skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

Stories for October 28, 2013

Reverse Commutes Now Often A Daily Slog, Too

Oct. 28
David Schaper / NPR
Tease photo

It is still as dark as night as Jim Rix steps out of his red brick Chicago bungalow and gets into his car, parked on the street. It's 6 a.m., and the 53-year-old engineer is getting an early start on his 35-mile commute out to Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago's southwest suburbs.

Fuel Supply System Fixes Pick Up Gas After Superstorm Sandy

Oct. 28
Jeff Brady / NPR
Tease photo

One of the effects of Superstorm Sandy a year ago could be seen at service stations throughout New York City and surrounding areas: Motorists joined long lines outside the few stations that had both electricity and gasoline.

Council Unanimously OKs Plan To Reorganize San Diego City Operations

Oct. 28
By City News Service

Under Interim Mayor Todd Gloria's plan, three deputy COOs will be hired to oversee neighborhood services, internal operations, and infrastructure and public works.

Pelosi: Let's Spend Our Energy Making Obamacare Work

Oct. 28
Frank James / NPR
Tease photo

Message discipline, thy name is Rep. Nancy Pelosi.

"Linked Learning" Grants To Push Career Tech In California Schools

Oct. 28
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

California lawmakers and superintendents are touting a new program intended to expand career technical education in high schools and community colleges.

New City Policy Would Change Way Infrastructure Money Is Prioritized

Oct. 28
By Megan Burks
Tease photo

San Diego City Council considers a policy to better prioritize parks, libraries and fire stations in underserved neighborhoods.

U.S. Commerce Secretary Looks At 20 Years Of NAFTA

Oct. 28
By Jill Replogle
Tease photo

As the 20th anniversary of the North American Free Trade Agreement approaches, business and government leaders met in San Diego to take stock of the region's progress and future.

Scientists: Asian Carp Breeding In Great Lake Tributaries

Oct. 28
Scott Neuman / NPR
Tease photo

Scientists have confirmed for the first time that at least one variety of Asian carp is living and breeding in the Great Lakes watershed, where it threatens stocks of native fish.

Smokers More Likely To Think About Quitting On Mondays

Oct. 28
By Kenny Goldberg
Tease photo

The decision to quit smoking isn't some random act, according to new research from San Diego State University.

Talking About Numbers, Not Just Counting, Builds Kids' Understanding

Oct. 28
By Kyla Calvert
Tease photo

New research shows talking to young children about numbers might help them understand what the words one, two and three mean, better than counting.

Living Coast Discovery Center Raises Enough Money To Remain Open

Oct. 28
By Dwane Brown
Tease photo

An outpouring of community support will allow The Living Coast Discovery Center in Chula Vista to keep its doors open after a $200,000 deficit.

Movember Puts The Spotlight On 'Staches And Men's Health

Oct. 28
Midday Edition
Tease photo

Mustaches turn November into Mo-vember, and it's all for a good cause.

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: War Of The Worlds

Oct. 28
AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: War Of The Worlds Tease photo

Relive the thrill of Orson Welles’ infamous radio dramatization of H.G. Wells’ "War of the Worlds," 75 years after it set off one of the biggest mass hysteria events in U.S. history. Featuring interviews with film director and cinema historian Peter Bogdanovich, Welles’s daughter Chris Welles Feder, and other authors and experts, as well as dramatizations of some of the thousands of letters sent to Welles by an alternately admiring and furious public, "War Of The Worlds" explores how Welles’s ingenious use of the new medium of radio struck fear into an already anxious nation.

Sen. Feinstein: 'Total Review' Of NSA Activities Needed

Oct. 28
Scott Neuman / NPR
Tease photo

Dianne Feinstein, the Democratic chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, is calling for a "total review" of spying operations directed against foreign leaders.

Science On Shaky Ground As Automatic Budget Cutbacks Drag On

Oct. 28
Geoff Brumfiel / NPR
Tease photo

At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scientists use a powerful computer known as Titan to simulate everything from the inner workings of a nuclear reactor to the complicated effects of climate change on human populations -- on a global scale. Until recently, Titan was the most powerful supercomputer on the planet, but now there's a new No. 1.

More Technical Issues For Obamacare, But Good News For Medicare

Oct. 28
Julie Rovner / NPR

Monday was yet another troubled day for the Affordable Care Act.

Taking Stock Of What Was Lost And Found Post-Sandy

Oct. 28
Tracey Samuelson / NPR
Tease photo

After Superstorm Sandy struck the East Coast, people returned to waterlogged homes and began to assess the damage. They created lost-and-found lists on the walls of town halls or Facebook pages to try to recover some of what the storm had swept away.

