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Stories for July 10, 2013

Mexico May Ease Restrictions On Foreign Ownership Of Property

July 10
By Adrian Florido
3 Comments
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Supporters say a Mexican constitutional amendment allow non-U.S. citizens to more easily buy coastal property would spur tourism.

Medi-Cal And Obamacare: More Confusing Twists

July 10
Emily Bazar / CHCF Center for Health Reporting
0 Comments

Q: If my family of six qualifies for Medi-Cal under the Affordable Care Act, do we have to sign up for that? Or can we still buy subsidized health care plans through Covered California? ... I have real concerns about the quality of care we would get on Medi-Cal. I'm hoping for a positive answer!

Snowden Is A Whistle-Blower, Americans Say In Poll

July 10
Bill Chappell / NPR
0 Comments
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More than half of American voters in a new Quinnipiac University national poll say that Edward Snowden is a whistle-blower, not a traitor. Interviewers asked more than 2,000 people about the National Security Agency contract worker who leaked secret documents about U.S. surveillance. They also asked about the line between privacy and security.

Escondido Homeowners File Petition To Stop Development Of Closed Golf Course

July 10
By Kyla Calvert
1 Comment
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A group of Escondido homeowners has submitted to the city clerk a petition they say will preserve green space by preventing development on land that, until this spring, was a golf course.

GOP Says, Why Not Delay That Health Care Law, Like, Forever?

July 10
Julie Rovner / NPR
0 Comments
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Sensing that recent delays in key portions of the Affordable Care Act have caught the Obama administration at a weak point in its rollout of the law, Republicans in Congress are doubling down on their efforts to cripple the measure, at least in the eyes of the public if not in fact.

Asiana Flight 214: Updates From The NTSB Investigation

July 10
Bill Chappell / NPR
0 Comments
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A news briefing is underway on Asiana Airlines Flight 214, the jetliner that crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport this past weekend. National Transportation Safety Board Chair Deborah Hersman updates the media and the public on the investigation into the crash that killed two passengers and injured dozens.

Supporters Ask Filner To Resign Over Sexual Harassment Claims

July 10
Midday Edition
53 Comments
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Three staunch supporters of Mayor Bob Filner publicly urged him to step down from his post in response to sexual harassment allegations from "numerous" women.

Asians Flight 214: Updates From The NTSB Investigation

July 10
Bill Chappell / NPR
0 Comments

A news briefing is underway on Asiana Airlines Flight 214, the jetliner that crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport this past weekend. National Transportation Safety Board Chair Deborah Hersman updates the media and the public on the investigation into the crash that killed two passengers and injured dozens.

San Diego Health Centers Get Federal Grants To Enroll People In New Plans

July 10
By Kenny Goldberg
0 Comments
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Awareness about the Affordable Care Act remains low. Millions of dollars in new federal grants are part of an effort to change that.

Marco Rubio: Poster Boy For The GOP Identity Crisis

July 10
Mara Liasson / NPR
0 Comments
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The Republican Party seems like two parties these days. In the Senate, Republicans joined a two-thirds majority to pass an immigration bill. But in the House, Republicans are balking.

Summer 'Heat Tourists' Sweat With Smiles In Death Valley

July 10
Kirk Siegler / NPR
0 Comments
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It's no secret that Death Valley, Calif., is one of the hottest, most unforgiving places on Earth come summertime. July 10 is the 100th anniversary of the hottest temperature ever recorded on the planet -- 134 degrees Fahrenheit -- and the heat is drawing tourists from all over the world to Death Valley.

Bros Get Wasted; Girls Get Tipsy: Why Boozy Talk Matters

July 10
Nancy Shute / NPR
0 Comments
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Guys can really get hammered, can't they? I mean, totally trashed. Not me. I may have gotten a little buzzed at that birthday party, but that's it.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Pleads Not Guilty To 30 Federal Counts In Boston

July 10
Bill Chappell / NPR
0 Comments
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Appearing in the same Boston federal courtroom as many of the victims of the bombings at the Boston Marathon, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to 30 counts Wednesday, during an arraignment hearing.

