skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

Stories for October 14, 2013

One Roof, Many Generations: Redefining The Single-Family Home

Oct. 14
Peter O'Dowd / NPR

New homes are back in a big way -- literally. This summer, a typical new house in Phoenix was more than 20 percent larger than a resale home as builders across the country added more space to accommodate post-recession lifestyles.

Supreme Court Returns To Affirmative Action In Michigan Case

Oct. 14
Nina Totenberg / NPR
Tease photo

The U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue of affirmative action again Tuesday, but this time the question is not whether race may be considered as a factor in college admissions. Instead, this case tests whether voters can ban affirmative action programs through a referendum.

Silicon Valley Trailer Park Residents Fight To Stay

Oct. 14
Eric Westervelt / NPR

Sunny Palo Alto, Calif., is awash in multimillion-dollar homes, luxury Tesla electric cars and other financial fruits from a digital revolution the city helped spark. The Silicon Valley city is home to Stanford University, at least eight billionaires, and one mobile home park.

Most Living In Tijuana Canal Were Long-Term U.S. Residents

Oct. 14
By Jill Replogle
Tease photo

A Tijuana think tank recently surveyed 400 deportees living in the Tijuana River canal. Four out of ten lived in the U.S. for more than 15 years before being deported.

Could Wireless Charging Spell The End Of Battery Anxiety?

Oct. 14
By David Wagner
Tease photo

That feeling you get when your cell phone is just about to die has a name: "Battery anxiety." And wireless companies hope to soon make it a thing of the past, if they can put aside their differences.

NATURE: Saving Otter 501

Oct. 14
NATURE: Saving Otter 501 Tease photo

This is the story of the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s 501st attempt to save a stranded orphan otter. From her discovery as a newborn pup crying on the beach, through her rehabilitation in secret roof tanks atop the Monterey Bay Aquarium, follow Otter 501 as she learns how to survive in the wild. It is a tale of mysterious threats, persistent failures and small victories, where survival is a long shot at best. Throughout, Otter 501 acts as a lens. Her story reveals a previously unseen world of otter behavior and also acts to illuminate some of the most difficult ecological questions of our time: Do we have a responsibility to save species that hover on the edge?

Californian Officials Knew About Glitch Before Changes Delayed Jobless Checks

Oct. 14
Associated Press

California officials knew a computer upgrade for the state's unemployment insurance program was vulnerable to problems before it was installed.

Photos: KPBS Co-Hosts Debate Between Top Mayoral Candidates

Oct. 14
By Angela Carone
Tease photo

Just five weeks before the election, the top four San Diego mayoral candidates debated in front of a live audience at KPBS studios.

Thousands Of Miles From Shutdown, Mars Rovers Keep Working

Oct. 14
Bill Chappell / NPR
Tease photo

The budget negotiations in Washington are not front-page news on Mars. There, millions of miles away, NASA's rovers continue to operate, taking photographs and collecting data as they prepare for the coming Martian winter.

Gov. Brown Vetos Program For Medical Interpreters

Oct. 14
By Megan Burks

Gov. Jerry Brown has vetoed a bill to establish face-to-face interpretation at doctors’ offices and hospitals.

Al-Qaida Suspect Captured In Libya Will Be Tried In New York

Oct. 14
Bill Chappell / NPR

Abu Anas al-Libi, a suspected leader of al-Qaida who was seized by U.S. special forces during a raid in Libya earlier this month, is now on American soil and will face trial in New York on charges related to 1998 bombing attacks on two U.S. embassies in Africa, a U.S. official tells NPR's Carrie Johnson.

Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle

Oct. 14
By Jennifer Robinson
Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle  Tease photo

Join host and narrator Liev Schreiber to explore the dawn of the comic book genre and trace the evolution of the characters and their ongoing cultural impact worldwide. Chart the progression from the first comic books born during the Great Depression to the television debut of Superman in the 1950s, to the emergence of superheroes who reflect changing social mores in the 1960s and 70s, to today’s insatiable enthusiasm for superheroes embraced in all media and by all demographics.

Camp Pendleton Bans Supplement Linked To Liver Failure (Video)

Oct. 14
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

The dietary supplement OxyELITE has been banned from being sold at all Camp Pendleton base exchanges. The ban was triggered by a warning from the Centers for Disease Control that OxyELITE could cause acute hepatitis and liver failure.

This Isn't Your Granny Smith's Harvesting Technology

Oct. 14
Lindsey Smith / NPR
Tease photo

In West Michigan, it's apple harvest time. That may conjure up images of picturesque orchards and old-fashioned fun: growers harvesting apples and then selecting them by hand.

