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Stories for April 14, 2013

Tax Day Is This Statue Of Liberty's Last Day Of Work

April 14
Nina Gregory / NPR
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The intersection of Crenshaw Boulevard and 28th Street looks like a lot of intersections in Los Angeles: There's a Taco Bell on one corner and a strip mall with a liquor store and a Liberty Tax Service office on the other. And out in front, as traffic speeds by, 27-year-old Robert Oliver is hard at work -- dancing.

Labor Nominee's Civil Rights Work Draws Praise, Controversy

April 14
Carrie Johnson / NPR
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President Obama's nominee to lead the Labor Department has been one of the most aggressive advocates for civil rights in decades. Tom Perez prosecuted a record number of hate crimes cases and extracted huge settlements from banks that overcharged minorities for home loans.

Mars Rovers Go Quiet, As Sun Blocks Transmissions

April 14
Bill Chappell / NPR
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Communications between the Earth and Mars are on hiatus for several weeks, thanks to interference from the sun. That means NASA's orbiters and rovers that study Mars will be left to their own devices until radio signals can once again travel between the two planets.

Pastor, Mentor And Social Activist: Remembering Gordon Cosby

April 14
Lily Percy / NPR
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When Reverend Gordon Cosby founded Church of the Saviour in the late 1940s, it was one of the first interracial churches in the still-segregated District of Columbia. Cosby, who died last month at the age of 95, is remembered not only for his work as a pastor, but for his commitment to social change.

Beer Bust: Yankees Rename 'Craft Beer' Stand At Stadium

April 14
Bill Chappell / NPR
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The baseball season is still young, but the New York Yankees have already faced harsh public criticism. No, we're not referring to their lackluster record. Instead, the Yanks were accused of trying to hoodwink beer drinkers with a new "Craft Beer Destination" concession stand at their Bronx stadium.

Violence Hits Guantanamo Bay, As Inmates Continue Hunger Strikes

April 14
Bill Chappell / NPR
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Inmates fought guards at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after military authorities decided to end communal housing in one of the prison's camps, and instead put prisoners in individual cells. At least one detainee was reportedly injured by a rubber bullet in the clash Saturday.

Police Sergeant Says Trayvon Martin Shooting Targets Were A Training Aid

April 14
Bill Chappell / NPR
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A police sergeant in Port Canaveral, Fla., has been fired after he brought targets bearing images resembling Trayvon Martin -- a silhouetted figure in a hooded sweatshirt, holding a canned drink -- to a police target practice session.

In Hazleton, A Mixed Welcome For City's Immigrants

April 14
Elizabeth Fiedler / NPR

Many residents say Hazleton, Pa., continues life now as a divided city. While some Spanish-speakers build new lives, longtime residents remain split on how the influx has changed their home.

Jazz In The Cafeteria: Kids Learn To Listen While They Chomp

April 14
Jenny Brundin / NPR

School lunch is often synonymous with loud noise. Studies have shown the decibel level in some cafeterias is as high as a lawn mower.

'Core Curriculum' Puts Education Experts At Odds

April 14
Claudio Sanchez / NPR

At 2 p.m., it's crunch time for students who write for The Harbinger Online, the award-winning, student news site at Shawnee Mission East High just outside Kansas City, Kan. They've been investigating an initiative to develop common curriculum and test guidelines for states.