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Stories for January 18, 2013

Filner Vetoes Two Port Appointments Made By City Council

Jan. 18
KPBS News
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Mayor Bob Filner vetoed the City Council's two appointments to the San Diego Unified Port District on Friday.

Lance And Oprah: Round Two

Jan. 18
Greg Myre / NPR
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Armstrong has shown little emotion in the interview. But he had to stop and compose himself when Winfrey asked what he said to his three older kids, Luke, 13, and his twin daughters, 11.

Behind The Scenes: 'The Daughter Of The Regiment'

Jan. 18
Evening Edition
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The San Diego Opera kicks off it's 48th season next weekend with "The Daughter of the Regiment." KPBS arts reporter Beth Accomando sat in on a rehearsal to get the low down on singing the high C's in the opera's famous aria.

New Deal Allows Sara Kruzan To Seek Parole In 1995 Murder Case

Jan. 18
By Amita Sharma
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Sara Kruzan, who was sentenced to life in prison without parole for killing her pimp when she was 16, now has a shot at freedom.

'Invasive' Body Scanners Will Be Removed From Airports

Jan. 18
Lizzy Duffy / NPR
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The Transportation Security Administration will remove controversial body scanners from airport security after OSI Systems Inc. didn't update its machines' software to make scanned images of airline passengers less revealing.

INDEPENDENT LENS: Beauty Is Embarrassing

Jan. 18
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INDEPENDENT LENS: Beauty Is Embarrassing  Tease photo

If you’ve seen “Pee-Wee’s Playhouse,” you’re already familiar with the off-kilter sensibility of Wayne White. Savor the work of an artist who’s become an iconic auteur of the weird, the silly and the joyfully absurd, from a dancing chicken carcass in a Peter Gabriel video to giant cardboard masks of one-term presidents to wildly successful and often obscene word paintings. A husband, father and Tennessee native who is happy picking a banjo on the porch swing, White approaches elder statesman territory even as he flatly refuses to grow up.

PIONEERS OF TELEVISION: Primetime Soaps

Jan. 18
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PIONEERS OF TELEVISION: Primetime Soaps Tease photo

"Dallas" and "Dynasty" kicked off the nighttime soap frenzy in the late 1970s and spun off the long-lasting series "Knots Landing." Sometimes forgotten is the genre's antecedent: 1964's "Peyton Place," which starred Mia Farrow and Ryan O'Neal. Interviewees in this episode include Larry Hagman, Joan Collins, Linda Evans, Diahann Carroll, Linda Gray, Patrick Duffy, Michele Lee, Joan Van Ark and Donna Mills.

UC President Mark Yudof To Step Down In August

Jan. 18
TERENCE CHEA, Associated Press
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University of California President Mark Yudof said Friday that he plans to step down in August, citing a "spate of taxing health issues."

Stink Bug's Resurfacing May Squash Farmers' Hopes For A Strong 2013

Jan. 18
Sabri Ben-Anchour / NPR
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If you live along the East Coast, there's a pretty good chance that stink bugs may be lurking in your attic or even behind your curtains. The invasive insects from Asia, which exude a rubber-like stench when you crush them, are a nuisance for you, but a serious pest for farmers.

Market Warriors: Antiquing In New Milford, Conn.

Jan. 18
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Market Warriors: Antiquing In New Milford, Conn. Tease photo

Pickers Miller, John, Bob and Kevin head to New Milford, Connecticut, home to Elephant Trunk Country Flea Market, a weekly sale that starts at the crack of dawn and where the pickers are challenged to find something metal. In the Shop ’Til You Stop round, pickers Bob and John duke it out to determine who has first dibs on an antique butter churn. This week’s items are sent to Ken Farmer’s Auctions in Radford, Virginia, where the pickers find themselves neck-and-neck until the end.

12 Half-Truths We Live With

Jan. 18
Linton Weeks / NPR
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Say it isn't so. Various newsorganizations have recently reported that on occasion the Subway sandwich chain's $5 footlong measures 11 inches instead of 12. Sure enough, the bacon, lettuce and tomato jewel we bought Friday was at least a half-inch shy of a foot.

