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Stories for August 14, 2013

Tease photo for Review: 'Jobs'

Review: 'Jobs'

Aug. 14
By Nate John

All the ingenuity and creativity of Apple... tossed aside for a generic, listless biopic. The Steve Jobs film, "Jobs," opens everywhere August 16.

Tease photo for Search Warrants Reveal Details In Double Homicide, Abduction

Search Warrants Reveal Details In Double Homicide, Abduction

Aug. 14
City News Service

A crow bar and what appeared to be blood was found next to the body of a 44-year-old woman believed to have been tortured before being killed in Boulevard, along with her 8-year-old son, by her estranged husband's best friend, according to search warrants released.

Tease photo for Calif. Supreme Court Rejects Last Challenge To Same-Sex Marriages

Calif. Supreme Court Rejects Last Challenge To Same-Sex Marriages

Aug. 14
City News Service

More than a month after the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for same-sex weddings to resume in California, the state's highest court Wednesday rejected the last remaining legal challenge to the unions, while also formally dismissing a secondary petition filed by the San Diego County clerk.

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A Lover Of Horse Races, And Horses: Remembering Jack Germond

Aug. 14
David Folkenflik / NPR

Political reporter Jack Germond smoked and loved martinis and red wine and fine food and betting on horses -- he lived life large and didn't suffer phonies.

Gmail Users Shouldn't Expect Privacy, Google Says In Filing

Aug. 14
Bill Chappell / NPR

People who use Gmail and other free email systems have no reasonable expectation of privacy, according to papers filed in a U.S. district court by lawyers for Google. The filing was made in June, when Google moved to dismiss a case accusing it of breaking federal and state laws by scanning users' emails to help target its advertising campaigns.

Tease photo for Baby Boom Of Gray Whale Calves Complete First Migration

Baby Boom Of Gray Whale Calves Complete First Migration

Aug. 14
By Susan Murphy

More than 1,100 gray whale calves recently completed their first 5,000-mile northward journey from the warm water lagoons in Mexico, where they were born, to the Arctic Circle.

Tease photo for High Speed Computer Network Expanded In San Diego's East County

High Speed Computer Network Expanded In San Diego's East County

Aug. 14
By Erik Anderson

San Diego County officials celebrate expansion of backcountry high-speed computer network

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The Grid Of The Future Could Be Brought To You By ... You

Aug. 14
Elizabeth Shogren / NPR

The electricity system is experiencing growing pains these days. But it's not only demand for electricity that's expanding -- it's the sources of electricity, particularly unpredictable kinds, like wind farms and solar panels.

Tease photo for Kaiser Opens New Medical Complex In Carmel Valley

Kaiser Opens New Medical Complex In Carmel Valley

Aug. 14
By Kenny Goldberg

Kaiser's newest health facility is open in Carmel Valley, a veritable one-stop shop for most medical needs.

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More Companies Encourage Workers To Volunteer, On The Clock

Aug. 14
Annie Baxter / NPR

You're not likely to find many bankers wearing those old stereotypical green visors these days. But at U.S. Bank, some employees sport hairnets -- at least when they're serving breakfast.

Tease photo for Change Of Command For USS Ronald Reagan (Video)

Change Of Command For USS Ronald Reagan (Video)

Aug. 14
By Beth Ford Roth

Navy Capt. Christopher Bolt became Commanding Officer of the San Diego-based USS Ronald Reagan on Tuesday afternoon, replacing Capt. Thom Burke, who served as CO of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier for more than three years.

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'Nothing Racist' Implied In 'Obama' Act, Says Rodeo Clown

Aug. 14
Mark Memmott / NPR

Tuffy Gessling, the rodeo clown at the center of the controversy over the skit at the Missouri State Fair in which a man wearing a President Obama mask was mocked, says "nothing racist was ever implied."

Tease photo for Critics Challenge Cal Fire's Massive Wildfire Mitigation Plan

Critics Challenge Cal Fire's Massive Wildfire Mitigation Plan

Aug. 14
Midday Edition
Evening Edition

A massive "vegetation treatment" proposal to reduce wildfires is getting push back from Southern California wildland experts. The plan calls for controlled burns and other fire mitigation efforts covering tens of millions of acres across California. But critics say the proposal will not work in San Diego. We'll find out why.

