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Stories for October 31, 2013

Appeals Court Gives Texas OK To Enforce Abortion Law

Oct. 31
Scott Neuman / NPR

A federal appeals court has granted a Texas request to reinstate restrictions on abortion providers after a lower court blocked the state from fully implementing the new law.

Sara Kruzan Released From Prison 18 Years After Killing Pimp As Teen

Oct. 31
By Amita Sharma
Sara Kruzan Released From Prison 18 Years After Killing Pimp As Teen Tease photo

Sara Kruzan left the Central California Women’s Prison in Chowchilla early Thursday morning. Her release was a triumphant moment after a lengthy, uphill legal fight.

Scripps Scientists Offer Unprecedented Look At Key AIDS Protein

Oct. 31
By Kenny Goldberg
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A new finding from the Scripps Research Institute may get researchers one step closer towards the development of an AIDS vaccine.

Legal Battle Over Encinitas Yoga Continues

Oct. 31
By Kyla Calvert
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This summer a Superior Court judge ruled the yoga program is not religious and can continue but an Escondido-based attorney filed an appeal.

Opponents Of Barrio Logan Re-Zoning Plan Submit Petition

Oct. 31
By City News Service

Led by the area's three main shipyards, the group contends rezoning will force their suppliers out of the area, and that would result in higher costs for the suppliers and the shipyards.

Border Patrol Made About 420,000 Arrests Last Year

Oct. 31
Associated Press

It was the second consecutive year that apprehensions went up since the Border Patrol recorded a near 40-year low in arrests in 2011.

Cook's Country From America's Test Kitchen: Homespun Breakfast Treats

Oct. 31
Cook's Country From America's Test Kitchen: Homespun Breakfast Treats Tease photo

Test cook Bridget Lancaster shows host Christopher Kimball how to make Fluffy Cornmeal Pancakes. Then, tasting expert Jack Bishop challenges Chris to a tasting of multigrain bread. Next, Chris shares the top 10 cooking tips from the test kitchen. And finally, test cook Erin McMurrer uncovers the secrets to making English Muffin Bread right at home.

Judge Blocks Oversight For NYPD's 'Stop And Frisk' Policy

Oct. 31
Scott Neuman / NPR
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A federal appeals court judge has put a temporary hold on changes to the New York Police Department's controversial "stop-and-frisk" policy ordered by a lower court and suspended the judge that made the earlier ruling.

Booker Brings Dash Of Diversity To Still Old, White Senate

Oct. 31
Liz Halloran / NPR
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Cory Booker is a Yale-educated lawyer and erstwhile tweeter who, as mayor of Newark, N.J., displayed a knack for grabbing headlines while building a mixed legacy as the troubled city's leader.

A Clash Of Styles As GOP Factions Fight For Alabama District

Oct. 31
Debbie Elliott / NPR
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Voters in Alabama's 1st congressional district are getting a glimpse of the factions vying for control of the Republican Party as two GOP candidates face off in a special election Tuesday.

What's So 'Chinese' About A Chinese Fire Drill?

Oct. 31
Lakshmi Gandhi / NPR

Enter the phrase "Chinese fire drill" into YouTube and you'll find page upon page of videos of a classic car prank that's been popular since the 1960s.

Heat, Drought Draw Farmers Back To Sorghum, The 'Camel Of Crops'

Oct. 31
Dan Charles / NPR

Much of the world is turning hotter and dryer these days, and it's opening new doors for a water-saving cereal that's been called "the camel of crops:" sorghum. In an odd twist, this old-fashioned crop even seems to be catching on among consumers who are looking for "ancient grains" that have been relatively untouched by modern agriculture.

America's First Transcontinental Highway Turns 100

Oct. 31
NPR
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A hundred years ago, a new era of transportation in America was ushered in, when the Lincoln Highway was dedicated. For the first time, Americans could drive on one designated route from coast to coast.