For Cartoonists Who Cover Obama: Four More Ears

Jan. 18
Alison MacAdam / NPR
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Four years ago, when the nation's first African-American president was inaugurated, even conservative editorial cartoonists marked the moment with reverence.

Antiques Roadshow: Corpus Christi, Texas - Hour Three

Jan. 18
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In Corpus Christi, Texas, host Mark L. Walberg and appraiser Kevin Zavian discuss the somber, yet fascinating, topic of antique mourning jewelry. ANTIQUES ROADSHOW finds art that spans the 20th century in the sparkling city by the sea, including a 1912 portrait by Charles Courtney Curran, a Porfirio Salinas Bluebonnet oil painting and a 1983 Helen Frankenthaler lithograph appraised at $15,000.

Grand Jury Indicts Ray Nagin On Corruption Charges

Jan. 18
Bill Chappell / NPR
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Former New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin has been indicted on 21 counts of bribery and other corruption charges by a federal grand jury. When he became the city's mayor in 2002, Nagin, a former cable TV executive, promised to revive New Orleans' economy, and its trust in the city's government.

More Tears For Notre Dame's 'Fake Tragedy' Than A Real Girl's Death?

Jan. 18
Mark Memmott / NPR
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The bizarre story of Notre Dame star linebacker Manti Te'o and the girlfriend he now says never existed has exploded on to newssites and TV channels this week.

Martha Stewart's Cooking School: Frying

Jan. 18
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The best fried foods are golden brown on the outside and deliciously tender within — never greasy or soggy. In this episode, Martha offers lessons in how to deep-fry and pan-fry to perfection in your own kitchen. Recipes and step-by-step techniques include French fries, pan-fried chicken (a Southern favorite marinated in buttermilk before coating) and Japanese tempura vegetables with dipping sauces. She shares lots of tips for keeping foods crisp without allowing them to absorb excess oil.

Miramar Osprey Drops Bucket, Damages San Diego Business (Video)

Jan. 18
By Beth Ford Roth
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An Osprey based at MCAS Miramar accidentally dropped a five-pound bucket of cleaning fluid while in flight on Wednesday evening. The bucket crashed through the roof of a San Diego auto body shop that was closed at the time. No one was hurt.

Great Performances At The Met: L'Elisir d'Amore

Jan. 18
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Great Performances At The Met: L'Elisir d'Amore  Tease photo

Anna Netrebko and Matthew Polenzani, as the fickle Adina and her besotted Nemorino, star in Bartlett Sher’s new production of one of the great comic gems in opera. Mariusz Kwiecien is the blustery sergeant Belcore and Ambrogio Maestri is Dulcamara, the loveable quack and dispenser of the elixir. Maurizio Benini conducts.

FBI: Confessed Killer Of Border Patrol Agent Is Lying

Jan. 18
By Michel Marizco
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The FBI said the man who allegedly confessed to the murder of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry in a broadcast interview lied to garner attention.

Roundtable: Filner Speaks; Local Gun Control; Building Heights; Chargers Hires

Jan. 18
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
7 Comments
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Mayor Filner's had a very busy week. Local gun control advocates are speaking up. A limit on building heights in coastal San Diego has shaped the city. And the Chargers are staying for awhile, at least, with a new coach and general manager.

Military Spouses' Club Offers Guest Membership To Lesbian

Jan. 18
By Beth Ford Roth
1 Comment
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A military spouses' club that came under fire for denying membership to the wife of a lesbian soldier is now offering her "guest" membership. But Ashley Broadway is rejecting the offer, calling it "just plain hurtful."

Teacher Evaluation Impasse Costs New York City Hundreds Of Millions

Jan. 18
Bill Chappell / NPR
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In New York City, the failure to agree on a plan for evaluating its teachers is being widely criticized, especially because it means the city will now miss out on hundreds of millions of dollars in state financing.

Chatsworth House

Jan. 18
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Chatsworth House Tease photo

CHATSWORTH HOUSE is an engaging three-part series that provides an access-all-areas experience inside one of Britain's most majestic stately homes. What is life like today for the 12th Duke of Devonshire who inherited the estate which has been in his family for 450 years? What is life like for the staff of 700 who work on the premises? With all the characters you'd expect to find in a great house, like the head housekeeper who maintains the 300 rooms, and the gamekeepers whose pheasants end up on the dining table, CHATSWORTH HOUSE is a fascinating look at class and tradition in a modern world that plays out like a real-life Downton Abbey.

