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Stories for April 10, 2013

Paris Judge To Decide Legality Of Hopi Artifact Sale

April 10
By Laurel Morales
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Northern Arizona tribes are following news of a Paris auction house that wants to put 70 artifacts sacred to the Hopi people up for sale. A hearing Thursday will determine the legality of the sale.

Evacuations During Nuclear Emergency May Cause Gridlock, Report Reveals

April 10
By Susan Murphy
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Evacuations during a nuclear emergency at San Onofre may not go as planned. A new government report reveals people fleeing in fear outside of the evacuation zone could cause gridlock.

Intergenerational Games Bring All Ages Together

April 10
By Dwane Brown
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The Intergenerational Games, put on by the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency for the past 10 years, bring members of multiple generations together by joining them up and pitting them against each other.

Michelle Obama Steps Into Gun Control Debate

April 10
Cheryl Corley / NPR
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First lady Michelle Obama gave a personal and emotional speech Wednesday in Chicago as she stepped into the debate over gun control.

President's Budget Requests Border Expansion Funding

April 10
By Adrian Florido
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Nearly $300 million of the federal budget would go to expand border crossings in San Diego and Laredo, Texas.

El Paso Schools Cheating Scandal Probes Officials' Accountability

April 10
Claudio Sanchez / NPR
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No one knows if Atlanta's school superintendent or any of the people accused of falsifying test results will go to jail, but they wouldn't be the first if they do.

Cities Turn Sewage Into 'Black Gold' For Local Farms

April 10
Frank Morris / NPR
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On a normal day, Kansas City, Mo., processes more than 70 million gallons of raw sewage. This sewage used to be a nuisance, but Kansas City, and a lot of municipalities around the country, are now turning it into a resource for city farmers hard up for fertilizer.

Frank Meeink: Transforming Hate

April 10
By Monica Medina, Ashley Rodriguez
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What does evil look like? Just ask Frank Meeink, who became a skinhead at age 13, and spent years struggling with the demons inside him—the ones that caused him to pick fights for no reason, sometimes beating his victims senseless. It took incarceration to help him turn his life around, a life that was captured in the film, American History X.

Some States Hike Gas Tax; Va. Tries New Route To Fund Roads

April 10
Brian Naylor / NPR
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It's no secret that many of the nation's roads are in pretty bad shape. In the latest report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the condition of America's highways rated a grade of D.

A Mother's Fight Against 3 Strikes Law 'A Way of Life'

April 10
Ina Jaffe / NPR

Since the November election, 240 California prisoners facing potential life sentences have been set free. That's because voters changed California's tough three strikes sentencing law.

Do Physical Compliments Have A Place In Politics?

April 10
Michel Martin / NPR
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Do you mind if I say this? You look great. The hair is on point. I love the way that shirt goes with that sweater. And, no, that's not the only thing I care about about you. But, yes, I do appreciate a good looking....whoever you are. And now that I think about it, whoever you are, it would be great if we could all just admit that that how you feel about what I just said well, it depends. It depends on who you are, what you do and, yes, how badly you need or want that compliment.

American Tribe Fights To Halt Artifact Auction In Paris

April 10
Tanya Ballard Brown / NPR
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An auction of sacred Native American artifacts scheduled for Friday in Paris is stirring up controversy on both sides of the Atlantic

San Diego Crime Rates Edge Up, Report Shows

April 10
Betsy Galchutt

Crime rates in San Diego rose last year, reversing a positive trend.

Quadruple Amputee Travis Mills Celebrates His 'Alive Day' (Video)

April 10
By Beth Ford Roth
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It was on April 10, 2012 that Army Sgt. Travis Mills stepped on an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan and lost all four limbs. Today Mills and his family are celebrating his "Alive Day" - along with the release of the trailer for a documentary about his life.

San Diegans And Distracted Driving

April 10
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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Driving while talking on a hand-held cellphone is against the law in California, but according to a new survey from UC San Diego researchers, many San Diegans are still using their mobile devices. Adults driving with young children also report texting and talking on their hand-held phone while behind the wheel.

Cancer Play Is Reality Theatre

April 10
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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A performance piece at San Diego Lyceum Theatre explores how we talk with friends and family about cancer. "The Cancer Play" is based on real conversations among a family navigating a devastating diagnosis.

Busy Week For Immigrant Rights Activist In San Diego

April 10
Midday Edition
Evening Edition

Local activist are holding rallies, marches and a hunger strike to push for comprehensive immigration reform.

Stone Brewing Company Ranks High in Sales Volume

April 10
City News Service

San Diego's Stone Brewing Co. ranks 10th in sales volume, according to nationwide ranking released today by a trade group.

Live From The Artists Den: Rufus Wainwright

April 10
Live From The Artists Den: Rufus Wainwright  Tease photo

“Candles” is the closing song on Rufus Wainwright’s acclaimed new album, "Out of the Game," but it was the perfect opener at his performance at the magnificent Church of the Ascension, on Manhattan’s lower Fifth Avenue. The historic church was a breathtaking backdrop for the gorgeous tale of searching for a place to light a memorial for his late mother, singer Kate McGarrigle.

SD Unified Approves Free Bus Passes For Low-Income Students

April 10
By Megan Burks
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The school board voted Tuesday to help launch a pilot program that will provide free bus passes for low-income students at four area high schools.

Quail Brush Requests Suspension of Application for Power Plant Near Santee

April 10
Steven Bartholow / Santee Patch

The company behind the Quail Brush Power Project has requested a 12-month suspension of their application to build a gas burning power plant near Santee.

