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Stories for October 1, 2013

Members Of Congress Begin To Forfeit Pay In Response To Shutdown

Oct. 1
Joey Palacios / Fronteras Desk
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The federal government has shut down, causing thousands of government workers to go without pay for its duration.

Pieces Of Immigration System Affected By Government Shutdown

Oct. 1
Michel Marizco / Fronteras Desk
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Most of the country's immigration courts are either closed or working limited schedules because of the United States government's shutdown. That means some immigration court decisions could be delayed for months.

Online Enrollment For Obamacare In California Flooded Despite Government Shutdown

Oct. 1
By Dwane Brown
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Covered California spokesman says goal is to register 2 million of the 5 million people without health insurance in state.

San Diego Parks Feel Impact Of Federal Shutdown

Oct. 1
Midday Edition

The federal shutdown has affected local parks in a variety of ways. Marney Cox, chief economist for the San Diego Association of Governments, will tell us where else the shutdown's effects are being felt in San Diego.

The Shutdown's Squeeze On Science And Health

Oct. 1
NPR Staff / NPR

In addition to shutdowns of national parks (including Alcatraz Island and Yosemite) and the supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children, the mandatory furloughs are affecting a wide range of government science and health agencies. Here's a snapshot:

Shutdown Diary: War Of Words, And A Victory For Some WWII Vets

Oct. 1
Frank James / NPR
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Day 1 of the federal government shutdown, 2013 edition, was business as usual, at least when it came to each side trying to win the message war and keep the pressure on the political opposition in the hope of getting them to blink first.

Scenes Of A Shutdown: A Synagogue Hosts Furloughed Workers

Oct. 1
Christina Cauterucci / NPR
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As more than 800,000 government employees were sent home this morning, the staff at Washington, D.C.'s Sixth & I Historic Synagogue opened "Shutdown Central," a gathering space for furloughed locals to work and play.

Texas Reaching Out To Provide Voter IDs

Oct. 1
Joey Palacios / Fronteras Desk

SAN ANTONIO - As Texas inches closer to a statewide election in November, officials are reaching out to people without proper identification. Citizens without an ID can apply for an election certificate starting this week.

Congressional Impasse Leaves Museums Empty, Monuments Shut

Oct. 1
Elizabeth Blair / NPR
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Federal bureaucracies aren't the only ones scaling back operations during the government shutdown. It's also meant that kids couldn't take field trips to the Smithsonian.

In Florida, Insurer And Nonprofits Work On Enrollment

Oct. 1
Greg Allen / NPR
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Florida Gov. Rick Scott and other Republican leaders have worked to block the Affordable Care Act since it was first proposed.

New Maryland Firearms Law Rides In On A Wave Of Gun Sales

Oct. 1
Jacob Fenston / NPR
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One of the strictest gun laws in the nation went into effect in Maryland on Tuesday. The new law bans assault rifles and high-capacity magazines, and it makes Maryland one of only six states that require handgun purchasers to get fingerprinted and take gun safety courses.

First Step In Health Exchange Enrollment: Train The Helpers

Oct. 1
Julie Rovner / NPR
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Even as the Affordable Care Act's new health exchanges open for business, polls show the public is still pretty confused about how they're supposed to work.

For Middle-Aged Women, Stress May Raise Alzheimer's Risk

Oct. 1
Nancy Shute / NPR

Like most middle-aged women, I am stressed out. The work, the family, the aging parents -- all things that jolt me awake at 3 a.m.

Puberty Is Coming Earlier, But That Doesn't Mean Sex Ed Is

Oct. 1
Donisha Dansby / NPR
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For kids growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area, there's a standard introduction to puberty at many schools: an educational play called Nightmare on Puberty Street.

A Rapid Shift For Jews Away From Religion, But Not Jewishness

Oct. 1
Gene Demby / NPR
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A big survey by the Pew Center is out today on Jewish life in America, and it shows a stark shift away from religious belief and toward cultural identification.

Shutdown Leaves Program Feeding Women And Infants In Lurch

Oct. 1
Eliza Barclay and Allison Aubrey / NPR
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Among those affected by the chaos of the government shutdown are 9 million low-income women and children who may be worrying where next week's meal is going to come from.

