skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

Stories for October 21, 2013

Nathan Fletcher Gains Mayoral Endorsement From Gov. Jerry Brown

Oct. 21
City News Service

Gov. Jerry Brown endorsed ex-Assemblyman Nathan Fletcher for San Diego mayor.

California High-Speed Rail Begins Search For Artifacts

Oct. 21
Associated Press

An archaeological report prepared by the High-Speed Rail Authority indicates crews could find decades-old artifacts on several properties in Fresno.

FRONTLINE: Hunting The Nightmare Bacteria

Oct. 21
FRONTLINE: Hunting The Nightmare Bacteria Tease photo

“Nightmare bacteria.” That’s how the CDC describes a frightening new threat spreading quickly in hospitals, communities and across the globe. FRONTLINE reporter David Hoffman investigates the alarming rise of untreatable infections: from a young girl thrust onto life support in an Arizona hospital, to a young American infected in India who comes home to Seattle, and an uncontrollable outbreak at the nation’s most prestigious hospital, where 18 patients were mysteriously infected and six died, despite frantic efforts to contain the killer bacteria.

It's Back To The Future For E-Cigarette Ads, At Least For Now

Oct. 21
April Fehling / NPR

E-cigarettes are a booming business among smokers who want to light up indoors, smokers who want to quit and, as the CDC reported last month, among children.

Held Hostage

Oct. 21
Tease photo

On January 16, 2013, al-Qaeda terrorists took control of a giant gas facility in Algeria in a siege that lasted four days and led to the deaths of 37 expatriate workers. This program tells in forensic detail and, for the first time, the story of the siege and investigates the circumstances of the attack: who were the people behind it, why did they attack and how were they able to pull it off? The film also examines the controversial Algerian response that contributed to the 37 fatalities, exploring the human tragedies and consequences of the attack.

Cold Crime: Jell-O Stolen From Work Fridge Sparks Police Call

Oct. 21
Bill Chappell / NPR

The limits of workplace theft are being tested in Pennsylvania, where a man called police this month to complain that his Jell-O had been stolen. The flavor was strawberry, he said. And it wasn't the first instance of fridge-theft.

How Long Do They Really Have To Fix That Obamacare Website?

Oct. 21
Julie Appleby / NPR

But if federal officials can't get the new online insurance marketplace running smoothly by mid-November, the problems plaguing the three-week-old website could become a far bigger threat to the success of the health law, hampering enrollment and fueling opponents' calls to delay implementation, analysts say.

Company Helps Veterans Translate Military Experience Into Civilian Jobs

Oct. 21
By Dwane Brown

Direct Employers, an association of nearly 700 companies, is working to improve the job hunt for military veterans.

Government Shutdown Delays Rocket Launch

Oct. 21
Scott Neuman / NPR
Tease photo

The launch of a rocket carrying a record-breaking 29 satellites -- originally set for early next month -- will be delayed by a few weeks after the partial government shutdown halted preparations.

Volkswagen Union Opposed By Tennessee Republican Officials

Oct. 21
Blake Farmer / NPR
Tease photo

When it comes to union organizing at an auto plant, the tension is typically between the workers and the management. But not at Volkswagen in Tennessee. There, the United Auto Workers is attempting to finally unionize the automaker's first foreign-owned plant in the South. And so far, Republican officials are the ones trying to stand in the way.

At A Younger Age, Mormon Women Are Eager To Share Their Faith

Oct. 21
Stina Sieg / NPR
Tease photo

Tara Carpenter points to a wall map to show where she'll soon spend 18 months proselytizing.

San Diego Woman Steadied By Obama After Almost Fainting

Oct. 21
By Claire Trageser
Tease photo

A San Diego woman made national news Monday when she was steadied by President Barack Obama after nearly fainting during his press conference on the Affordable Care Act.

California Prison Crowding Deadline Extended 1 Month

Oct. 21
Associated Press
Tease photo

Federal judges are giving California an additional month to reduce its prison population, as negotiations continue over a longer-term delay.

