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Stories for May 8, 2013

Ramona Teachers Vote to Strike 'When and If It Becomes Necessary'

May 8
Melissa Phy

The Ramona Teachers Association "overwhelming approved" a strike authorization vote Wednesday, with more than three-quarters of the members in favor of calling a walkout "when and if it becomes necessary."

City Council Not On Board With Filner's Proposed City Attorney Cuts

May 8
By Claire Trageser and City News Service
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A proposed $1.4 million spending reduction in the office of San Diego City Attorney Jan Goldsmith failed to find broad support on the City Council today during a review of Mayor Bob Filner's budget proposal.

Do GOP's Benghazi Charges Harm Hillary Clinton In 2016?

May 8
Frank James / NPR
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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton hasn't said whether or not she's running for president in 2016. Indeed, if her husband, President Clinton, is to be believed, she hasn't even told him of her intentions.

New Test Unveiled In San Diego Could Change Prostate Cancer Treatment

May 8
By David Wagner
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By telling doctors how aggressive a patient's prostate cancer is, a new test could help more men decide to forgo aggressive — and sometimes unnecessary — treatments.

Bombing Suspect's Widow Hires New Lawyer

May 8
Scott Neuman / NPR
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Katherine Russell, the widow of Boston bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, has added an attorney experienced with terrorism cases to her legal team, according to The Associated Press.

Two California Children Get Innovative Device To Treat Spinal Problems

May 8
By Kenny Goldberg
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Two California children have been implanted with a magnetic device that promises to revolutionize the way curvature of the spine is treated in young people.

Romney Meets With Filner, Agrees To Help Olympics Bid

May 8
City News Service
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Former presidential candidate Mitt Romney has agreed to help San Diego and Tijuana make a binational bid for the 2024 Olympics, San Diego Mayor Bob Filner said today.

U.S. Airman From Santee Continues Climb To Everest

May 8
By Beth Ford Roth
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U.S. Air Force Capt. Colin Merrin, a GPS satellite operations mission commander from Santee, is a step closer to fulfilling his dream of summiting Mount Everest.

Burt Lancaster: Daring To Reach

May 8
Burt Lancaster: Daring To Reach  Tease photo

Burt Lancaster went from street-wise tough to art-collector liberal-activist, from circus-acrobat hunk to Academy Award winner. By age 18, Burt was 6'2" and blessed with the athletic physique and dynamic good looks that helped make him famous. A stint in the Army introduced Burt to acting and led him to Hollywood where his first release, "The Killers" (1946), propelled him to stardom at age 32. He took control of his own career and seldom faltered.

Homebrewing: Soon To Be Legal In All 50 States

May 8
Bill Chappell / NPR
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The Alabama legislature has approved a bill making it legal to brew beer at home, a practice that had been forbidden in the state. If Gov. Robert Bentley signs the bill, as is expected, homebrewing will soon be legal in all 50 states.

Enron's Jeffrey Skilling May See Sentence Reduced

May 8
Krishnadev Calamur / NPR
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Former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling could have his more than 24-year prison sentence reduced by as many as 10 years under a deal announced Wednesday by the Justice Department.

Census: Black Voting Surpassed White in 2012

May 8
Matt Stiles / NPR
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Black voters showed up at the polls at higher rates than whites in last year's presidential election, driving the rate of minority participation to historic levels, a new government report shows.

Push To End Teens' Distracted Driving Targets Parents, Peers

May 8
Brian Naylor / NPR
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The statistics are grim: Highway crashes are the leading cause of death for young Americans. While such fatalities had declined in recent years, overall highway deaths were up last year. Deaths of 16- and 17-year-olds increased nearly 20 percent from the previous year, based on preliminary data.

Jodi Arias Found Guilty In Murder Of Boyfriend

May 8
Scott Neuman / NPR
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Jurors on Wednesday found Jodi Arias, accused of killing her one-time boyfriend in a fit of rage, guilty of first-degree murder.

Teen Charged With Homicide After Death Of Soccer Referee

May 8
Howard Berkes / NPR

The 17-year-old soccer goalie who allegedly punched and killed a referee during a game in Utah last month faces a charge of "homicide by assault" and may be tried as an adult.

Zahau Family Files Suit Seeking Homicide Evidence

May 8
City News Service
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Family of Rebecca Zahau Files Lawsuit Seeking Evidence That She Was Victim of Homicide, Not Suicide

Carnival Triumph Heads Back To Gulf Of Mexico, Under Power

May 8
Bill Chappell / NPR
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The Carnival Cruise ship Triumph is traveling again, having left the terminal in Mobile, Ala., where it was forced to dock in February after severe problems with its engines led to its being towed across the Gulf of Mexico.

Wildfire Awareness Week Comes With Dire Warnings For San Diego

May 8
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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Dire predictions are being made by state officials about this year's fire season. Cal Fire in San Diego went to peak staffing this week, a month ahead of schedule, to prepare for a dangerous fire season.

San Diego County's Proposed $5 Billion Budget Goes Before The Public

May 8
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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San Diego's County Board of Supervisors voted to begin public hearings on a proposed $5 billion budget for the next fiscal year. We break it down with Supervisor Greg Cox.

