skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

Military Moms: A Bond Borne From Shared Loss

Sally Edwards, 80, (left) and Lue Hutchinson, 71, visited StoryCorps in Cincinnati. Their sons, Jack Edwards and Tom Butts, are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Audio

Aired 5/23/13

In 1991, Kentucky residents Sally Edwards and Lue Hutchinson had sons serving in the Gulf War. Sally Edwards' son, Jack, was a Marine captain. Lue's son, Tom Butts, was a staff sergeant in the Army. The two men never knew each other, but today, their mothers are best friends.

Both soldiers were killed in February of 1991. Jack was 34. "They were the cover for a medical mission. The helicopter lost its top rotor blade, and they didn't make it back," Sally says.

After Lue's son Tom joined the Army in 1979, "he did something absolutely stupid: He learned how to jump out of perfectly good airplanes," she says. "But he loved it," She learned he died the last day of the war. He was 31.

"I worked in Wal-Mart, and we found out the war had ended. I was ecstatic when I went home and came home to a driveway full of cars. Not knowing at that time, until my stepson came out, and told me Tommy was gone," she says.

His death was in the newspaper, and Sally saw it.

"I wanted somebody to talk to because it wasn't like World War II and Vietnam when everybody had a neighbor who'd lost somebody, so I wrote to you. I thought if you responded maybe I'd have somebody that I could talk to about how you felt and how I felt." Sally says.

The letter, Lue says, spoke to her. "Those words 'If you need help and you want to talk, I'm here,' and that's what I needed."

And that's what Sally needed, too, she says, or else she wouldn't have reached out. "The last 22 years would have been hell without you, Lue."

"It would have been hell without you, too," Lue says.

"Because what's in our hearts we share," Sally says.

"When you're the mother and your child dies in that horrific way, the memory gets tolerable but never really, really goes away," Lue says.

"I don't know what I would do if on a bad day, I couldn't pick up and the phone and call you and share it," Sally says.

"Neither could I."

Audio produced for Morning Edition by Katie Simon.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit www.npr.org.

We've upgraded to a better commenting experience!
Log in with your social profile or create a Disqus account.

Please stay on topic and be as concise as possible. Leaving a comment means you agree to our Community Discussion Rules. We like civilized discourse. We don't like spam, lying, profanity, harassment or personal attacks.

comments powered by Disqus