Marine Killed In Afghanistan Posted Video Of Singing Before Deployment (Video)

Oct. 21
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Christopher O. Grant, 20, died October 20 while conducting combat operations in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Grant was based at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina.

The Healthcare.gov 'Tech Surge' Is Racing Against The Clock

Oct. 21
Elise Hu / NPR
Tease photo

A "tech surge" is underway to help clean up the code of the error-plagued healthcare.gov site. The Obama administration says this surge is made up of engineers from inside and outside government, but beyond saying that Presidential Innovation Fellows are involved, officials haven't specified who's making up those teams and what exactly they're doing to fix the systemic issues with the site.

Fugitive Arrest: Former Banking Executive Caught In Italy

Oct. 21
Bill Chappell / NPR
Tease photo

A former UBS bank executive who has been a fugitive since being indicted on federal charges in 2008 has been arrested in Italy. Swiss citizen Raoul Weil, the former head of UBS Global Wealth Management International, is accused of defrauding the U.S. government by helping clients evade taxes.

The African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross

Oct. 21
By Jennifer Robinson
The African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross Tease photo

This six-hour series chronicles the full sweep of African-American history, from the origins of slavery on the African continent through more than four centuries of remarkable historic events up to the present. Presented and written by Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr., the series draws on some of America’s top historians and heretofore untapped primary sources, guiding viewers on an engaging journey across two continents to shed new light on the experience of being African American. Among those interviewed are Kathleen Cleaver, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Congressman John Lewis, civil rights activist Diane Nash and more.

In Kansas, Farmers Commit To Take Less Water From The Ground

Oct. 21
Dan Charles / NPR
Tease photo

If you've flown across Nebraska, Kansas or western Texas on a clear day, you've seen them: geometrically arranged circles of green and brown on the landscape, typically half a mile in diameter. They're the result of pivot irrigation, in which long pipes-on-wheels rotate slowly around a central point, spreading water across corn fields.

'Craze' - Dietary Supplement With Meth-Like Compound - Pulled From Military Exchange Shelves

Oct. 21
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

Military bases have pulled Craze from their shelves, prompted by a new study that found that the dietary supplement contains a methamphetamine-like compound.

Sandwich Monday: The Two Bagger

Oct. 21
Ian Chillag / NPR
Tease photo

A food named for its size sets a certain expectation. When you order a McDonald's Quarter Pounder, or Taco Bell's Acre of Beans, you expect volume and satisfaction.

Cleaning Up San Diego's C Street Corridor

Oct. 21
Midday Edition
Tease photo

Downtown San Diego planners are prioritizing C Street as an area that needs revamping downtown. It's part of a 20-year plan called Imagine San Diego.

Retrial Set In Killing Of Escondido Child, Stephanie Crowe

Oct. 21
Midday Edition
Tease photo

The retrial of Richard Tuite is just the latest episode in the legal drama surrounding the death of 12-year old Stephanie Crowe. And despite a finding of factual innocence, Stephanie's brother is likely to once again be implicated by the defense.

California's State Wildlife Action Plan To Be Updated

Oct. 21
Amy Quinton / Capital Public Radio

The California Department and Fish and Wildlife is holding meetings to get input on its State Wildlife Action Plan. It’s the first update in 10 years and could have far-reaching implications for fish, wildlife, conservation and agriculture.

A Look Inside California's Security Housing Units

Oct. 21
Katie Orr / Capital Public Radio
Tease photo

Imagine spending 22 hours a day locked in a small, concrete room. That’s daily life for about 4,000 California prisons inmates.

New Chapter Begins in California Prisons Legal Saga

Oct. 21
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio
Tease photo

Monday is the end of the negotiation period between the two sides in the legal challenge to California’s prison system.

Will San Diego Be The New Home Of The Navy's Largest Destroyer?