Tease photo for Supporting A Politician Through Scandal

Supporting A Politician Through Scandal

Aug. 14
Midday Edition
Evening Edition

A recent poll finds more than 70 percent of San Diegans want Mayor Bob Filner to resign. How do people make up their minds about whether to stick with a politician or not?

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African-American Musicians, More Than Just Jazz

Aug. 14
NPR

Jazz or blues may be the first thing that comes to mind we think of the contributions that African Americans have made to American music genres, but that overlooks the rich heritage of African- Americans in classical music. For two decades the Gateways Music Festival has challenged that image. This year the festival celebrates its 20th Anniversary in Rochester, New York and continues to celebrate the contributions of African-Americans to classical music by featuring world class musicians and conductors of African heritage.

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French Maker Of Military Rafts Gets An American Identity

Aug. 14
Jackie Northam / NPR

For roughly two decades, the Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts. These rafts, especially the high-end model F470, are not the recreational rafts you take out to the lake on a Sunday, says Lionel Boudeau, the head of Zodiac's North America operations.

Tease photo for Pentagon Extends Benefits To Same-Sex Spouses

Pentagon Extends Benefits To Same-Sex Spouses

Aug. 14
By Beth Ford Roth

The Pentagon announced today it will extend benefits to same-sex military spouses, retroactive to the date the Supreme Court ruled the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional. Benefits will become available to married same-sex couples no later than September 3.

Tease photo for Hugh Laurie - Live On The Queen Mary

Hugh Laurie - Live On The Queen Mary

Aug. 14

Hugh Laurie marks the climax of his personal musical odyssey with a tribute to Professor Longhair, the man who is his greatest inspiration. Joined by the legendary Copper Bottom Band on the same stage where Longhair delivered his master class in 1975, Laurie puts on a once-in-a-lifetime, unforgettable performance.

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Journalist Jack Germond, One Of The 'Boys On The Bus,' Dies

Aug. 14
Korva Coleman / NPR

Political journalist and author Jack Germond died Wednesday at his home in West Virginia. He was 85.

Tease photo for Environmentalists Deliver Climate Change Denier Award To Congressman Issa

Environmentalists Deliver Climate Change Denier Award To Congressman Issa

Aug. 14
By Susan Murphy

A group of environmentalists on Tuesday delivered a climate change denier award to Congressman Darrel Issa’s Vista office. A San Diego climate researcher says people in denial about climate change are "downright dangerous."

Tease photo for Plenty Of Ways Filner Recall Could Fail

Plenty Of Ways Filner Recall Could Fail

Aug. 14
By Claire Trageser

Never in San Diego's history has a mayoral recall seemed more possible. Yet experts say it will still be an extremely daunting feat.

Tease photo for California's Newest Medical School Opens At UC Riverside

California's Newest Medical School Opens At UC Riverside

Aug. 14
By Kenny Goldberg

UC Riverside's new medical school has a unique mission: to produce doctors who want to serve in California's Inland Empire.

Tease photo for Preview: New Play Cafe's Simply Sci-Fi

Preview: New Play Cafe's Simply Sci-Fi

Aug. 14
Midday Edition
By Beth Accomando

The Big Kitchen Cafe is known for its home-style cooking and desserts but starting tonight you may get a close encounter along with your strawberry shortcake thanks to the New Play Café’s Simply Sci-Fi.

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A Postman's 1963 Walk For Justice, Cut Short On An Alabama Road

Aug. 14
Miles Johnson / NPR

In April of 1963, a Baltimore mailman set off to deliver the most important letter in his life -- one he wrote himself. William Lewis Moore decided to walk along Highway 11 from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., hoping to hand-deliver his letter to Gov. Ross Barnett. Moore wanted Barnett to fundamentally change Mississippi's racial hierarchy -- something unthinkable for a Southern politician at the time.

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10 Years After The Blackout, How Has The Power Grid Changed?

Aug. 14
Dan Bobkoff / NPR

Ten years ago, a sagging power line hit a tree near Cleveland, tripping some circuit breakers. To compensate, power was rerouted to a nearby line, which began to overheat and sink down into another tree, tripping another circuit. The resulting cascade created a massive blackout in the Northeast U.S., affecting power in eight states and part of Canada.

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Determined To Reach 1963 March, Teen Used Thumb And Feet

Aug. 14
Michele Norris / NPR

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capitol from all over the country for the mass demonstration.