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Stories for January 15, 2013

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Love Of Football May Kick America Down The Path Of Ruination

Jan. 15
Frank Deford / NPR

This may sound far-fetched, but football reminds me of Venice. Both are so tremendously popular, but it's the very things that made them so that could sow the seeds of their ruin.

Sanford-Burnham Research Institute Chief Takes Job With ‘Big Pharma’

Sanford-Burnham Research Institute Chief Takes Job With ‘Big Pharma’

Jan. 15
By Tom Fudge

John Reed, CEO of Sanford-Burnham Research Institute, has become the research head for Roche Pharmaceuticals.

Edison Wants San Onofre Documents From State Investigation Kept Secret

Edison Wants San Onofre Documents From State Investigation Kept Secret

Jan. 15
By Amita Sharma

Southern California Edison wants most of its testimony kept secret in a state investigation into what went wrong with the San Onofre nuclear plant.

Increased Logging Oversight Under Proposed Budget

Jan. 15
Amy Quinton, Capital Public Radio

California Governor Jerry Brown’s proposed budget would add new jobs to help protect the environment and oversee logging in the state.

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS: Rodrigo Y Gabriela

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS: Rodrigo Y Gabriela

Jan. 15

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS continues its longstanding tradition of showcasing the best of original American music. In this episode, famed Mexican guitar duo Rodrigo y Gabriela performs a unique fusion of flamenco, jazz and rock.

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Supreme Court: Floating Home Still A Man's Castle

Jan. 15
Nina Totenberg / NPR

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a Florida man's floating home was a house, not a boat, and that therefore, the city marina where he kept it docked could not seize the structure under federal maritime law. The case could affect thousands of houseboat owners nationwide.

Chargers Hire New Coach, Mike McCoy From Denver Broncos

Chargers Hire New Coach, Mike McCoy From Denver Broncos

Jan. 15
City News Service

Denver Broncos offensive coordinator Mike McCoy was hired today as head coach of the San Diego Chargers, replacing the fired Norv Turner.

City Heights School Clinics Keep Students Healthy And In Class

City Heights School Clinics Keep Students Healthy And In Class

Jan. 15
By Megan Burks

City Height's newest school clinic at Monroe Clark middle school is helping students get quality health care. School administrators say the effort helps keep attendance levels and academic achievement high because healthy students are more likely to show up to class. That's the case for Andrea Vizcarra, who is getting support for her high blood pressure on campus.

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Porn Industry Turned Off By L.A. Mandate For Condoms On Set

Jan. 15
Mandalit del Barco / NPR

In November, more than 1.5 million Los Angeles County voters passed the Safer Sex in the Adult Film Industry Act. The new law orders porn actors to wear condoms during sex scenes.

Anthem Blue Cross Sued Over New HIV/AIDS Drug Policy

Jan. 15
By Kenny Goldberg

Anthem Blue Cross's new policy requiring HIV/AIDS patients to get their drugs by mail order has prompted a lawsuit charging the move is discriminatory.

Did Prosecutors Go Too Far In Swartz Case?

Jan. 15
Carrie Johnson / NPR

Criticism is raining down on prosecutors in Massachusetts after the suicide of computer genius Aaron Swartz, who helped to develop innovations like RSS.

Governor Brown Praises Online College Course Program

Jan. 15
Marianne Russ, Capital Public Radio

California Governor Jerry Brown says a new online college course program could help students get the classes they need to graduate more quickly.

Local Refugee Community Celebrates Karen New Year

Local Refugee Community Celebrates Karen New Year

Jan. 15
Brian Myers

Refugees from Myanmar celebrated the Karen New Year on Jan. 12 in City Heights.

George P. Bush Raises Big Bucks For Unfocused Campaign

George P. Bush Raises Big Bucks For Unfocused Campaign

Jan. 15
By David Martin Davies

George P. Bush hasn't announced which office he's running for, but he's already raised $1.3 million for a campaign.

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Newtown Prompts Gun Buybacks, But Do They Work?

Jan. 15
Scott Neuman / NPR

In the weeks since the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., communities across the country have wanted to do something about gun control, and many have turned to an old standby: buybacks.