USS Guardian Crew Removed As Navy Attempts To Free Grounded Ship (Video)

Jan. 18
By Beth Ford Roth
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The Navy ordered the removal of the 79 Sailors who make up the crew of the USS Guardian after the ship ran aground Thursday on a coral reef off the coast of the Philippines.

Body Exhumed Of Lottery Winner Who Suffered Cyanide-Related Death

Jan. 18
Mark Memmott / NPR
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The remains of Urooj Khan, the Chicago man who last July died one day after his $425,000 check from the Illinois lottery was cut, were exhumed today, the Chicago Tribune reports.

Soldier Killed In Afghanistan

Jan. 18
By Beth Ford Roth
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Army Sgt. David J. Chambers, 25, was killed in Afghanistan on January 16.

Border Agent To Be Sentenced For Corruption

Jan. 18
Associated Press
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A Customs and Border Protection agent could face federal prison for allowing a convicted human trafficker to enter the U.S. at a San Diego border crossing.

San Diego Airport Dealing With A Rat Problem

Jan. 18
City News Service
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Officials at San Diego's Lindbergh Field airport are scampering to deal with a rat problem.

Calif. Endowment Announces Funding To Help Undocumented Get Health Care

Jan. 18
By Megan Burks
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On the heels of Gov. Jerry Brown's proposal to spend $350 million implementing federal health reform in California comes another announcement. A private health organization has pledged a hefty sum to help with the effort and go a step further. It wants to help undocumented immigrants get health care.

San Diego Honors Late Martin Luther King Jr. At Awards Breakfast

Jan. 18
City News Service
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Events to honor Martin Luther King Jr. began today when around 2,000 people attended a breakfast in honor of the slain civil rights leader in Mission Valley.

Figuring How To Pay For (Chimp) Retirement

Jan. 18
Nell Greenfieldboyce / NPR
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Retirees flock to Florida -- and the Sunshine State even has a retirement home for chimpanzees.

Livestrong 'Disappointed' By Lance Armstrong, But Still Grateful To Him

Jan. 18
Mark Memmott / NPR
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After Part 1 of cyclist Lance Armstrong's confession about doping aired Thursday night on the Oprah Winfrey Network, the Livestrong cancer charity he helped found released a statement that says, in part:

Review: 'The Last Stand'

Jan. 18
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"The Last Stand" (opening January 18 throughout San Diego) marks the Hollywood debut of South Korean director Kim Jee-Woon.

Experts Urge Caution As $50 Billion In Sandy Aid Passes House

Jan. 18
Christopher Joyce / NPR
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The House of Representatives passed a bill this week to spend $50 billion to help states struck by Hurricane Sandy. The action comes more than two months after the storm, and the measure now goes to the Senate.

As Social Issues Drive Young From Church, Leaders Try To Keep Them

Jan. 18
Heidi Glenn / NPR
1 Comment

On Friday, Morning Edition wraps up its weeklong look at the growing number of people who say they do not identify with a religion. The final conversation in the Losing Our Religion series picks up on a theme made clear throughout the week: Young adults are drifting away from organized religion in unprecedented numbers. In Friday's story, NPR's David Greene talks to two religious leaders about the trend and wonders what they tell young people who are disillusioned with the church.

The Moment Race Mattered: A Haunting Childhood Memory

Jan. 18
NPR Staff / NPR
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When Bernard Holyfield was 5 years old, he was the proud owner of a dog named Lassie, a collie who closely resembled the namesake fictional dog on television.

Review: 'Mama'

Jan. 18
By Beth Accomando
4 Comments
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Halloween's long past but it's never too late for a good ghost story. Guillermo Del Toro is once again mentoring a new director, this time with the film "Mama" (opening January 18 throughout San Diego).

T-Shirts Provide Easy Medical Access For Cancer Kids

Jan. 18
By Dwane Brown
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Modern t-shirts provide easy access to medication for children with cancer.