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Stories for October 24, 2013

The Case Of The San Diego PhD Asked To Work For Free

Oct. 24
By David Wagner
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A San Diego researcher recently discovered a surefire way to elicit heated reactions from Ph. D.s: Just ask them to work for free.

A Diagram Of HealthCare.gov, Based On The People Who Built It

Oct. 24
Elise Hu / NPR
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One of the major issues that's emerged since the failed rollout of HealthCare.gov is that there was no lead contractor on the project. (CGI Federal was the biggest contractor -- awarded the most expensive contract -- but says it did not have oversight over the other parts of the system.) Instead, the quarterbacking was left to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, a subagency of the Department of Health and Human Services.

Secrets Of The Tower Of London

Oct. 24
Secrets Of The Tower Of London Tease photo

Standing guard over the city of London for nearly 1,000 years, the formidable Tower of London has been a royal castle, a prison, a place of execution and torture, an armory and the Royal Mint. This program unlocks the doors to secret rooms, talks to the people who do the jobs no one sees and reveals some surprising facts about one of England’s most famous icons.

Cardinals Even World Series With Game 2 Win Over Red Sox

Oct. 24
Greg Henderson / NPR
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The St. Louis Cardinals evened the World Series at one game each Thursday night, using a three-run seventh inning to defeat the Boston Red Sox, 4-2.

MARTHA BAKES: Yeast Dough

Oct. 24
MARTHA BAKES: Yeast Dough Tease photo

Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, you’ll welcome Martha’s expert tips and tricks for making a tasty and versatile yeast dough. Martha’s recipe incorporates both butter and sour cream; in this episode, she uses it to make a variety of breakfast treats, from pecan sticky buns to pull-apart monkey bread that’s as much fun to make as it is to eat.

Suspect In Custody After Officer-Involved Shooting Temporarily Shutdown Freeways

Oct. 24
By City News Service

The gunfire erupted about 3:30 p.m. in a culvert off the 2800 block of 39th Street, near Azalea Park. The CHP temporarily closed Route 15 and Interstate 805, causing traffic to backup for miles.

FEMA To Evaluate San Onofre Safety Procedures At Public Hearing

Oct. 24
By Alison St John
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Edison is proposing to move spent nuclear fuel into dry cask storage onsite, but the fuel rods will remain in cooling ponds for a minimum of five years.

Kearny High Showcases Linked Learning

Oct. 24
By Kyla Calvert
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An event at Kearny High kicks off a statewide showcase of programs that connect high school students to career pathways.

San Diego Should Have Enough Water For 2014

Oct. 24
By City News Service
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San Diego County Water Authority credits healthy reservoir storage levels, strong regional water conservation efforts and growing water transfers from the Colorado River.

Council Mulls Closing Children's Pool During Harbor Seal Pupping Season

Oct. 24
By City News Service
Council Mulls Closing Children's Pool During Harbor Seal Pupping Season Tease photo

The beach ban at the popular La Jolla spot would be from between Dec. 15 and May 15, when the seals are birthing and weaning their young.

San Diego Marks Tenth Anniversary Of Cedar Fire On Friday

Oct. 24
By City News Service
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The blaze started on a blistering hot fall day between Ramona and Julian when a lost hunter started a signal fire. Weeks later, 15 people were dead, 273,000 acres were scorched and more than 2,200 homes were destroyed.

FDA Seeks To Tighten Controls On Hydrocodone Painkillers

Oct. 24
Rob Stein / NPR

The Food and Drug Administration Thursday announced that it wants the federal government to impose tough new restrictions on some of the most widely used prescription painkillers.

Teen Drinking Party Busts Maryland Attorney General

Oct. 24
Adam Wollner / NPR
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Doug Gansler is Maryland's top law enforcement official. As the state's attorney general, he's spoken out against the perils of underage drinking.

Feds Recast Child Prostitutes As Victims, Not Criminals

Oct. 24
Jessica Pupovac / NPR
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Across the country, newly formed task forces made up of local, state and federal law enforcement officers are starting to view what was once seen as run-of-the-mill prostitution as possible instances of sex trafficking.

Abuse Allegations Leave Twin Cities Archdiocese In Turmoil

Oct. 24
Madeleine Baran / NPR
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The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis has been rocked in recent weeks by revelations from a top-level whistle-blower. The former official says church leaders covered up numerous cases of sexual misconduct by priests and even made special payments to pedophiles.

Dangerous Fungus Makes A Surprise Appearance In Montana

Oct. 24
Nancy Shute / NPR

What life-threatening illness can you get from repotting plants, attending a rodeo or going spelunking? If you didn't guess histoplasmosis, you're not alone.

Proposed Bond Could Fund $120 Million In San Diego Infrastructure Projects

Oct. 24
City News Service

A proposed bond issue that the City Council will take up in January would fund $120 million worth of projects, including street repairs, storm drain improvements and replacement fire stations in San Diego.

Texas Vs. Utah: A Tale Of Two Government Shutdowners

Oct. 24
S.V. Date / NPR
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Two Tea Party-backed, defund-Obamacare-or-we'll-shut-down-the-government Senate leaders. Two very different outcomes.

El Cajon Mayor Apologizes For Remarks About Chaldean Community

Oct. 24
By Susan Murphy
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The mayor of El Cajon issued an apology Thursday for recent comments he made in The Progessive magazine regarding the Chaldean community.