Federal Court To Weigh Ohio's Execution Drug Cocktail

Oct. 31
Karen Kasler (Ohio Public Radio) / NPR

In Ohio on Friday, a hearing in federal court could decide whether that state will become the first to use a particular cocktail of deadly drugs to execute an inmate. It's the latest chapter in what's become a troubled history of capital punishment in that state.

Charities Gear Up For Cut To Food Stamp Benefits

Oct. 31
Scott Neuman / NPR
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More than 47 million Americans who receive food stamps will be getting a bit less starting Friday when a temporary benefit enacted as part of the federal stimulus expires.

Turning The Page On Illiteracy, Adults Go Back To Class

Oct. 31
Kavitha Cardoza / NPR
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The national debate around education usually focuses on children in school. But there are 30 million adults in the U.S. who have trouble with basic literacy -- they struggle to read a menu, a pay stub or a bus schedule.

Economic, Political Volatility Cloud Housing Recovery

Oct. 31
Yuki Noguchi / NPR

Housing has been one of the bright spots in the economy this year. This week, a report showed that home prices in the top 20 cities continued their robust upward march in August. There are also far fewer foreclosure sales and other signs of distress in the market.

Wrongful Death Verdict Reversed In Virginia Tech Case

Oct. 31
Bill Chappell / NPR

A wrongful death verdict related to the 2007 shootings at Virginia Tech has been overturned after the Virginia Supreme Court found that school officials could not have foreseen that 32 people would die in an attack on its campus.

Judge Keeps California Sriracha Factory Open, For Now

Oct. 31
Associated Press
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A judge has denied a Southern California factory town's attempt to shut down production of Sriracha chili sauce.

Capt. James Kirk To Command Navy's New 'Stealth Destroyer'

Oct. 31
Scott Neuman / NPR

Captain James Kirk always got the latest, most advanced ship in Star Fleet, so it seems only fitting that the Navy's new stealth destroyer, the USS Zumwalt, is slated to be commanded by none other than Capt. James Kirk, USN.

Weekend Preview: A Silent Horror Classic And San Diego's Annual Dia De Los Muertos

Oct. 31
Midday Edition
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Our Halloween edition of Weekend Preview features a horror movie from the past along with a resurrected local rock band.

Which City In San Diego County Is The Most Walkable?

Oct. 31
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
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The San Diego Regional Walk Scorecard is out: How does your city stack up? We take a look at the county's most walkable cities and why it matters.

Watch Live Feed Of USS Thach Decommissioning Ceremony On Friday (Video)

Oct. 31
By Beth Ford Roth
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The Navy will decommission the USS Thach at Naval Base San Diego on Friday. Home Post will live stream the decommissioning ceremony.

San Diegans May Soon Be Asked To BYOB (Bring Your Own Bag)

Oct. 31
Midday Edition
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The San Diego City Council will vote in January on an ordinance that would ban single-use plastic bags from some stores, joining 85 other California municipalities. But not everyone is on board.

The Third Retraction Demand From North County Transit District, And Our Response

Oct. 31
By Brad Racino
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For the third time, the North County Transit District has sent inewsource and KPBS a retraction demand in response to a story. For the third time, we have responded.

Family Members Of Pearl Harbor Survivor Fulfill His Final Wish

Oct. 31
By Beth Ford Roth
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Gale Mohlenbrink, a survivor of the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, joined his shipmates this week when his family scattered his ashes near the USS Utah Memorial on Ford Island, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

The Secret, Steamy History Of Halloween Apples

Oct. 31
Alison Richards / NPR
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A Halloween apple bob may seem as homespun as a hayride, but that shiny red apple has a steamy past. It was once a powerful symbol of fertility and immortality.

As Iraq's Leader Meets Obama, Here's Why The Stakes Are High

Oct. 31
Larry Kaplow / NPR
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Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki last came to the U.S. in 2011 as American troops were pulling out of his country. But with violence again on the rise in Iraq, there's much at stake as he prepares to sit down with President Obama at the White House on Friday.

