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Stories for October 22, 2013

Mexico Forges Ahead With New Migration Policy

Oct. 22
By Jill Replogle
Tease photo

The Mexican government is working on a new migration policy, and vowing to make problems associated with migration a national priority.

Scripps Gets A Big Grant To Study DNA, Digital Devices And Healthcare

Oct. 22
By David Wagner
Scripps Gets A Big Grant To Study DNA, Digital Devices And Healthcare Tease photo

The Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla will use the funds to continue studying how advancements in genetics, coupled with wireless technology, could make healthcare more personalized, affordable and effective.

Jury Selection For Richard Tuite Retrial Begins

Oct. 22
By City News Service

Jury selection got under way Tuesday for the retrial of a schizophrenic drifter whose conviction in the 1998 killing of a 12-year-old Escondido girl was reversed by a federal appeals court.

Smuggler Who Forced Women Into Prostitution Sentenced To 21 Years

Oct. 22
By City News Service

Adrian Zitlalpopoca-Hernandez, 35, was convicted in January 2010 of several charges, including harboring aliens for prostitution.

For Democrats, Obamacare Web Woes Create 2014 Headache

Oct. 22
Frank James / NPR

President Obama radiated confidence when he took to the Rose Garden earlier this week to convince Americans that the flaws in the Affordable Care Act website would be fixed.

Fifteen Years Of Wrangling Over Yellowstone Snowmobiles Ends

Oct. 22
Elizabeth Shogren / NPR

The federal government today announced new rules for snowmobiles in Yellowstone that will make the country's oldest national park cleaner and quieter.

A Raisin In The Sun Revisited: The Raisin Cycle At CenterStage

Oct. 22
A Raisin In The Sun Revisited: The Raisin Cycle At CenterStage  Tease photo

Center Stage mounts "Clybourne Park" and "Beneatha’s Place" as "The Raisin Cycle" and as part of its 50th anniversary season.

Despite Efforts, Rio Grande River Is One Dirty Border

Oct. 22
Neena Satija / NPR
Tease photo

There's one easy way to find out how bad the water quality is in the Rio Grande river: get into a kayak.

In Cost-Cutting Move, NOAA To Stop Printing Nautical Charts

Oct. 22
Scott Neuman / NPR
Tease photo

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the federal agency charged with surveying the nation's navigable waters to help keep mariners off the rocks and out of the shallows, will cease printing paper charts after mid-April.

Doctors Enlist Therapists To Deliver Better, Cheaper Care

Oct. 22
Kristian Foden-Vencil / NPR
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The state of Oregon is trying some experiments to bring different kinds of medical professionals under the same roof. Patients can see different kind of doctors in one visit, and the hope is it will provide better patient care, eventually at less cost to the state.

San Diego-Based USS Rentz Rescues Fishing Boat Lost At Sea

Oct. 22
By Beth Ford Roth
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The San Diego-based USS Rentz rescued the crew of a fishing vessel that had been stranded off the coast of Ecuador for 10 days. The men aboard the boat were nearly out of food and surviving on bananas when the Rentz found them.

Goldsmith Proposes San Diego City Charter Overhaul

Oct. 22
City News Service
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City Attorney Jan Goldsmith proposed Tuesday a comprehensive overhaul of San Diego's City Charter, which serves as the constitution for municipal government.

Want Your Daughter To Be A Science Whiz? Soccer Might Help

Oct. 22
Nancy Shute / NPR
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Girls who were more physically active at age 11 did better at school as teenagers, a study finds. And the most active girls really aced science.

Job Growth Was Disappointing, But Some See Reasons for Hope

Oct. 22
Marilyn Geewax / NPR
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When it finally came out Tuesday, the September jobs report -- delayed for 18 days by the government shutdown -- showed a labor market moving forward. But the pace was slow enough to prompt many economists to view it as a letdown.

Truly CA: A Lovely Day

Oct. 22
Truly CA: A Lovely Day  Tease photo

Oakland-based organization, Beats Rhymes and Life has teamed up with Bay Area filmmaker, Kerri Gawryn to produce, "A Lovely Day"--a moving film that speaks to the harsh realities and perseverance demonstrated in a group of Oakland teens on their journey to self-discovery and empowerment. The film depicts how Beats Rhymes and Life uses hip hop as a tool for healing and youth development in a city afflicted by violence and poverty.

Midday Movies: Horror So Bad, It's Good

Oct. 22
Midday Edition
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This Thursday, the 4th Annual Horrible Imaginings Film Festival kicks off. Festival director Miguel Rodriguez has designated Friday as "camp night" with a revival screening of "The Killer Shrews" and its brand new sequel, which raise the question: "What makes a bad film good?"

Gov. Brown Signs Bill To Help Foster Parents Adopt

Oct. 22
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed a bill into law that could reduce some of the barriers foster parents face when adopting.

One Doctor's Mission To Bring 'Slow Medicine' Approach To Caring For Aging Parents

Oct. 22
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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The end of life for an elderly relative can be a crisis time for a family, but according to a new approach in geriatric medicine, it doesn't have to be. "Slow medicine" is built around the idea of providing the right kind of care at the right time to older people.

CROSSING SOUTH: San Pedro Mártir

Oct. 22
CROSSING SOUTH: San Pedro Mártir Tease photo

Get ready to explore the national observatory of Mexico on the mountains of Baja. Jorge talks with a Mexican scientist doing research on galaxies. We also observe the deer and coyote wildlife as well as take a hike through the redwood forests surrounding the telescopes. Coming back, we visit the Meling Ranch where Jorge learns about the history of the area and attempts to hunt soda cans.

