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Navy Yard Memorial: President Obama Leads Honors For Victims

Relatives of victims of Monday's Navy Yard shootings in Washington, D.C., are escorted to their seats Sunday. President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama are attending the memorial service, along with other officials.

The Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C., is the scene for a memorial service Sunday, to honor the victims of the Navy Yard shootings. President Obama is at the event to deliver a speech that is expected to mourn the victims and call for preventing such tragic losses in the future.

Before the Sunday afternoon service, the president and first lady Michelle Obama met with families who lost loved ones in Monday's attack. The violence took place less than three blocks away from the Barracks in southeast Washington.

The private memorial is being held on the facility's parade grounds, where some 4,000 people are expected to attend. The memorial is being streamed live on the Pentagon's website.

Early reports from the scene describe a mix of uniformed officers and civilians. Those in attendance included Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey, Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Attorney General Eric Holder.

Earlier Sunday, gun rights activists took to the morning talk shows to speak against making new attempts to curb Americans' rights to own guns.

The head of the National Rifle Association, Wayne LaPierre, said that more personnel at military facilities should be armed to try to stop such attacks.

Speaking on NBC's Meet the Press today, LaPierre said that in the case of the Navy Yard shooting, the problem was that too many people at the facility were unarmed.

"All these brave men and women that are trained in firearms, that signed up to serve in the military, they're largely disarmed on our military bases," LaPierre said. He recommended policy changes that would keep more military personnel armed.

"The problem is, there weren't enough good guys with guns," he said. "When the good guys with guns got there, it stopped."

LaPierre has made similar arguments in the past, including after the shootings last December at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn.

That tragedy, in which school children lost their lives, prompted a push by the president and his allies to change America's gun control laws. But legislation that sprang from the effort failed to get out of the Democratically controlled Senate.

NPR's Liz Halloran noted the uncertainty over the nation's gun laws in a post earlier this week:

"The massacre of 20 school children and six adult school employees at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut last December took the nation to a place of horror that it had never visited.

"Yet little has changed since, leaving the political component of the debate in an uneasy state."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit www.npr.org.

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