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Stories for March 10, 2013

Temporary Bus Lines Announced After Sprinter Light Rail Shuts Down

March 10
City News Service
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Two temporary bus lines will shuttle passengers across North County for the next two-to-four months, as light rail passenger service on Sprinter trains will be disrupted due to emergency brake repairs, transit agency officials said today.

Man Falls Down 35-Foot Well In San Diego County

March 10
AP / Associated Press

EL CAJON, Calif. (AP) -- Officials in San Diego County say a 42-year-old man fell to the bottom of a 35-foot well where he spent two hours before being pulled out unconscious.

Solitary Confinement: Punishment Or Cruelty?

March 10
NPR Staff / NPR
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An estimated 80,000 American prisoners spend 23 hours a day in closed isolation units for 10, 20 or even more than 30 years.

Are There Too Many PhDs And Not Enough Jobs?

March 10

Our country needs more people with science, math, and engineering degrees -- at least, that is common refrain among politicians and educators.

Once On Death Row, He Now Fights To Defeat The Death Penalty

March 10
Margot Adler / NPR
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Maryland is about to become the 18th state to abolish the death penalty.

Despite Warnings, Border Waits Not Longer Than Usual

March 10
By Jill Replogle
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Under sequestration, U.S. Customs and Border Protection is slated to have $500 million slashed from its budget. Border authorities warn this is already making for longer waits. But their warnings don’t seem to pan out.

When Rand Paul Ended Filibuster, He Left Drones On National Stage

March 10
Carrie Johnson / NPR
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Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky launched a nationwide conversation last week with his 13-hour filibuster of the president's nominee to lead the CIA.

Poi: Hawaii's Recipe For Revitalizing Island Culture

March 10
Sandy Hausman / NPR
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There are only about 1,000 people of pure Hawaiian descent left in the world, but island residents are cooking up an idea to keep native island culture from fading away. The key ingredient? Reviving a starchy food called poi.