Home Prices up 15 Percent in First Quarter

April 10

SAN DIEGO (CNS) - The median price of single-family homes in San Diego County rose 5 in percent March to $432,000, and the first-quarter median price was up 15 percent compared to the same quarter in 2012.

Joan Crawford: Always The Star

April 10
Joan Crawford: Always The Star  Tease photo

This glamorous and hugely popular actress raised herself from brutal poverty to Academy Award-winning stardom through guts, determination and hard work. During her 50-year career, she made more than 80 films. But her obsessive perfectionism led to a later caricature of coat-hanger-wielding harridan that even the adoration of her fans could not counter. Still, she has endured as one of the most popular icons of the movies, an early role model to young women who were drawn to her image as a stylish magnetic power and an actress of unquestioned independence.

Labor Unions Have A Big Stake In Immigration Reform

April 10
By Adrian Florido
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Unions hope legalization for 11 million immigrants without authorization will make organizing those immigrants easier.

Tuition Assistance Program A Go For The Army

April 10
By Beth Ford Roth
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The U.S. Army restored its Tuition Assistance program today, after suspending new enrollment in the program last month due to sequestration cuts.

Surprise: Organic Apples And Pears Aren't Free Of Antibiotics

April 10
Maria Godoy / NPR
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Apples and especially pears are vulnerable to a nasty bacterial infection called fire blight that, left unchecked, can spread quickly, killing fruit trees and sometimes devastating whole orchards.

Post Office Will Keep Saturday Mail Delivery After All

April 10
Scott Neuman / NPR
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The U.S. Postal Service has backed off a plan to halt Saturday mail delivery, saying that Congress has forced it to continue the service despite massive cost overruns.

Section 8, Zero Tolerance And One Family Pushed To The Brink

April 10
By Megan Burks
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As zero tolerance falls out of fashion in other sectors, a Clinton-era housing rule remains and puts families at risk of homelessness.

Community College Scorecards Show Struggle To Serve The Unprepared

April 10
By Kyla Calvert
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California Community Colleges unveil online accountability reports for campuses in the system.

Thank G-O-O-D-N-E-S-S: The National Spelling Bee Adds Meaning

April 10
Linda Holmes / NPR
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As Eyder Peralta reported last night, the National Spelling Bee has made a big change to its rules.

Bipartisan Bill Would Extend Background Checks To Gun Shows

April 10
Mark Memmott / NPR
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We last updated the top of this post at 11:21 a.m. ET:

'Friends And Neighbors' Exception Part Of Deal On Gun Checks

April 10
Mark Memmott / NPR
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With the Senate set to vote on Democratic-backed gun control legislation that a group of Republicans have promised to filibuster, there's word that two key senators have put the finishing touches on a compromise over one key issue -- "universal" background checks for gun purchasers.

California Soldier Among Those Killed In Afghan Violence

April 10
By Beth Ford Roth
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Army Spc. Delfin M. Santos Jr., 24, of San Jose, California was among three soldiers killed April 6 in an explosion while escorting U.S. diplomat Anne Smedinghoff to deliver school books in Afghanistan. Smedinghoff and a Defense Department employee also died in the blast.

Companies On The Move Look For Healthy Workers

April 10
Eric Whitney / NPR
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It may cost less to do business in places where there's what some people call a culture of health. And that's put Colorado, which has the lowest rates of adult obesity in the country, on the map for companies looking to relocate or expand.

Riverside County considers pit bull law

April 10
Associated Press

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) -- Riverside County authorities are considering a law requiring pit bulls to be spayed and neutered in the wake of a deadly mauling.

New White House Budget Has Something For Everyone To Dislike

April 10
Scott Neuman / NPR
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President Obama will unveil his 2014 budget proposal on Wednesday, including cuts to Social Security and Medicare, as well as tax increases and new investments. The net, says the White House, will be $1.8 trillion in deficit reduction over the next decade.

Blue Angels Grounded, But MCAS Miramar Air Show To Go On

April 10
By Susan Murphy
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Sequestration cuts have grounded the famed Blue Angels. The Navy on Monday morning announced the cancellation of all remaining 2013 performances, including in San Diego.

Los Diablos: Mexican Firefighters In The US

April 10
Lorne Matalon
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They are known as Los Diablos, or the devils. Twenty years ago, they told rangers in Big Bend National Park that if U.S. authorities allowed them to help fire fires in the Park, they would work “like the devil.” Since then they’ve been true to their word, many times over.

Immigration activists rally across California

April 10
TERRY COLLINS / Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Demonstrators marched through San Francisco Wednesday in one of several rallies across California trying to shape the national immigration debate and press Congress to grant a path toward citizenship for immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

L.A. Schools Hire Security Aides To Watch For Threats

April 10
Kirk Siegler / NPR
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Tenth Street Elementary is in the Pico-Union district of Los Angeles, a few blocks west of the Staples Center and downtown skyscrapers. It's a tough neighborhood; school security is always an issue.

Construction Booming In Texas, But Many Workers Pay Dearly

April 10
Wade Goodwyn / NPR
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Like almost everything in the Texas, the construction industry in the Lone Star State is big. One in every 13 workers here is employed in the state's $54 billion-per-year construction industry.

Debt And The Modern Parent Of College Kids

April 10
NPR Staff / NPR
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It's college touring season, and many parents are on the road with their teenagers, driving from school to school and thinking about the college application -- and financial aid -- process that looms ahead.

Some Public Defenders Warn: 'We Have Nothing Left To Cut'

April 10
Carrie Johnson / NPR

Steven Nolder joined the federal public defender's office when it opened in Columbus, Ohio, nearly 18 years ago. Nolder handled his share of noteworthy cases, including the first federal death penalty trial in the district and the indictment of a former NFL quarterback embroiled in a ticket fraud scheme.