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Stories for June 17, 2013

California Implementing New Way of Teaching

June 17
Katie Orr, Capital Public Radio
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The days of tedious memorization and multiple choice tests may soon be a thing of the past for California students. The state is beginning to implement an entirely new way of teaching known as the common core curriculum.

USNA Football Players To Be Charged In Sex Assault Case

June 17
Bill Chappell / NPR

Three U.S. Naval Academy football players will face charges in the alleged rape of a female midshipman in 2012, according to reports. Officials at the school, which is governed by military law, say they will send the case to Article 32 proceedings, which could then lead to a court-martial. A date has not been set for the hearings.

Supreme Court Strikes Down Arizona Voting Law

June 17
Nina Totenberg / NPR

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struck down a state-mandated requirement that prospective voters in Arizona provide proof of citizenship to be able to register to vote in national elections. But some experts are concerned that the court may have inserted a few "poison pills" in its opinion that would damage voting-rights protections someday down the road.

Moving Some San Diego City Departments Estimated To Save $7M

June 17
City News Service
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The City Council Monday unanimously approved a move of around 400 municipal employees from one downtown office tower to another, which is expected to save between $5 million to $7 million over the next five years.

Budget Bill Threatens Public Records Access In California

June 17
By Alison St John
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An amendment added to a state budget trailer puts access to public records at risk.

Obama Would Veto House's Farm Bill, White House Says

June 17
Bill Chappell / NPR

President Obama will be advised to veto a multi-year farm bill slated to be discussed in the House this week, the White House says. The administration issued a statement on the legislation Monday afternoon, criticizing it for cutting food programs for the poor.

Voting Rights Groups Get High Court Win As Bigger Case Looms

June 17
Frank James / NPR
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Advocates of tougher voter registration standards have racked up wins in recent years -- voter ID laws have taken hold across the nation, for example.

Encinitas' Proposition A Attracts Thousands In Last-Minute Contributions

June 17
By Alison St John
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Prop A, a voter initiative in Encinitas, has attracted thousands of dollars in last-minute contributions. The result of Tuesday's special election on what's known as the “right-to-vote initiative" will affect future development in the coastal community.

Woman Freed In Indiana Was A Convict On Death Row At 16

June 17
Bill Chappell / NPR
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Paula Cooper, 43, left prison Monday morning, decades after she became America's youngest resident of death row at age 16. She had confessed to the 1985 murder of Bible studies teacher Ruth Pelke, 78, in Gary, Ind. Cooper's death sentence was commuted in 1989, after widespread appeals for mercy.

KPBS' Roundtable To Air On TV

June 17
By KPBS

KPBS will bring the popular Roundtable radio discussion heard on KPBS Midday Edition to a television audience. The move adds a 6th day of local TV news programming to the KPBS TV schedule and brings the show to a larger and more diverse audience than radio alone. The first TV broadcast airs Friday, June 28th at 8:30 p.m.

FTC Can Sue Firms In 'Pay For Delay' Drug Deals, Court Rules

June 17
Bill Chappell / NPR
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When the maker of a brand-name drug pays a maker of generic drugs to not produce a lower-priced version of their product, the Federal Trade Commission can challenge the arrangement on antitrust grounds, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The ruling may end the era of what regulators call "pay-for-delay" deals.

FTA Looking Into North County Transit District

June 17
By Brad Racino
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This afternoon, the Federal Transit Administration — the federal agency that grants transportation agencies money and oversees how that money is spent — confirmed it is now actively looking into San Diego’s North County Transit District (NCTD).

Tomlinson Hill

June 17
Midday Edition
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"Tomlinson Hill" is the story of America, as seen through the microcosm of a small Texas town called Marlin. The film takes its name from the former Texas slave plantation that at one time defined this region. We trace this story through the eyes of two descendants - one black - Loreane Tomlinson; and one white - Chris Tomlinson, who independently come back for very different reasons to find their crumbling community still struggling under the weight of 150 years of class separation.

Director Of ICE Resigns

June 17
By John Rosman
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John Morton, the Director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, is resigning.

Ex-Navy SEAL Jesse Ventura Wants To Sue Chris Kyle's Widow

June 17
By Beth Ford Roth
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Ex-Navy SEAL Jesse Ventura filed a defamation lawsuit in 2012 against "American Sniper" Chris Kyle over an alleged bar fight in Coronado seven years ago. Today Ventura's attorneys asked a federal judge to make Kyle's widow Taya Kyle the new defendant in the case.

When Sibling Fights Go Beyond Harmless Kid Stuff

June 17
Nancy Shute / NPR

I'll never forget the time my big brother sank his fork in the back of my hand after I snitched food off his plate.

United Way: San Diego Families Struggling To Make Ends Meet

June 17
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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The United Way has compiled some hard facts about what families and individuals are dealing with when it comes to paying bills, getting transportation and taking care of their kids.