Grave Of Fallen Camp Pendleton Marine Site of Friend's Re-Enlistmen...

Grave Of Fallen Camp Pendleton Marine Site of Friend's Re-Enlistment (Video)

Jan. 15
By Beth Ford Roth

A close friend of fallen Camp Pendleton Marine Lance Cpl. Jared Verbeek decided to honor his former Marine Corps comrade by re-enlisting at his grave.

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Law Expands Kids' Dental Coverage, But Few Dentists Will Treat Them

Jan. 15
Michelle Andrews / NPR

Kids may not exactly jump for joy to learn that the health care overhaul makes it easier for them to get their teeth cleaned, filled and straightened.

'NRA Practice Range' App Sparks Outrage, Questions

Jan. 15
Mark Memmott / NPR

The appearance Monday of a new iPhone/iPad app called "NRA: Practice Range" is causing controversy. Critics say release of the game on the one-month anniversary of the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., was callous. And they're also incensed that it's tied to the NRA, which has pinned part of the blame for mass shootings on violent video games.

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A New Chapter? A Launch Of The Bookless Library

Jan. 15
Reema Khrais / NPR

If your idea of a library is row upon row of nicely shelved hardcovers, then you'll be in for a surprise when a planned new library in San Antonio opens this fall.

Keeping Aging Brains Healthy

Keeping Aging Brains Healthy

Jan. 15
By Maureen Cavanaugh

TIps on delaying symptoms of Alzheimer's are outlined in a new prevention program.

Sister Wendy At The Norton Simon Museum

Sister Wendy At The Norton Simon Museum

Jan. 15

Sister Wendy Beckett, the world-famous “art nun,” offers her unique and personal guide to one of the most extraordinary collections of Old Master, Impressionist, Modern and Asian art in the United States. Sister Wendy explores the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, Calif., which bears the hallmark of one private collector, its founder, Norton Simon. In her trademark manner, she offers her own inimitable reflections on some of the collection’s most famous works and some of its lesser-known gems.

San Diego Police Chief Supports Greater Gun Regulation

San Diego Police Chief Supports Greater Gun Regulation

Jan. 15
By Marissa Cabrera, Maureen Cavanaugh, Peggy Pico

How would gun laws look like if it were up to San Diego Police Chief William Lansdowne?

Soldiers In Afghanistan React To Change In Breakfast Service

Soldiers In Afghanistan React To Change In Breakfast Service

Jan. 15
By Beth Ford Roth

Soldiers in Afghanistan have been filling Home Post in on what it means to no longer get a hot breakfast each morning - and it has a lot more to do with morale than hunger. The comments are in response to a story that appeared in Home Post last week about the Pentagon's dismissal of a viral email that claimed all troops in Afghanistan weren't getting breakfast.

LIVE AT THE BELLY UP: The Tilt And Dead Feather Moon

LIVE AT THE BELLY UP: The Tilt And Dead Feather Moon

Jan. 15
By Jennifer Robinson

Watch The Tilt and Dead Feather Moon perform. Sometimes all you need is music. And sometimes you need that music live. Welcome to LIVE AT THE BELLY UP. San Diego has long been known as a hotbed of great musical talent. What’s more, San Diego is home to one of the best music venues on the West Coast. Since 1974, the Belly Up has been featuring great local bands from the Cedros Design District.

Obama Has 'Binder Of Latinos' Problem With Cabinet

Jan. 15
By David Martin Davies

President Barack Obama’s press conference Monday was dominated by questions about the “debt ceiling” and gun control, but he was also quizzed about diversity on his second term cabinet.

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The Reselling Of Lance: A Job Too Big Even For Oprah

Jan. 15
Liz Halloran / NPR

You may have heard that banned-for-life pro cyclist Lance Armstrong, in an interview with Oprah Winfrey, has admitted to doping.

Hagel Vows To Extend Benefits To Gay Military Families

Hagel Vows To Extend Benefits To Gay Military Families

Jan. 15
By Beth Ford Roth

In a letter sent to California Senator Barbara Boxer, Defense Secretary nominee Chuck Hagel promised to extend military benefits to gay and lesbian military families.