Blue Angels To Return To The Skies For Full 2014 Schedule (Video)

Oct. 22
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

The team's first stop will be the air show at Naval Air Facility El Centro next March. The Blue Angels are also slated to perform in the 2014 Miramar Air Show.

Former House Aide Lorraine Miller New Interim NAACP Chief

Oct. 22
Scott Neuman / NPR
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The NAACP has selected Lorraine Miller, a former clerk at the House of Representatives, to the post of interim president and CEO to replace Benjamin Jealous.

Raw To Ready: Bentley

Oct. 22
Raw To Ready: Bentley Tease photo

It's a century-old obsession to find the right raw materials to build a car that is fit for both king and race car driver - perfectly luxurious and perfectly fast. The Bentley Motor Company has built common raw ingredients into their signature Mulsanne, an engineering achievement made possible by aluminum, leather, iron, wood and pigment.

Meatless Monday Movement Gets More Veggies On The Menu

Oct. 22
Eliza Barclay / NPR
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America's relationship with meat is an indulgent one. At 270 pounds of meat per person per year, Americans consume more than almost anyone else in the world. (Mostly, we have our livestock producers' successes to thank for making meat cheap and abundant for us.)

California Foreclosure Activity Nears 7-Year Low

Oct. 22
Associated Press

A research firm says California home foreclosure activity neared a seven-year low during the third quarter as rising prices left fewer homeowners in trouble.

New 'Condor Cam' Captures Rare Giant Bird In Wild

Oct. 22
Associated Press

A solar-powered "condor cam" in the hills of Big Sur, on the Central California coast, allows the public to view North America's largest birds from the comfort of home.

OC Wave Riders Discuss Surf Access Rules

Oct. 22
Associated Press

Surfers, bodyboarders, skimboarders and bodysurfers lined up for a chance to weigh in on the controversial rule that dictates when they can and can't ride Orange County's waves.

End Of California Legislative Session Has Business And Labor Leaders Taking Stock

Oct. 22
Max Pringle / Capital Public Radio

California business and labor leaders are taking stock of how they fared during the recently-concluded legislative session.

Hero Teacher Killed In Nevada School Shooting Was Marine Veteran (Video)

Oct. 22
By Beth Ford Roth
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Michael Landsberry, the Sparks Middle School math teacher shot to death Monday by a student, was a Marine veteran. He also served in Afghanistan as a member of the Nevada Air National Guard.

NOVA: Making Stuff: Wilder

Oct. 22
NOVA: Making Stuff: Wilder  Tease photo

What happens when engineers open up nature’s toolbox? David Pogue explores bold innovations inspired by the Earth’s greatest inventor, life itself. From underwater wi-fi based on dolphin communication, to robotic “mules” and “cheetahs” for the military, to swarms of robotic bees, Pogue travels the world seeing the “wildest” ideas put into action in new inventions and technologies. It is a journey that sees today’s bacteria turned into tomorrow’s metallurgists, viruses building batteries, and even DNA, the Code of Life, put to work in “living” computers.

NCAA Won't Ban Miami Hurricanes From Bowls Over Booster's Gifts

Oct. 22
Bill Chappell / NPR
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The University of Miami "lacked institutional control" and didn't notice multiple violations by a booster who for years gave cash and gifts to athletes, the NCAA said. But the organization says the school's football team can play in the postseason, stopping short of the harshest punishment available.

Teacher Who Died Trying To End Shooting Remembered As A Hero

Oct. 22
Scott Neuman / NPR
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Michael Landsberry, the 45-year-old middle school math teacher and Afghan War veteran who was killed Monday trying to talk down a student shooter at a Nevada middle school, is being remembered as a hero.

California Gets More Time To Address Prison Overcrowding

Oct. 22
Katie Orr / Capital Public Radio
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California is getting a little more time to address prison overcrowding.

San Diego Schools Slow To Improve Planning For Special Education Students' Futures

Oct. 22
By Kyla Calvert

For years, San Diego Unified has been out of compliance with federal requirements for students in special education.

Second-Hand Bikes Give Lifeline To San Diego Refugees

Oct. 22
By Susan Murphy
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Second-hand bikes are providing a lifeline to refugees settling in San Diego by giving them a low-cost way to get to work and school.

Trains Running Again In San Francisco As BART Strike Ends

Oct. 22
Mark Memmott / NPR
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Commuters in the San Francisco area should see things start returning to normal Tuesday, thanks to an overnight agreement that has ended a strike by workers at the transit system known as BART.

West Point Women: A Natural Pattern Or A Camouflage Ceiling?

Oct. 22
Larry Abramson / NPR
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At the 200-year-old U.S. Military Academy at West Point, tradition dictates everything. That includes the habit of having freshmen stand in the yard everyday and call cadets to lunch. It's also tradition that the overwhelming majority of the graduating class will be white, and 84 percent male.

Getting Federal Benefits To Gay Couples: It's Complicated

Oct. 22
Carrie Johnson / NPR
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It has been four months since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a law that defined marriage as between a man and a woman. The ruling paved the way for thousands of same-sex married couples to receive federal benefits, and a special group of government lawyers has been working to make that happen.

How Politics Set The Stage For The Obamacare Website Meltdown

Oct. 22
Julie Rovner / NPR
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Since the Affordable Care Act's health care exchanges launched to a long series of error messages Oct. 1, most of the "what went wrong" fingers have been pointing at software developers.

Charity Watchdog Shakes Up Ratings To Focus On Results

Oct. 22
Elizabeth Blair / NPR
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There's one area of the economy that's growing faster than business or government.