Oct. 21
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

The future USS Zumwalt - the Navy's largest destroyer ever - is expected to hit the water for the first time in Maine this week. The homeport of the Zumwalt hasn't been announced, but an internal Navy document hints it will be San Diego.

Smoke In East County From Controlled Burn

Oct. 21
City News Service

Smoke from a controlled burn in the Jamul area will be visible over the East County today.

At Least 2 Dead, 2 Wounded In Nevada School Shooting

Oct. 21
Scott Neuman / NPR
Tease photo

Two people are dead and two others are in critical condition after a shooting Monday morning at a middle school in Nevada.

Obama: Health Care Site Is Troubled; Affordable Care Act Is Not

Oct. 21
Bill Chappell / NPR
Tease photo

The website that's meant to allow Americans to shop and sign up for new medical plans under the Affordable Care Act isn't working as well as it should, President Obama says. But he promised that the problems will be fixed -- and he said the Affordable Care Act is bringing many benefits that aren't tied to those problems.

The Mist And Mystique Of Dry Ice

Oct. 21
Rae Ellen Bichell / NPR
Tease photo

Several prank bombs caused paranoia at Los Angeles International Airport last week. One -- packed in a 20-ounce soda bottle -- exploded in a restroom, one on the tarmac and a third was found just fizzling.

Supreme Court Will Hear Case On Executions And Mental Disability

Oct. 21
Bill Chappell / NPR

The standard by which a person is judged to be mentally competent enough to face execution for a crime will be reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court, which agreed Monday to hear a Florida case revolving around that issue.

Ranchers Wonder If U.S. Sheep Industry Has Bottomed Out

Oct. 21
Luke Runyon / NPR
Tease photo

Over the last 20 years, the number of sheep in the U.S. has plummeted by half. The sheep industry has actually been declining since the late 1940s, when it hit its peak.

Sierra Club Hosts Environmental Mayoral Debate

Oct. 21
City News Service

Three of the leading mayoral candidates will answer environmentally focused questions Monday night during a forum hosted by the Sierra Club.

Timeline For The San Diego Mayoral Race

Oct. 21
City News Service
Tease photo

Monday, Oct. 21 is the first day early voting will be available for the Nov. 19 mayoral election. Here's a timeline of other important dates.

Which Artist Has The Most Work On View In New San Diego Library?

Oct. 21
Dave Hampton
Tease photo

There is a lot of art on display in the new central library. But one artist has more works on view than any other.

‘Not The Loudest Guy In The Room’

Oct. 21
By Claire Trageser
Tease photo

Kevin Faulconer is often described by the three-C adage, "calm, cool and collected," but a thorough look at his background shows more.

Second Opinion: What If I Get Sick Before My Obamacare Coverage Starts?

Oct. 21
By Megan Burks
Tease photo

Nearly 100,000 Californians have started applications on the state's new insurance exchange, Covered California. But completing the process won't mean they can start scheduling check-ups. What happens between October and January?

Monday Morning Political Mix

Oct. 21
Liz Halloran / NPR

Happy Tech-Surge-To-Fix-Healthcare.gov Day in your nation's capital.

Cheney Says He Couldn't Overrule Doctors Who Declared Him Fit

Oct. 21
Mark Memmott / NPR
Tease photo

Among the newsworthy moments in Dr. Sanjay Gupta's interview of former Vice President Dick Cheney on Sunday's 60 Minutes is a discussion about how Cheney came to be the 2000 Republican vice presidential nominee even though he had already suffered three heart attacks by that time.

Should Disabling Premenstrual Symptoms Be A Mental Disorder?

Oct. 21
Amy Standen / NPR
Tease photo

The way Ronna Simmons of Philadelphia describes it, every two weeks a timer goes off.

Enrollments For The Health Care Exchanges Trickle In, Slowly

Oct. 21
Yuki Noguchi / NPR
Tease photo

The Obama administration's hopes ran high that millions would flock to enroll for health insurance on state and federal exchanges established under the Affordable Care Act.