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The Politics Of Disaster Aid Are Starting To Shift

Jan. 15
Alan Greenblatt / NPR

House Republicans are taking a Solomonic approach to relief for areas ravaged by Superstorm Sandy.

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Monsanto Lawyer Suggests New Standard For Suing Farmers

Jan. 15
Dan Charles / NPR

For years, the biotech giant Monsanto has provoked outrage among its critics for suing farmers who save and replant seeds from the company's patented Roundup Ready crops, such as soybeans and canola.

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Wal-Mart Offers Veterans Jobs, Expects To Hire 100,000 Over Five Years

Jan. 15
Mark Memmott / NPR

Saying that "hiring a veteran can be one of the best business decisions you make," Wal-Mart U.S. CEO Bill Simon confirmed this morning that the retail giant is launching a plan to hire more than 100,000 recently discharged veterans over the next five years.

San Diego Zoo, Audubon Teaming Up To Save Endangered Species

San Diego Zoo, Audubon Teaming Up To Save Endangered Species

Jan. 15
Associated Press

Two top zoos are creating a home where endangered antelope can roam and help repopulate their species on 1,000 acres in New Orleans.

U.S. Military Helping French Attack On Al Qaeda In Mali

U.S. Military Helping French Attack On Al Qaeda In Mali

Jan. 15
Lolita C. Baldor - Associated Press

The U.S. is already providing intelligence-gathering assistance to the French in their assault on Islamist extremists in Mali, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said, and officials would not rule out having American aircraft land in the West African nation as part of future efforts to lend airlift and logistical support.

Flu Wave Stresses Out Hospitals

Flu Wave Stresses Out Hospitals

Jan. 15
Jenny Gold, NPR

It's still too soon to say whether this is a historically bad flu season. But it's already clear that emergency rooms around the country are filled with a feverish throng that is much larger than the last time around.

Strong Winds To Whip Through San Diego Mountains And Valleys

Jan. 15
City News Service

Strong and damaging winds will buffet the valleys and mountains of San Diego County today and may linger into Thursday, forecasters said.

Facebook More Memorable Than Books Or Faces

Facebook More Memorable Than Books Or Faces

Jan. 15
By Angela Carone

There are roughly 30 million updates posted to Facebook over the course of an hour. People share what they’re eating or their favorite movie. A new study out of UC San Diego has some surprising things to say about how memorable those updates really are.

New Welcome Home Program Helps Homeless Military Veterans

New Welcome Home Program Helps Homeless Military Veterans

Jan. 15
By Dwane Brown

A program called "Welcome Home" is helping the VA do more than place a roof over someone's head.

Filner Stresses Transit, Environments, Neighborhoods In State Of Th...

Filner Stresses Transit, Environments, Neighborhoods In State Of The City

Jan. 15
By Katie Orr / Capital Public Radio

Newly elected Mayor Bob Filner delivered his inaugural State of the City address Tuesday to a full house at Balboa Theater.

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White House Plan On Guns To Include 19 Executive Actions, Lawmakers Say

Jan. 15
Mark Memmott / NPR

The plan for reducing gun violence that the White House will release this week includes 19 steps that don't require legislative action by Congress, lawmakers who have been briefed on the administration's thinking tell The New York Times, Politico and other news outlets.

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Training Program Aims To Prep Soldiers For Civilian Jobs

Jan. 15
Jess Mador / NPR

Thousands of Minnesota soldiers deployed in Kuwait woke up to a surprise last spring. Just weeks before the end of their tour, a group of corporate recruiters in business casual showed up on base. The first-of-its kind visit was part of a new strategy to help returning service members find civilian jobs before their feet even hit U.S. soil.

More Young People Are Moving Away From Religion, But Why?

More Young People Are Moving Away From Religion, But Why?

Jan. 15
NPR Staff / NPR

One-fifth of Americans are religiously unaffiliated -- higher than at any time in recent U.S. history -- and those younger than 30 especially seem to be drifting from organized religion. A third of young Americans say they don't belong to any religion.