Air Force Strips 17 Officers Of Nuclear Missile Launch Authority

May 8
Scott Neuman / NPR
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Seventeen Air Force officers with control over nuclear missiles have had that authority suspended after receiving poor reviews on their mastery of launch operations, The Associated Press reports in an exclusive.

Nearly Three Years After Dodd-Frank, Reforms Happen Slowly

May 8
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On July 21, 2010, President Obama signed into law the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, commonly known as the Dodd-Frank bill. Reporter Gary Rivlin says "the passage of Dodd-Frank was something of a miracle." But to the chief lobbyist for the Financial Services Roundtable, a lobbying group that represents 100 of the country's largest financial institutions, it was just "halftime."

Sequestration Will Hurt Firefighting Ability, Says California National Guard (Video)

May 8
By Beth Ford Roth
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The California National Guard has played a key role in fighting the fires burning throughout the state. But Major General David Baldwin says the Guard's ability to fight future fires will be hampered by sequestration cuts.

Police Chief: 'We Are Not Barbarians;' Bury Bombing Suspect

May 8
Mark Memmott / NPR

Saying that "we are not barbarians, we bury the dead," the police chief of Worcester, Mass., on Wednesday appealed for someone in authority to clear the way for the body of Boston Marathon bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev to be buried.

Boquillas Border Crossing Could Be Boon For Texas Town

May 8
Lorne Matalon
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A long-awaited border crossing has re-opened at Big Bend National Park. Across the Rio Grande, the tiny village of Boquillas is hoping for an influx of American tourists.

Poll: Obama Approval Up, Effectiveness Down; GOP In Doldrums

May 8
Liz Halloran / NPR

President Obama's job approval has inched up in recent weeks, but the percentage of Americans who say they believe he is effective has taken a hit, according to a Pew Research Center survey released Wednesday.

Zahau Family Expected To File Suit Against San Diego Sheriff's Dept.

May 8
10 News
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The attorney for the family of Rebecca Zahau, who mysteriously died at the Spreckles Mansion in Coronado nearly two years ago, will announce Wednesday plans to keep her death investigation alive.

Preemie Researchers Were Purposely Given Wrong Data, Group Says

May 8
Ken Stone

UCSD Medical Center and Sharp Mary Birch Hospital purposely used oxygen monitors fixed to give erroneous readings as part of a nationwide study involving extremely premature infants, a consumer-advocacy group says.

Ex-Camp Pendleton Marine Jailed In Iran Sends Letters Home

May 8
By Beth Ford Roth
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For the first time in the more than 600 days that Camp Pendleton Marine veteran Amir Hekmati has been held captive in Iran, he was able to send letters to his family in the United States.

Naval Base Coronado Scores Top Defense Dept. Environmental Award

May 8
Patch San Diego
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Naval Base Coronado received a top national honor from Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel for its approach to dealing with threatened species at Naval Air Station North Island and seven other locations.

Cities, Counties Get $7 Million To Enforce Tire Waste Laws

May 8
Steve Milne, Capital Public Radio

The state is giving money to more than 40 cities and counties in California to fight illegal dumping and storage of old tires.

Brown Proposing Changes to Prop 65

May 8
Katie Orr, Capital Public Radio

Governor Jerry Brown wants to update a California law designed to keep you informed about potentially hazardous chemicals in the air.

Steinberg: Addressing Mental Health Can Reduce Prison Overcrowding

May 8
Ben Adler, Capital Public Radio

California Senate Leader Darrell Steinberg is proposing several measures intended to increase crisis access to mental health services.

Survey Finds Many Latinos Reluctant To Contact Police

May 8
By Jude Joffe-Block
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The survey questioned Latinos' perception of police in the counties surrounding Phoenix, Los Angeles, Houston and Chicago.

Head Of Environmental Crimes Unit Is Leaving Government

May 8
Carrie Johnson / NPR
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Assistant U.S. Attorney General Ignacia Moreno, the point person at the Justice Department for prosecuting environmental crimes, says she will leave government service next month.

Cleveland Kidnappings: Wednesday's Developments

May 8
Mark Memmott / NPR
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We're following the latest news about the three young women who were rescued Monday from a home in Cleveland where authorities suspect they had been held captive for about a decade, and the investigation into what happened to them.

With Gorgeous Dorms But Little Cash, Colleges Must Adapt

May 8
NPR Staff / NPR
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Many high school seniors who are heading to college this fall have just paid their tuition deposits -- the first real taste of what the college experience is going to cost them. These students are heading to school at a time that some consider a transformative moment for American colleges and universities. Costs are skyrocketing, and there are some real questions about what value college students are getting for their money.

Congress Considers How To Deflate Nation's Helium Reserve

May 8
Ailsa Chang / NPR
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The Senate is considering legislation to prevent a global helium shortage from worsening in October. That's when one huge supply of helium in the U.S. is set to terminate. The House overwhelmingly passed its own bill last month to keep the Federal Helium Program going.