Majority Of Troops Who Commited Suicide Never Saw Combat

June 17
By Beth Ford Roth
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The latest suicide statistics from the Department of Defense show 52 percent of troops who took their own lives between 2008 and 2011 were never deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Roughly 34 percent who committed suicide were deployed, but didn't see combat.

WWII 'Deserters': Stories Of Men Who Left The Front Lines

June 17
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Few citizens are more honored than military veterans, and there's particular reverence for those who defeated the Nazis in World War II. Like any war, however, World War II was complicated and traumatic for those on the ground, and not a few deserted from the front lines.

INDEPENDENT LENS: The Revolutionary Optimists

June 17
INDEPENDENT LENS: The Revolutionary Optimists Tease photo

Amlan Ganguly is a lawyer-turned-social entrepreneur who has transformed some of the poorest slums of Kolkata by empowering children to become leaders in improving health and sanitation. Using street theater, dance and data as their weapons, the children have cut malaria and diarrhea rates in half, increased polio vaccination rates and turned garbage dumps into playing fields. Instead of feeling powerless and doomed to perpetuate the cycle of poverty, these children are developing the tools and attitudes to create opportunities for themselves and their communities.

US To Leave Missiles, Jets Behind In Jordan After Military Exercise (Video)

June 17
By Beth Ford Roth
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The U.S. troops currently in Jordan participating in the military exercise Eager Lion plan to leave the country Thursday when the training ends. But the Pentagon says they'll be leaving behind a detachment of F-16s and U.S. Patriot missiles at Jordan's request.

High Court Strikes Ariz. Voting Law Requiring Proof Of Citizenship

June 17
Eyder Peralta / NPR
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The Supreme Court is looking to make the final stretch of the 2012 term a dramatic one: While the justices knocked out five opinions today, none of them were the major ones we've been looking forward to. As we've told you before, we're waiting for:

Supreme Court Rules Arizona Citizenship Proof Law Illegal

June 17
Associated Press
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The Supreme Court ruled Monday that states cannot on their own require would-be voters to prove they are U.S. citizens before using a federal registration system designed to make signing up easier.

Brown Has Veto Options With New State Budget

June 17
Katie Orr, Capital Public Radio
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The California legislature finished up its work on the state budget over the weekend - but spending levels aren't set in stone yet. Governor Jerry Brown has until the middle of next week to sign the budget and issue any line-item vetoes.

Court: 'Pay To Delay' Generic Drugs Can Be Illegal

June 17
Associated Press
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The Supreme Court says deals between pharmaceutical corporations and their generic drug competitors, which government officials say keep cheaper forms of medicine off the market, can sometimes be illegal.

Mello-Roos Law Allows Vote Of One To Decide On New Taxes

June 17
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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inewsource breaks down the Mello-Ross tax law and explains how one person, sometimes a developer, can be the sole voter deciding on new taxes.

Navy Veteran James Kimber Hopes To Unseat Hunter In 50th

June 17
By Claire Trageser
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It may feel like election season just ended, but a new round of Congressional candidates are already gearing up for the June 2014 election.

Schools Will See More Dollars, New Funding System

June 17
Midday Edition
By Kyla Calvert
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San Diego County school districts will now have to learn to manage budgets under a new system.

LA County Bus Drivers Complain Over Pesticides

June 17
Associated Press

Some Los Angeles County bus drivers say they're sick of pesticides sprayed in their buses -- literally.

'Guardian': Documents Show Britain, U.S. Spied At World Summits

June 17
Eyder Peralta / NPR
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The Edward Snowden saga continues: Last night, citing classified documents leaked by the former Booz Allen Hamilton employee, The Guardian newspaper reported that the United States and the United Kingdom spied on their allies during the 2009 G-20 global summit meetings in England.

Brush Fire Closes Most Of Mission Trails Regional Park

June 17
City News Service

Part of state Route 52 and all trails at Mission Trails Regional Park expect for Cowles Mountain were closed today due to a Father's Day brush fire that scorched more than 100 acres in the 5,800-acre park.

Judge considers effect of fungus on Calif. inmates

June 17
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- A lawyer representing inmates at two California state prisons told a federal judge Monday that an airborne fungus occurring in the San Joaquin Valley presents the deadly threat of valley fever and that thousands should be transferred immediately.

Wisconsin's Walker Downplays Presidential Buzz

June 17
Shawn Johnson / NPR
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A little more than a year ago, Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker survived a recall election after an epic battle with unions that gave him folk-hero status with many conservatives. Some political observers now consider him a presidential contender.

Visa Exchange Program Draws Scrutiny Under Immigration Bill

June 17
Kaomi Goetz / NPR
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Landing a job at a summer camp or at an amusement park is a rite of passage for many young Americans. Those jobs also appeal to foreigners participating in a cultural exchange using J-1 visas. But with U.S. youth unemployment at 25 percent, Congress is now taking a close look at the J-1 visa exchange program.