Judge Rules Texas Abortion Restrictions Unconstitutional

Oct. 28
Scott Neuman / NPR

New abortion restrictions passed by the Texas Legislature are unconstitutional, a federal judge ruled Monday in a divisive case the state has already vowed to appeal.

What You Need To Know About Babies, Toddlers And Screen Time

Oct. 28
Elise Hu / NPR
Tease photo

This week, we're exploring the tech frontier through the eyes of our children. So we're starting with the littlest ones -- babies. Can certain kinds of screen time help babies learn?

National Guard Keeping Fans Safe At World Series

Oct. 28
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

It doesn't matter if you're rooting for the Cardinals or the Red Sox, if you're watching the World Series at Busch Stadium, the Missouri National Guard is there to keep you safe. (Pun intended.)

Syrian Hackers Hit Social Media Accounts Linked To President

Oct. 28
Scott Neuman / NPR

The Syrian Electronic Army - a shadowy group of hackers acting in support of the Assad regime - has hit Twitter and Facebook accounts linked to President Obama.

Eeek, Snake! Your Brain Has A Special Corner Just For Them

Oct. 28
Jon Hamilton / NPR

Anthropologist Lynne Isbell was running through a glade in central Kenya in 1992 when something suddenly caused her to freeze in her tracks. "I stopped just in front of a cobra," she says. "It was raised with its hood spread out."

San Diego Interim Mayor Todd Gloria With An Update On City Business

Oct. 28
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
Tease photo

San Diego Interim Mayor Todd Gloria gives an update on the business of the city, from the proposed infrastructure bond — to plastic bags.

Putting The Spotlight On Blacks In Tech

Oct. 28
NPR Staff / NPR
Tease photo

Representatives from Historically Black Colleges and Universities are meeting this week to talk about African Americans in the tech world.

Penn State To Pay Nearly $60 Million In Abuse Settlement

Oct. 28
Scott Neuman / NPR
Tease photo

Penn State has reached a $59.7 million settlement with 26 young men who accused former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky of sexual abuse, the university confirmed Monday.

Fall Gardening Tips For San Diego

Oct. 28
Midday Edition
Tease photo

Fall Is the best time to plant in San Diego. Gardening expert Nan Sterman will explain what to plant now in your fall garden.

Craig Venter And Life At The Speed of Light

Oct. 28
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
Tease photo

When computer code meets DNA we stand at the dawn of digital life. Pioneering biologist J. Craig Venter discusses his new book: Life at the Speed of Light: From the Double Helix to the Dawn of Digital Life.

Holiday Mail Delivery Deadlines Announced For Overseas Military

Oct. 28
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

The holiday mailing deadline is fast approaching for folks with loved ones serving overseas. To ensure that parcel post packages make it to your service member before Christmas, you must mail them by November 12.

INDEPENDENT LENS: The Graduates

Oct. 28
INDEPENDENT LENS: The Graduates Tease photo

This two-part special examines the many roots of the Latino dropout crisis through the eyes of six inspiring young students who are part of an ongoing effort to increase graduation rates for a growing Latino population. These student profiles offer a first-hand perspective on the challenges facing many Latino high school students, including over-crowded schools, crime-ridden neighborhoods, teen pregnancy and pressure to contribute to the family finances.

San Francisco jumps into soda regulation debate

Oct. 28
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- San Francisco is getting into the debate over regulating sugary drinks.

If Pumpkin Destruction Offends You, DO NOT WATCH THIS VIDEO

Oct. 28
Mark Memmott / NPR
Tease photo

See if you agree with Gawker that "there's something oddly satisfying about watching this guy kill pumpkins."

So A Former Governor, Speaker And Chief Justice Walk Into A Ballroom...

Oct. 28
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio
Tease photo

Three former leaders of California’s three branches of government disagree about whether the state’s direct democracy process is serving voters well — but they all agree on a potential way to improve it.

Psychiatrist Shortage At State Prison Hospital

Oct. 28
Associated Press

A state prison hospital on California's central coast has closed one of its special admission units and is admitting fewer patients because of a shortage of psychiatrists.

San Diego City Council Explores Management Reorganization In Mayor's Office

Oct. 28
City News Service

The City Council is scheduled today to take up a proposed management reorganization of the San Diego mayor's office.