In A First, Unmanned Navy Jet Lands On Aircraft Carrier

July 10
Larry Abramson / NPR
0 Comments
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The U.S. Navy completed the first-ever landing of an unmanned aerial vehicle on an aircraft carrier today. The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air system landed on the deck of the USS George H.W. Bush off the coast of Virginia. The X-47B is an experimental flying wing with a UFO-like profile.

U.S. Job Market Seen As X Factor In Fed's Stimulus Plans

July 10
Bill Chappell / NPR
0 Comments
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The Federal Reserve must ensure the U.S. job market is in full health before it begins to ease its aggressive bond-purchasing program, its top officials said at the Fed's latest policy meeting. This afternoon, the central bank released the minutes of the Federal Open Market Committee meeting of June 18 and 19.

California National Guard Sending Recruiters To San Diego Pride

July 10
By Beth Ford Roth
1 Comment
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The California National Guard has announced it will send recruiters to the San Diego LGBT Pride Festival and Parade this weekend. In addition, the Navy has granted permission to its Sailors to wear their uniforms at the festival, and the Marine I Expeditionary Force has given the OK as well.

Smithfield Says Pork Won't Change, But Some Aren't Buying It

July 10
Marilyn Geewax / NPR
0 Comments
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Americans will get the same ham slabs and bacon slices they have enjoyed for generations, even after Smithfield Foods becomes a Chinese subsidiary, Smithfield CEO Larry Pope told Congress on Wednesday.

San Diego County Analyzes Programs For The Severely Mentally Ill

July 10
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
0 Comments
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Laura's Law is back on the table. The county has issued a report that compares voluntary and mandatory programs for those suffering from a mental illness. It's a key issue in cases where people pose a threat to themselves or others.

Antiques Roadshow: Retrospective

July 10
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Antiques Roadshow: Retrospective  Tease photo

In this special edition, Fiona Bruce reflects on another remarkable series of finds over the last six months and updates many of the most talked about items to have appeared on the show. There’s an exciting development too on the experts quest to find some of the most wanted missing antiques. Following an appeal on the show one viewer thinks she may have found one of the rarest pieces of missing jewellery in the UK. Has she?

Midday Movies: What Is Kaiju?

July 10
Midday Edition
0 Comments
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Guillermo Del Toro's "Pacific Rim" opens on Friday and serves up a Western take on kaiju or giant monsters. But kaiju has a long history in Japan.

As Zimmerman Trial Nears End, Race 'Permeates The Case'

July 10
Mark Memmott / NPR
0 Comments
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The defense is expected to wrap up its case Wednesday afternoon at the murder trial of George Zimmerman, the Florida neighborhood watch volunteer accused in the February 2012 shooting death of teenager Trayvon Martin.

DogTV, The Channel For Stay-At-Home Pups, Is Going National

July 10
Mark Memmott / NPR
0 Comments
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DogTV, which launched online in Southern California last year, says it's going national on DirecTV starting Aug. 1.

Court May Reinstate Camp Pendleton Marine's Murder Conviction In Hamdania Case

July 10
By Beth Ford Roth
0 Comments
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Prosecutors have asked the military court that threw out the murder conviction of Camp Pendleton Marine Lawrence Hutchins III to reconsider reinstating it.

POV: Only The Young

July 10
2 Comments
POV: Only The Young Tease photo

Follow three unconventional Christian teenagers coming of age in a small Southern California town. Skateboarders Garrison and Kevin, and Garrison’s on-and-off girlfriend, Skye, wrestle with the eternal questions of youth: friendship, true love and the promise of the future. Yet their lives are also touched by the distress signals of contemporary America — foreclosed homes, abandoned businesses and adults in financial trouble. As graduation approaches, these become shocking realities.