'I Was Very Shocked,' Says Driver Ticketed For Wearing Google Glass

Oct. 31
Bill Chappell / NPR
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The Google Glass is a hands-free device, but that didn't stop a California driver from getting a ticket for wearing the headset during a traffic stop this week. Cecilia Abadie, who's in Google's Explorer program of people testing Glass before its official launch, got a ticket for speeding -- and for wearing a device that could block her view of the road.

Stealing Candy From Your Kids? It's A Halloween Tradition

Oct. 31
Mark Memmott / NPR
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We've rounded up some Halloween-related news. Think of this as our treat bag:

FAA Says Fliers Can Safely Use Most Electronics

Oct. 31
Mark Memmott / NPR
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Saying it has "determined that airlines can safely expand passenger use of Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) during all phases of flight," the Federal Aviation Administration announced Thursday that it is advising airlines they can let fliers use their much-loved e-books, tablets and other handhelds "gate-to-gate."

No More Guns For Neighborhood Watch In Sanford, Fla.

Oct. 31
Mark Memmott / NPR
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The police chief in Sanford, Fla., where neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman shot and killed teenager Trayvon Martin in February 2012, will unveil rules next week that stress "volunteers are not to carry guns and not to follow suspects," our colleagues at Orlando's WMFE report.

Sophisticated Cross-Border Tunnel Discovered In Otay Mesa

Oct. 31
By Susan Murphy and City News Service
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The San Diego Tunnel Task Force discovered a sophisticated cross-border tunnel Wednesday between San Diego and Tijuana.

Jobless Claims Dip For Third Straight Week

Oct. 31
Mark Memmott / NPR

The number of Americans filing first-time claims for unemployment insurance fell by 10,000 last week, to 340,000 from 350,000 the week before, the Employment and Training Administration said Thursday.

The "Other" Candidates Running For San Diego Mayor

Oct. 31
By Sandhya Dirks
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There are more mayoral candidates then those often represented in the news. KPBS takes a look at some of those also joining in the race to be mayor.

UC San Diego Professors Test Waters of Massive, Open Online Learning

Oct. 31
By Kyla Calvert
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Elite universities have been experimenting with massive, open, online courses, or MOOCs, for a couple of years now. UC San Diego is joining them.

Thursday Political Mix: For Obama, Halloween Comes Everyday

Oct. 31
Frank James / NPR
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It was predictable that President Obama would face more political tricks than treats as a re-elected president than he did as a new one if only because, unlike his first term, he started his second with a Republican House largely hostile to him and his agenda.

Big Papi, Worst-To-First, 1918: Your World Series Must-Knows

Oct. 31
Mark Memmott / NPR
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OK, by now you've hopefully heard that the Boston Red Sox are Major League Baseball's champions thanks to a 6-1 win Wednesday over the St. Louis Cardinals.

A New Way To Do Halloween: Chocolate Chunks In The Trunk

Oct. 31
Stephanie Lecci / NPR
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The parking lot of Messiah Evangelical Lutheran Church in Beloit, Wis., is filled with dozens of costumed kids hungry for candy at an early Halloween event.

For A New Kind Of Commute, Some Eye The Sky

Oct. 31
Richard Harris / NPR
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This story is part of a series on commuting in America.

Congressmen Berate Sebelius For Cancellations, Website Woes

Oct. 31
Julie Rovner / NPR

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius headed to Capitol Hill Wednesday for a date with lawmakers frustrated by the rocky rollout of the HealthCare.gov website.

Providence Kindles Love Of Horror Writer H.P. Lovecraft

Oct. 31
Catherine Welch / NPR
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Pulp-fiction writer Howard Phillips "H.P." Lovecraft has for decades terrified an underground following of readers with horror stories about monsters and aliens. He's known to some as a bad writer, and to many as a racist. Even during the author's lifetime, his readership was limited.

When 'Fixed Income' Means Getting By On Social Security

Oct. 31
Ina Jaffe / NPR
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Social Security has long been thought of as just part of a retirement plan -- along with pensions and savings -- but it turns out a lot of people depend on it for most of their income.