The Renewed Effort For The State Of Jefferson

Oct. 28
Katie Orr / Capital Public Radio
Tease photo

The people of Northern California’s Siskiyou County are fed up with the state government and they’re reviving their efforts to break out on their own.

California Legislature May Re-Visit Realistic Non-Lethal Gun Issue

Oct. 28
Max Pringle / Capital Public Radio

Gun control advocates in California are raising the issue of real looking air guns and toy guns after the recent shooting death of a Northern California teenager by police who mistook his air rifle for a real one.

911 Dispatchers Take Desperate Calls From Migrants In An Unforgiving Desert

Oct. 28
Tease photo

Emergency workers based in Phoenix routinely hear from border crossers who need to be rescued from the desert on the edge of Maricopa County.

Condola Rashad Stars In Broadway's Biracial 'Romeo & Juliet'

Oct. 28
Tell Me More Staff / NPR
Tease photo

Many people might know Condola Rashad as the daughter of actress Phylicia Rashad, who played Claire Huxtable on The Cosby Show, and NFL sportscaster Ahmad Rashad. The 26-year-old got Tony Award nominations for her performances in Stick Fly and The Trip to Bountiful. Now she takes on her first lead role on Broadway in the new production of Romeo & Juliet. Her Romeo is Orlando Bloom of Lord of the Rings fame.

Troops Using Liposuction To Pass Body Fat Test (Video)

Oct. 28
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

Faced with a body fat test that many experts call unfair, some members of the U.S. military are turning to liposuction to meet the Department of Defense's stringent standards.

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Oct. 28
Alan Greenblatt / NPR
Tease photo

There's a big race right now to become the 51st state.

People Or Seals? San Diego City Council Revisits Children's Pool Controversy

Oct. 28
By Susan Murphy
Tease photo

The San Diego City Council is set to vote Tuesday on an ordinance that would prohibit people from entering Children’s Pool Beach in La Jolla from Dec. 15 through May 15.

Mid-City Student Featured In National PBS Documentary

Oct. 28
Bianca Bruno
Tease photo

"The Graduates" follows six Latino students working to achieve their higher education goals.

Second Opinion: What If My Income Increases After I Sign Up For Obamacare?

Oct. 28
By Megan Burks
Tease photo

A San Diego artist with a variable income wants to know what happens if she gets a health insurance subsidy, only to find out later she made too much to qualify.

Monday Political Mix: Obamacare Site Hits Another Snag

Oct. 28
Frank James / NPR
Tease photo

It's the last week of October. That means the administration has just a month to meet its self-imposed deadline to have the Affordable Care Act website running as efficiently as it and millions of Americans had originally envisioned.

Parts Of Rockies And West To Be Treated To Snow For Halloween

Oct. 28
Mark Memmott / NPR
Tease photo

The forecast doesn't make it sound as severe as the storm that dumped a couple feet of snow on the northern Rockies and some Plains states earlier this month, but the National Weather Service is warning that people in those regions should be ready for a strong winter storm system in coming days.

A Churchill 'Quote' That U.S. Politicians Will Never Surrender

Oct. 28
Scott Horsley / NPR
Tease photo

This week, Congress dedicates a new bust of Winston Churchill in the U.S. Capitol's Statuary Hall. The sculpture is meant to honor the British statesman's legacy of determination and resolve.

Health Screens Offered By Nonprofits May Harm More Than Help

Oct. 28
Jenny Gold / NPR

Messiah United Methodist Church in Springfield, Va., is unusually busy for a Thursday morning. It's not a typical time for worship, but parishioner Stacy Riggs and her husband have come for something a little different: a medical screening.

The Slow, Uneven Rebuilding After Superstorm Sandy

Oct. 28
Joel Rose / NPR
Tease photo

After Hurricane Sandy, the south shore of Staten Island looked like it had been hit by a tsunami. The storm surge devastated whole neighborhoods suddenly, in a matter of hours. In the year since the storm, some families have been rebuilding their homes and their lives. Others are ready to sell their flood-damaged properties and move on.

A Look Into Facebook's Potential To Recognize Anybody's Face

Oct. 28
Martin Kaste / NPR
Tease photo

Revelations about NSA spying have left people wondering about the privacy of their digital data. But what about the privacy of their faces?

The Recipe For Strong Teenage Bones: Exercise, Calcium and D

Oct. 28
Patti Neighmond / NPR
Tease photo

It's really only a sliver of time when humans build the bulk of their skeleton. At age 9, the bones start a big growth spurt. And by the time puberty ends, around 14 or 15 years old, the adult-sized skeleton is all but done, about 90 percent complete.