Despite Youth Support, Democrats Having A Senior Moment

July 10
Alan Greenblatt / NPR
0 Comments
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Democrats aren't getting any younger. At least, their top leaders aren't.

White House Honors For Frank Deford, Joan Didion & Others

July 10
Mark Memmott / NPR
0 Comments
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Forgive us for pointing first to someone with an NPR connection, but we figure his fans will want to know that Morning Edition commentator Frank Deford is among those being honored Wednesday afternoon at the White House.

Tears, Applause Flow Freely At Firefighters' Memorial

July 10
By Nick Blumberg
0 Comments
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Just days after 19 sons and husbands were killed on the job in Yarnell, people from around the country came together for a massive public memorial.

Catholics Split Again On Coverage For Birth Control

July 10
Julie Rovner / NPR
0 Comments

Two prominent Catholic groups are finding themselves, once again, on opposite sides of a key issue regarding the Affordable Care Act.

Apple Conspired To Set E-Book Prices, Judge Rules

July 10
Mark Memmott / NPR
0 Comments
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Apple Inc. "conspired to raise the retail price of e-books," a federal judge ruled Wednesday as a civil lawsuit brought by the Justice Department reached its conclusion.

Tax Break Can Help With Health Coverage, But There's A Catch

July 10
Michelle Andrews / NPR
0 Comments
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There are two kinds of financial help for people planning to enroll in the online health insurance marketplaces that will open this fall. One could put people at risk of having to pay some of the money back, while the other won't.

VIDEO: Rare Clip Reveals Roosevelt's Use Of Wheelchair

July 10
Mark Memmott / NPR
0 Comments
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The press and the president's aides kept Franklin D. Roosevelt's use of a wheelchair hidden from most of the public during his more than 12 years as the nation's leader.

Fighting Crime Near Market Creek Plaza

July 10
By Claire Trageser
3 Comments
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Ever since it opened more than 10 years ago, the plaza has been an asset to its community, but neighbors say it also attracts crime.

SD Chariot Fire

July 10
City News Service
0 Comments

MOUNT LAGUNA (CNS) - Thousands of ground and airborne personnel worked today to finish off a largely extinguished East County highland wildfire that charred about 7,055 acres and destroyed scores of mountain cabins and other structures southeast of Julian.

Boston Bombings Suspect To Appear, Survivors To Be In Court

July 10
Mark Memmott / NPR
0 Comments
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Survivors of the explosions that killed three people and wounded more than 260 are expected to be in the room, The Associated Press reports. So are relatives of those killed and wounded.

Investors Brace For News Out Of Fed Minutes

July 10
Doreen McCallister / NPR
0 Comments
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After the Federal Open Market Committee meeting last month, the financial markets "freaked out," according to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.

How Oregon Is Getting 'Frequent Fliers' Out Of The ER

July 10
Kristian Foden-Vencil / NPR
0 Comments
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Forty-year-old Jeremie Seals has had a tough life.

Banjo Billy's Bus Tour: History, Mystery And Bad Jokes

July 10
Grace Hood / NPR
0 Comments
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The rambling, funky ride called Banjo Billy's Bus Tours, in Boulder, Colo., is equal parts history, crime stories and comedy. It's all woven together by John Georgis -- better known as Banjo Billy -- in a playful, "choose your own adventure" style.

In Montana Wilds, An Unlikely Alliance To Save The Sage Grouse

July 10
Christopher Joyce / NPR
0 Comments
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As its name implies, the sage grouse lives in sagebrush country, the rolling hills of knee-high scrub that's the common backdrop in movie Westerns. Pristine sagebrush is disappearing, however, and so are the birds. Biologists want to protect the sage grouse, but without starting a 21st century range war over it. So they've undertaken a grand experiment in the American West, to keep the grouse happy, as well as cattle ranchers and the energy industry.