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Stories for October 18, 2013

Second Arrest Made In Connection With LAX Dry Ice Explosions

Oct. 18
Dana Farrington / NPR
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The dry ice explosions at Los Angeles International Airport have led to a second arrest, police say.

County Health Reports Increase Of Whooping Cough Cases In San Diego

Oct. 18
By City News Service
3 Comments

According to the county's Health and Human Services Agency, 127 cases of whooping cough were reported at this time last year compared to 202 cases so far in 2013.

Tom Foley, A House Speaker Who Embraced Compromise And Comity

Oct. 18
Ron Elving / NPR
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Former Speaker of the House Tom Foley was the product of far different times, yet his career in politics a generation ago still carries a message current congressional leaders might want to heed.

Free Drug Screening Offered For San Diego County Teens

Oct. 18
By Dwane Brown
2 Comments
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The San Diego County Health and Human Services has partnered with local rehab facilities to combat teen drug-use.

US: Racial Policy In Calif. Prison Riots Breaks Law

Oct. 18
Associated Press
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California is violating the federal Constitution when it punishes prison inmates after a riot based on their race, the U.S. Department of Justice said Friday.

MARTHA BAKES: Pâte Sucrée

Oct. 18
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MARTHA BAKES: Pâte Sucrée Tease photo

What most people know as simply “tart dough” is called pâte sucrée, or “sweet pastry,” in professional kitchens. Martha demonstrates how easy it is to create elegant desserts based on this classic crust. Learn how to make a traditional lemon mousse damask tart with candied lemon peel, and a contemporary chocolate tart shell layered with homemade caramel and chocolate ganache and finished with a sprinkling of sea salt.

Money For Dam Project In Shutdown Deal Riles Conservatives

Oct. 18
Peter Overby / NPR
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This week's congressional compromise to end the government shutdown and raise the debt ceiling had a few other provisions as well.

Conservative Group Backs Challenge To 'Liberal' McConnell

Oct. 18
Adam Wollner / NPR
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Days after Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell helped negotiate a deal to end the government shutdown and raise the debt ceiling, a prominent conservative group endorsed his primary challenger.

Serpent Experts Try To Demystify Pentecostal Snake Handling

Oct. 18
John Burnett / NPR
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Two weeks ago, NPR reported on a group of Pentecostals in Appalachia who handle snakes in church to prove their faith in God. The story got us thinking: Why are the handlers bitten so rarely, and why are so few of those snakebites lethal?

Review: 'Carrie'

Oct. 18
By Beth Accomando
7 Comments
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The remakes keep rolling in. This month we get a new version of Brian DePalma’s “Carrie” (opened October 18 throughout San Diego).

Ex-Army And Navy Academy Administrator Arrested On Molestation Charges (Video)

Oct. 18
By Beth Ford Roth
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Jeffrey Barton, who served as an administrator, teacher, and mentor at the Army and Navy Academy in Carlsbad for almost 18 years, was arrested Thursday on suspicion of molesting at least six of the school's students.

Roundtable: Shutdown Is Shut Down; Filner Makes A Plea; Mayoral Candidates Talk It Up

Oct. 18
By Pat Finn, Mark Sauer
3 Comments
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What's next now that the government shutdown has been shut down? What's in Bob Filner's plea agreement with the California Attorney General? The top candidates for mayor are debating pretty much non-stop — so what are they saying?

India Arrests Crew Of U.S. Ship For Carrying Weapons

Oct. 18
Scott Neuman / NPR
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The crew of a U.S.-owned ship has been arrested at a port in India for allegedly trying to enter territorial waters illegally carrying what's been described as a "huge cache" of weapons.

California Firefighter Not Charged In Death After Crash

Oct. 18
Associated Press
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A firefighter who ran over and killed a survivor of the Asiana Airlines crash at San Francisco International Airport will not be charged with a crime, prosecutors said Friday.

Shutdown Delays California Unemployment Data

Oct. 18
Associated Press
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California's monthly unemployment figures for September are being delayed due to the partial federal government shutdown that ended this week.

Sen. Thad Cochran Gets A Tea Party Challenge

Oct. 18
Brakkton Booker / NPR
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It's official: Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran is the latest GOP incumbent to get a primary challenge from the right.

Painkiller Overdose Deaths Strike New York City's Middle Class

Oct. 18
Nancy Shute / NPR
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Drug overdoses are usually thought to afflict mainly the poor and troubled. But it looks like OxyContin and other opioid painkillers are changing the picture.

Armored Knights Face Off In Poway At Tournament Of The Phoenix

Oct. 18
Evening Edition
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Dust off your armor and pick your finest steed because beginning Friday, the Tournament of the Phoenix kicks off three days of jousting, equestrian display and pollaxe combat at the Poway Rodeo.

Preview: Love Gone Wrong Marathon

Oct. 18
By Beth Accomando
2 Comments
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This Saturday starting at 11:45 a.m. at the Birch North Park Theater, FilmOut holds its latest quarterly film marathon. This time it's all about "Love Gone Wrong."

Friday Morning Political Mix

Oct. 18
Liz Halloran / NPR
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As post-shutdown Washington struggles to squeeze itself into its ill-fitting "new normal" suit, this amazing, dispiriting, baffling week finally comes to a close with some same-old, same-old.

San Diego Symphony Steps Onto Bigger Stages

Oct. 18
By Angela Carone
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The San Diego Symphony heads to Carnegie Hall and an overseas tour for the first time. Both trips are important milestones in the orchestra's growth.

2nd SF Bay Area Transit Strike In 4 Months Begins

Oct. 18
Associated Press
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Commuters in the San Francisco Bay Area appear to be getting an earlier start than usual with the region's major commuter train line shut down because of a worker strike.

Can GOP, Democrats Come Together On A Budget By Dec. 13?

Oct. 18
Scott Neuman / NPR
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Now that the government has reopened, attention turns to the next phase of the spending fight, a battle that is far from over.

Greenspan: 'I Probably Could Have Caught' Economic Crises

Oct. 18
NPR Staff / NPR
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Alan Greenspan was celebrated as a master of monetary policy during his long chairmanship of the Federal Reserve, from 1987 to 2006. But policies put in place during Greenspan's tenure have been blamed by some for the financial crisis that began shortly after he left, and the so-called Great Recession.

San Francisco BART Transit Workers Strike

Oct. 18
Scott Neuman / NPR
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It's going to be a frustrating Friday commute in San Francisco after the workers for the region's largest transit system, known as the BART, went out on strike.

In Flooded Colorado, Immigrants' Livelihoods Washed Away

Oct. 18
Kirk Siegler / NPR
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In flood-ravaged Colorado, much of the recovery has focused on rebuilding roads and bridges to mountain towns cut off by last month's floods. But take a drive east to the state's rolling plains, and a whole new set of staggering problems unfolds in farm country.

Declining Gas Prices Pump Up A Shaky Economy

Oct. 18
Marilyn Geewax / NPR
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In recent weeks, economists have been worrying about the negative impact of the now-ended government shutdown and potential debt crisis.

The Whitest Historically Black College In America

Oct. 18
Shereen Marisol Meraji, Gene Demby
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It opened in the late 19th century as the Bluefield Colored Institute, created to educate the children of black coal miners in segregated West Virginia. Although it still receives the federal funding that comes with its designation as a historically black institution, today Bluefield State College is 90 percent white. The road that separates those realities is as rocky as any story of racial transition in post-World War II America.