Agency Websites Shut Down With The Government

Oct. 1
Elise Hu / NPR

If you or your child has a school report due tomorrow, the Census Bureau site will not be available to help. Census.gov and its affiliates, like American FactFinder and online surveys, are offline as part of the federal government's shutdown. The same goes for the Federal Trade Commission's site, the Agriculture Department's USDA.gov and the Library of Congress' site, which can also be a rich resource of reference information.

Reporting On The Shutdown ... One Facebook Post At A Time

Oct. 1
Marilyn Geewax, Tell Me More Staff
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Shutting down the government is nothing new; Congress did it 18 years ago, suspending federal operations for three weeks.

The Frito Pie Flap

Oct. 1
Al Macias / Fronteras Desk
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With all the chaos in the capitol, another less-noticed issue has arisen in the Land of Enchantment.

Government Shutdown To Close San Diego-Area Military Commissaries On Wednesday

Oct. 1
By Beth Ford Roth
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Military commissaries on Camp Pendleton, MCAS Miramar, and Naval Base San Diego will all close Wednesday because of the government shutdown.

No Talks Underway To Resolve Shutdown

Oct. 1
Frank James / NPR
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If you're wondering how long the shutdown will last, well, don't hold your breath.

For Middle-Aged Women, Stress May Boost Alzheimer's Risk

Oct. 1
Nancy Shute / NPR

Like most middle-aged women, I am stressed out. The work, the family, the aging parents -- all things that jolt me awake at 3 a.m.

What Shutdown? WWII Vets Ignore Barricades To See Memorial

Oct. 1
Eyder Peralta / NPR
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Perhaps Congress can take a hint from these gentlemen:

Connecticut's Insurance Website Struggles At Opening

Oct. 1
Jeff Cohen / NPR
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Today is the day the uninsured can sign up for insurance on Connecticut's new health care exchange under the Affordable Care Act. But technical glitches have hampered the rollout.

Linda Bounds on Being Boundless

Disability Awareness Month 2013 Honoree

Oct. 1
By Monica Medina
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Linda Bounds is a petite, sprightly woman with a lot of heart and grit. No longer wanting to be defined by others, she began to pursue her passion, living life on her terms and doing what she loved most: art.

WWII Vets Knock Down Barriers To Visit Memorial Closed Due To Government Shutdown (Video)

Oct. 1
By Beth Ford Roth
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A group of World War II veterans visiting Washington D.C. from Mississippi weren't going to let a few fences get in the way of visiting the closed WWII memorial - closed because of the government shutdown.

California Health Exchange Opens For Enrollment

Oct. 1
Associated Press
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Californians who buy their own health insurance and those who have been hoping for coverage began using the state's online marketplace after it opened for business on the first day enrollment.

Al Kovach Finds A New Way To Serve His Country

Disability Awareness Month 2013 Honoree

Oct. 1
By Monica Medina
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Al Kovach, Jr., looks a lot like Steve McQueen. In fact, in his Navy days, he was known as Petty Officer McQueen, just because of his strong resemblance to the actor known as "The King of Cool."

Military Will Get Paid On Time Despite Government Shutdown (Video)

Oct. 1
By Beth Ford Roth
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Members of the U.S. military will still get paid, despite the government shutdown. In the waning hours of Monday evening, President Obama signed H.R. 3210, known as the Pay Our Military Act, which guarantees service members will get their paychecks on time during the shutdown.

Gov't Shutdown Could Harm California's Recovering Economy

Oct. 1
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

California programs and services wouldn’t take a big hit from a federal government shutdown, at least not at first. But state budget watchers still say California has a lot to lose from the standoff in Washington.

How Similar Is Obamacare To Medicare?

Oct. 1
Pauline Bartolone / Capital Public Radio
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Open enrollment for health coverage under the federal health law starts Tuesday. We’ll look at how the roll out of the Affordable Care Act compares to the last time the federal government made coverage available to millions.

Government Shutdown Means No NFL, MLB TV For Deployed Troops

Oct. 1
By Beth Ford Roth
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Troops stationed overseas, from Afghanistan to Japan, depend on American Forces Network to watch NFL and MLB games during deployments as a morale booster. But most AFN channels are now off the air due to the government shutdown.