Review: 'The Curse Of Styria'

Oct. 24
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Last October I highlighted a Kickstarter campaign by two SDSU grads to raise $25,000 for post-production costs on their indie film. Now San Diego audiences will get a sneak peek of “The Curse of Styria” Sunday night at the Horrible Imaginings Film Festival at the Digital Gym Cinema.

California Among States Vowing 3.3M Zero-Emission Vehicles By 2025

Oct. 24
Jason Dearen / Associated Press

The governors of eight states including California and New York pledged Thursday to work together to create charging stations and other fueling infrastructure needed to get 3.3 million zero-emission vehicles on those states' roadways by 2025 to curb greenhouse gas pollution.

Two Guardsmen Shot At Naval Support Activity Midsouth, Suspect In Custody

Oct. 24
By Beth Ford Roth
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A National Guardsman on Thursday shot two fellow Guardsmen just outside of Naval Support Activity Midsouth in Millington, Tennessee. The suspect is in custody, and the two shooting victims have injuries that are not life-threatening.

At An Abandoned Philadelphia Prison, All Hell Breaks Loose

Oct. 24
Laurel Dalrymple / NPR
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It was a bright and sunny autumn afternoon in Philadelphia. But a menacing storm was brewing near downtown in the form of a monstrous, Gothic-style fortress with 30-foot stone walls, iron gates and foreboding towers.

Is Eastern State Penitentiary Really Haunted?

Oct. 24
Laurel Dalrymple / NPR
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With its looming, gloomy high stone walls, crumbling corridors, and stark cells that once housed thousands of hard-core criminals, Eastern State Penitentiary certainly looks haunted. Its 142-year history is full of suicide, madness, disease, murder and torture, making it easy to imagine the spirits of troubled souls left behind to roam its abandoned halls.

Marshal South: An Experiment Of Primitive Life In The San Diego Desert

Oct. 24
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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In 1930, writer Marshal South and his wife moved to a mountaintop for a life of isolation and naturalism, documenting their experiences while raising three children in the desert.

Camp Pendleton Marine Unit Among Last Deployed To Afghanistan

Oct. 24
By Beth Ford Roth
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The I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), based at Camp Pendleton, will be the last major Marine Corps command to deploy to Afghanistan as the war winds down. On Wednesday, I MEF held a special reactivation ceremony on base in preparation for its year-long deployment in early 2014.

Government Shutdown Makes Its Debut In Campaign Ads

Oct. 24
Adam Wollner / NPR
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The federal government shutdown ordeal only recently ended, but candidates on both sides of the aisle are already on the air with ads aiming to turn the impasse to their advantage.

Sweetwater 7th Graders To Begin New Academic Journey

Oct. 24
Midday Edition
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The Compact for Success Program at Sweetwater Union High School District aims to get more students into college.

A View Of Insurance Marketplace Problems From 4 States

Oct. 24
NPR
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As snafus with the federal health insurance website have multiplied, some states are making halting progress getting people signed up for coverage. But the picture isn't pretty.

Report: Meat Producers Ignore Pleas For Health, Environmental Reform

Oct. 24
Eliza Barclay / NPR
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Five years ago, a landmark report excoriated the animal agriculture industry's practices and laid out a road map for how it could do better. But in the years since, the problems are just as bad -- and maybe even worse.

San Diego County Gasoline Price Resumes Dropping

Oct. 24
City News Service

The average price of a gallon of self-serve regular gasoline in San Diego County dropped to its lowest amount since Jan. 29 today, decreasing six-tenths of a cent to $3.775.

Candidate Confidential: A Q&A With The Mayoral Front-Runners

Oct. 24
By Sandhya Dirks
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What's your favorite place in San Diego? Your first job? We asked the top four mayoral candidates some simple and personal questions and got some revealing answers.

Meetings Let Residents Weigh In On Infrastructure Priorities

Oct. 24
By Megan Burks
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San Diego City Councilman Mark Kersey wants your help drafting the city's infrastructure budget.

New Devices Help Patients Monitor Their Chronic Conditions At Home

Oct. 24
By Kenny Goldberg
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Thanks to medical sensors and other new types of electronic devices, some people with chronic illnesses can successfully manage their diseases at home.

At Health Care Hearings, GOP Will Take White House To Task

Oct. 24
Mark Memmott / NPR
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Republicans in the House have framed the central question they want answered about the roll-out of the Affordable Care Act this way, NPR's Ailsa Chang said Thursday on Morning Edition:

Red-State Senators Face Activist Challengers From Within

Oct. 24
Liz Halloran / NPR
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Re-election trouble is brewing for longtime Republican senators in deep-red states, from South Carolina to Wyoming. And the trouble is from within.

Therapists Explore Dropping Solo Practices To Join Groups

Oct. 24
Sarah Varney / NPR

In the corporate world of American health care, psychologists and other mental health therapists are still mostly mom-and-pop shops. They build their own solo practices, not unlike Lucy in the Peanuts comic strip gang who hung her own shingle: "Psychiatric Help, 5 [Cents] -- The Doctor Is In."

How One D.C. Suburb Set A Gold Standard For Commuting

Oct. 24
David Greene / NPR
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It may come as a surprise to riders on Metro's Orange Line in Arlington, Va., just outside Washington, D.C., but the area sets the bar for suburban transit.

Proposed Minimum Sentencing Law In Illinois Faces Scrutiny

Oct. 24
Cheryl Corley / NPR
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In Illinois, you can face a prison term of one to three years if you use a weapon unlawfully. But you might serve only half that time, or you could get probation or even boot camp.