Lawsuit Against Convention Center Expansion Expected Soon

Oct. 14
By Claire Trageser
Lawsuit Against Convention Center Expansion Expected Soon Tease photo

Although the Convention Center expansion cleared its final regulatory hurdle last week, the project will not be breaking ground anytime soon.

A Night At The Rock: Former Alcatraz Inmate Journeys Back

Oct. 14
Laura Sullivan / NPR
Tease photo

For 29 years, Alcatraz -- the notorious prison off the coast of San Francisco -- housed some of the nation's worst criminals: Al Capone, Machine Gun Kelly, Birdman Robert Stroud.

Top Candidates Meet For San Diego Mayoral Debate

Oct. 14
By KPBS and City News Service
Tease photo

The top four mayoral candidates met Monday to debate in front of a live audience in the KPBS studio.

After Wading Through Hundreds Of Bills, Gov. Brown Clears His Desk

Oct. 14
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio
Tease photo

After signing nearly every bill to reach his desk this year, Gov. Jerry Brown used his veto much more frequently in recent days.

Collectible Art At Street Prices: Banksy Sells Pieces For $60

Oct. 14
Bill Chappell / NPR
Tease photo

New Yorkers who love a good bargain missed a golden opportunity Saturday, when the artist and provocateur Banksy, whose sly graffiti art adorns collectors' walls, opened a sidewalk kiosk in Central Park to sell his work for $60 apiece.

Congress Works On Holiday, Three Days Before Debt Deadline

Oct. 14
Bill Chappell / NPR
Tease photo

This year's Columbus Day falls on Day 14 of the federal government shutdown, which means both the House and Senate will be in session on the holiday. Over the weekend, senators from both parties assumed key roles in the negotiations, after House Republicans and the White House failed to reach an agreement.

How Columbus Sailed Into U.S. History, Thanks To Italians

Oct. 14
Lakshmi Gandhi / NPR
Tease photo

It's been 521 years since the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus "sailed the ocean blue/in fourteen hundred and ninety-two." Since then, there have been thousands of parades, speeches and statues commemorating Columbus, along with a critical rethinking of his life and legacy.

Cabrillo National Monument's 100th Birthday Party Shut Down

Oct. 14
By Susan Murphy
Tease photo

A ceremony to mark the 100th birthday of the Cabrillo National Monument was set to take place Monday night, but instead it has been postponed due to the partial shutdown of the federal government.

Second Opinion: Can Domestic Partners Apply For Obamacare Coverage Together?

Oct. 14
By Megan Burks
Tease photo

A mechanical engineer's out-of-state employer doesn't cover domestic partners. Can the couple get coverage through California's health insurance exchange?

Future Of Barrio Logan Community Plan Still Uncertain

Oct. 14
By Sandhya Dirks
Tease photo

A plan to rezone the neighborhood of Barrio Logan is set to officially clear city council, but a referendum from the maritime industry leaves the plan's future in doubt.

Americans Win Economics Nobel For Interpreting Stock Prices

Oct. 14
Bill Chappell / NPR
Tease photo

Three American professors have won the 2013 Nobel Prize for Economics for their work in identifying long-term trends in the prices of stocks and bonds, based in part on analyzing the role of risk.

Shutdown Hinders S.D. Ranchers Post-Blizzard Cleanup

Oct. 14
Charles Michael Ray / NPR

A freak October blizzard earlier this month killed tens of thousands of cattle in South Dakota.

How The Debt Limit Became 'A Nuclear-Tipped Leverage Point'

Oct. 14
David Welna / NPR
Tease photo

Political battles over the debt limit have been around nearly as long as the law passed by Congress in 1917 that set a statutory limit for how much debt the Treasury could accrue.

Holding Onto The Other Half Of 'Mixed-Race'

Oct. 14
NPR Staff / NPR
Tease photo

NPRcontinues a series of conversations aboutThe Race Card Project,where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity forMorning Edition.

Exercise May Help Knees More Than Glucosamine And Chondroitin

Oct. 14
Patti Neighmond / NPR

If you're among the estimated 27 million Americans who suffer from osteoarthritis of the knee or hip, then perhaps you've tried the nutritional supplements glucosamine and chondroitin. They've been marketed for joint health for about 20 years, and sales are still brisk. But do they help?

So What's The Real Deadline For Obamacare Sign-Up?

Oct. 14
Julie Rovner / NPR
Tease photo

The health exchanges are now open, though some have a lot of glitches. You still have lots of questions about how the Affordable Care Act affects you and your family.