Ex-Los Alamos Director Harold Agnew Dies

Oct. 1
Associated Press
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Harold Agnew, a former Los Alamos National Laboratory Director who worked on the Manhattan Project, died Sunday in Solano Beach. He was 92.

8 Great 'Shutdown Pickup Lines'

Oct. 1
Mark Memmott / NPR
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When a government shutdown loomed in 2011, the Twitterverse had some fun with #govtshutdownpickuplines.

300 Sandwiches The Secret To Boyfriend's Heart?

Oct. 1
NPR Staff / NPR
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What's it take to get a guy to put a ring on it? 300 sandwiches might just be the ticket for New York Post reporter Stephanie Smith's boyfriend.

Natural Area Closed As Fire Prevention Measure

Oct. 1
Associated Press

San Bernardino National Forest officials have taken the unusual step of closing a popular hiking and swimming area after finding evidence of dozens of illegal campfires.

The Mars Rover? That's Shut Down, Too

Oct. 1
Adam Wollner / NPR
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By now, you've probably heard that the federal government shut down at 12:01 a.m. ET Tuesday after members of Congress were unable to reach a budget agreement in time to keep the government funded.

Review: 'Don Jon'

Oct. 1
By Nathan John
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Joseph Gordon-Levitt's directorial quasi-debut opened September 27 through out San Diego. It's about love, sex, and porn. (You probably shouldn't read this at work.) Guest critic Nate John has a review.

Snowden Is A Finalist For A Top Human Rights Award

Oct. 1
Bill Chappell / NPR
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Edward Snowden, the former NSA contract worker who leaked documents detailing America's secret and broad surveillance activities, is on the short list of nominees for Europe's Sakharov Prize, which recognizes those who fight for human rights.

How San Diegans Will Feel The Government Shutdown

Oct. 1
Midday Edition
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From Washington D.C. to San Diego, a government shutdown will have far-reaching impacts.

Funding For California Clean Tech Shifts From Venture Capital

Oct. 1
By Erik Anderson
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The clean technology sector continues to create jobs in California, but how that is being paid for is changing

Who Should Pay For San Onofre?

Oct. 1
By Amita Sharma
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The California Public Utilities Commission is holding two public hearings Tuesday to help decide who will bear the costs of the defunct San Onofre nuclear power plant.

San Diego's Community Gardens Struggle For Water

Oct. 1
Bianca Bruno
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San Diego’s urban agriculture ordinance amendment made it easier for community groups to access land to plant their vegetables, but not necessarily to access the water needed to grow them.

After Colorado Rock Slide, Teams Struggle To Reach 5 Bodies

Oct. 1
Mark Memmott / NPR

Residents of Buena Vista, Colo., are in shock after a rock slide on Monday that authorities say killed five people -- possibly all from the same family.

NYC Police Studying Shocking Video Of Bikers Attacking Driver

Oct. 1
Mark Memmott / NPR

Frightening video of what happened Sunday in New York City when dozens of motorcyclists surrounded an SUV and then beat the driver is being studied by New York City police as they try to find and arrest the attackers.

No End In Sight As Government Shutdown Begins

Oct. 1
Mark Memmott / NPR
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With lawmakers in Washington at loggerheads over the same issues they've been arguing about for more than five years, the federal government has partially shut down.

After Shutdown, A Familiar Feeling At The White House

Oct. 1
Steve Inskeep / NPR
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President Obama spoke with NPR in the Oval Office on Monday, as a visiting group of young people in suits got a tour of the Rose Garden outside the windows. The most striking part of our encounter in this moment of crisis was how familiar the atmosphere seemed.

Unable To Stop Shutdown, Obama Pins Blame On GOP

Oct. 1
Alan Greenblatt / NPR
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President Obama says he's tired of the seemingly never-ending rounds of budget crises.

Lessons For The Obamacare Rollout, Courtesy Of Massachusetts

Oct. 1
Richard Knox / NPR

Today marks a milestone on the nation's long march toward universal health coverage: the launch of online marketplaces, called exchanges, designed to help people find insurance they can afford.