Nov. 16
Associated Press
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Palestinian militants fired a rocket aimed at Jerusalem on Friday, setting off air raid sirens throughout the city and opening a new front in three days of fierce fighting between Israel and armed groups in the Gaza Strip.

Hidden Housing Subsidy May Soon Come Out Of Hiding

Nov. 16
Jacob Goldstein / NPR

The federal government has all these ways of paying people to buy houses without actually, you know, paying people to buy houses.

Fiscal Cliff Talks Get Started

Nov. 16
Mark Memmott / NPR
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President Obama and congressional leaders from both major parties are meeting at the White House this hour for the first of what will likely be many negotiations aimed at averting a plunge over the so-called fiscal cliff.

Fiscal Cliff Talks Get Started; Two Sides Sound Optimistic

Nov. 16
Mark Memmott / NPR
Tease photo

President Obama and congressional leaders from both major parties met at the White House this morning for the first of what will likely be many negotiations aimed at averting a plunge over the so-called fiscal cliff.

Train Kills Four Wounded Veterans In Texas Parade (Video)

Nov. 16
By Beth Ford Roth

A train hit and killed four wounded veterans and injured at least 16 others during a parade in West Texas on Thursday.

Can A Lame-Duck Congress Save The Day?

Nov. 16
Scott Neuman / NPR
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As the lame ducks waddle up to Capitol Hill for the final few weeks of this Congress, some political observers are hoping they will bring the "Spirit of 2010" with them.

Review: 'Lincoln'

Nov. 16
By Nathan John
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In the wake of the presidential election, "Lincoln" reminds us what we're really voting for -- main characters of potentially awesome non-fiction cinema. The film opens in San Diego Nov. 16.

New System To Restore Power To San Diego Utility Customers Faster

Nov. 16
By Dwane Brown
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San Diego Gas and Electric has launched a new system to quickly respond to power outages and restore customers' electricity faster than ever before.

Preview: San Diego Arab Film Festival

Nov. 16
By Beth Accomando
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Tonight and tomorrow, San Diego will play host to its first Arab Film Festival (November 16 and 17 at the Museum of Photographic Arts) -- which includes a film addressing elements of the ongoing violence between Arabs and Israelis in Gaza.

In California, 'Republican' Is Becoming A Toxic Label

Nov. 16
Ina Jaffe / NPR
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If the election results were disappointing for Republicans nationally, they were devastating for the GOP in California.

Want To Help Sandy Victims? Send Cash, Not Clothes

Nov. 16
Pam Fessler / NPR
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Whenever there's a disaster, people want to give, and Hurricane Sandy is no exception. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy, U.S. charities collected more than $174 million in donations as of Nov. 9 to help respond to the storm.