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Stories for January 4, 2013

Former Prisoner Secures His Freedom By Admitting To A Felony

Jan. 4
Joseph Shapiro / NPR
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Ernie Lopez, who was convicted of sexually assaulting a 6-month-old girl in Texas, accepted a plea deal in Amarillo, Texas, today. But that wasn't the result Lopez may have expected last January, when the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals threw out his conviction.

Rape Case Shakes Ohio Town, Fueled By Social Media And Anger

Jan. 4
NPR
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Ohio's attorney general says his office has taken over the case of a teenage girl who was allegedly raped by two members of a high school football team last August. The case attracted more national attention this week, after a photo and video that are alleged to have been taken on the night in question were

Obama Expected To Nominate Former Sen. Hagel For Top Pentagon Post

Jan. 4
NPR Staff / NPR
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President Barack Obama may round out his new national security leadership team next week, with a nomination for defense secretary expected and a pick to lead the CIA possible.

Parks Department Investigation Shows Intentional Hiding of Funds

Jan. 4
Amy Quinton, Capital Public Radio Network
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The California Attorney General’s office has released its investigation into the funding surplus at the state Parks Department.It shows part of the $54 million dollars found in two funds were intentionally hidden.

History Detectives: Bill Of Sale; Powder Horn; Star Spangled Banner; 1775 Almanac

Jan. 4
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History Detectives: Bill Of Sale; Powder Horn; Star Spangled Banner; 1775 Almanac   Tease photo

HISTORY DETECTIVES tells four stories of our nation’s beginning. First, Eduardo Pagán starts with a simple bill of sale for a 17-year old “negro girl” and learns how young Willoby’s life unfolds from being property to owning property. Then Gwen Wright traces a powder horn from a muddy Minnesota field to a military captain in Massachusetts during the American Revolution. Elyse Luray asks what role a handwritten score played in making “The Star Spangled Banner” our national anthem. Finally, notes in a 1775 almanac show how conflicting loyalties strained family ties during the Revolution.

Escondido Voting Rights Case Moves Forward

Jan. 4
By Alison St John
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A judge today set a trial date to consider whether the city of Escondido should change how councilmembers are elected to better represent the Latino community.

Baby Boomers' Last Wishes: Motorcycle Hearses And Facebook Obits

Jan. 4
Peter Gray / NPR
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Old Aristocracy Hill isn't a part of Springfield, Ill., that draws a lot of attention. The quiet neighborhood dates back to before the Civil War, its historic homes now carefully preserved by proud business owners.

ICE Helps Bust International Child Porn Ring

Jan. 4
By Michel Marizco
1 Comment

An international child pornography investigation led to the arrest of 245 people, including some in Arizona and California.

Longtime San Diego Philanthropist Murray Galinson Dies At Age 75

Jan. 4
City News Service
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Memorial services were pending today for Murray Galinson, a longtime San Diego banker, philanthropist and political kingmaker.

San Diego Gets State Money To Repair Mission Beach Seawall

Jan. 4
City News Service
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A $700,000 state grant will help the city of San Diego pay for repairs to the seawall at Mission Beach, area political leaders announced today.

FRONTLINE: The Education Of Michelle Rhee

Jan. 4
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FRONTLINE: The Education Of Michelle Rhee   Tease photo

Michelle Rhee, the former chancellor of Washington, D.C., public schools, is one of the most admired and reviled school reformers in America. FRONTLINE was granted unprecedented access to Rhee during her tumultuous three-year tenure as she attempted to fix a broken school system. As Rhee returns to the national stage, FRONTLINE examines her legacy in Washington, D.C., including her battles with the teachers’ union and her handling of a cheating scandal in the District.

Amid Instability In Egypt, Coptic Christians Flee To U.S.

Jan. 4
Bruce Wallace / NPR
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Coptic Christians will celebrate Christmas on Monday, and many will do so outside their native Egypt. Since the revolution there, their future in the country has looked uncertain, and many are resettling in the United States.

CBP Agents' Integrity Questioned

Jan. 4
By Michel Marizco
1 Comment

A new Government Accountability report says the Homeland Security Department doesn’t have a plan to maintain integrity among its agents.

Tutoring And Soccer Go Hand-In-Hand At San Diego Non-Profit

Jan. 4
Evening Edition
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Over 12,000 legal refugees have resettled in San Diego County in the last four years. For many, the transition to American life can be stressful and overwhelming, particularly for kids. But one organization is determined to help.

Roundtable: Qualcomm Stadium, District 4 Election, Filner And Transparency, Desert Energy Plan

Jan. 4
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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Qualcomm Stadium may not be on its last down; some voters in District 4 will be disenfranchised; Mayor Filner is having transparency problems; and a new inter-agency plan tries to balance development and environment in the desert.

Martha Stewart's Cooking School: Braising

Jan. 4
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Martha Stewart's Cooking School: Braising  Tease photo

Braising is a busy cook’s best friend, and here’s why: with little hands-on time and no special equipment, this “low-and-slow” method produces hearty, consistently flavorful main courses and side dishes that belie their ease. It’s also a great way to cook lean, inexpensive cuts of meat. Martha shows you which cuts are ideal for braising and the best ways to cook them, sharing recipes for classic pot roast, braised cabbage with apples and pulled pork sandwiches.

Billy Connolly's Route 66

Jan. 4
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Billy Connolly's Route 66  Tease photo

Affable Scottish comedian/actor Billy Connolly takes the ultimate road trip as he travels the world's most famous highway, Route 66. In this stylish mini-series, Connolly adopts a kind of "Easy Rider" approach to the trek as he makes the iconic 2,488 mile journey from Chicago to Santa Monica. With his unrivaled ability to tell a great story, he brings to life both the big and small moments of American history — the world changing events and the comic asides.

Rants and Raves: 'Zero Dark Thirty'

Jan. 4
By Beth Accomando
1 Comment
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"Zero Dark Thirty" (opening January 4 throughout San Diego) has been racking up award nominations but it's also getting criticized for its depiction of torture.

San Diego To Appoint Two New Port Commissioners

Jan. 4
By Katie Orr
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The Unified Port of San Diego regulates development, business and recreation along miles of the San Diego Bay. Five cities have delegates to the Port board and next week San Diego will choose its newest representatives.

San Diego Researchers Promote Safe Driving For Seniors

Jan. 4
By Dwane Brown
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By 2020 there will be more than 40 million licensed drivers over the age of 65.

Review: 'Zero Dark Thirty'

Jan. 4
By Nathan John
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Kathryn Bigelow delivers a gripping and tense film that leads us through the greatest manhunt in modern American history – the CIA’s search for Osama bin Laden. (Opens everywhere Jan 4.)