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Police: Fingerprint Search Led To 1977 Michigan Prison Escapee’s Arrest In San Diego

Above: Judy Lynn Hayman pleaded guilty in June 1976 to a larceny charge in Michigan, and sentenced to serve between 16 months and two years in custody but escaped after only 10 months.

A Michigan officer's decision to look through old files on fugitives led investigators to a woman who escaped from a Michigan prison 37 years ago and was living in San Diego, authorities said Wednesday.

Judy Lynn Hayman, 60, will be returned to Michigan to complete her sentence for attempted larceny.

"We can't just write it off," said Russ Marlan, spokesman for the Michigan Corrections Department. "We don't have the ability to say, 'It's been a long time. You're free to go.'"

It will be up to the state Parole Board to determine how long Hayman will be imprisoned. She had served eight months of an 18- to 24-month sentence for attempting to steal clothes from a Detroit-area store. She could face a separate criminal charge for the escape.

Hayman's capture wasn't the result of an intense search. It happened mostly because of winter weather and an officer's decision to blow the dust off old files.

Lt. Charles Levens of the Michigan Corrections Department pursues parole violators, but recent severe weather had kept him in the office and off icy roads. He requested the fingerprint cards for all old escapees and sent them to the FBI.

Levens said many police agencies had fingerprints that matched Hayman's but under different names. He gave the information to one of his investigators, Tim Hardville, who tracked her down in San Diego.

"I said, 'Tim, you're going to get your girl here,'" Levens said. "There are two ways to get off our list: a death certificate or a (live) body. It's what the state pays us to do. ... If you're a fugitive, you have an obligation to pay your debt to society."

San Diego police on Monday went to an apartment in the city's Hillcrest neighborhood, where a woman matching Hayman's description answered the door. She identified herself as Jamie Lewis and produced government documents with the name, San Diego police Lt. Kevin Mayer said.

Officers, however, remained suspicious because of inconsistencies in her story and her resemblance to an old Michigan mug shot they were holding.

"Her eyes gave her away," Mayer said. "The eyes in the picture matched the eyes of this woman."

The officers took her to a police station, where she eventually acknowledged being Hayman, Mayer said.

Hayman is being held in a San Diego County jail awaiting extradition to Michigan, where she escaped from the Ypsilanti prison in 1977, Mayer said. He did not know if she had retained an attorney, and no court date had been set.

It wasn't immediately clear how long Hayman had been living in San Diego. She lived in a well-kept, nondescript building blocks from Balboa Park. Her 32-year-old son was visiting when police arrived, and officers said he appeared stunned by their questions.

"This seemed very much a surprise to him," Mayer said.

Neighbors said Hayman lived for several years in the complex, where she went by the name Jamie and mostly kept to herself.

Theresa Padilla said she lived next door to Hayman for more than six years after they moved in around the same time.

She described her neighbor as a "quiet loner, but basically a nice person." Padilla said Hayman spent most of her time indoors except when she walked her Chihuahua, Monty, who was old and had to be put down less than a year ago.

Hayman had photos of three sons on her wall, and at least one son visited her often, taking out the trash and doing other chores, Padilla said. "Her three boys seemed like they were raised well."

Padilla said Hayman didn't appear to be married or have a job. She said she and Hayman spoke infrequently but did share their experiences in battling cancer. Hayman also mentioned living in Detroit and being a fan of Michigan basketball teams.

Padilla was shocked to learn of her neighbor's past after police swarmed the complex Monday.

"It don't make sense, going after this lady for a petty little thing," she said. "They need to go after the molesters, the killers, those who hurt little babies, not someone who stole something when she was 23."

San Diego district attorney spokesman Steve Walker said Hayman is scheduled for her first hearing Thursday morning. If she doesn't fight her extradition, she will be sent immediately to Michigan. If she does contest it, another hearing will be held the following day.

Hayman's case is similar to that of Marie Walsh, who also escaped from a Michigan prison when she was known as Susan LeFevre.

Walsh had served 14 months of a 10-year prison sentence for a heroin deal when she fled in 1976. She was found living under an alias in San Diego in 2008.

Walsh spent 13 more months in prison then returned to San Diego, where she resumed her life with her husband of more than 20 years. She wrote a book called "A Tale of Two Lives" about her ordeal.

Comments

Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | February 6, 2014 at 10:09 a.m. ― 5 months, 3 weeks ago

Hayman's case is similar to that of Marie Walsh, who also escaped from a Michigan prison when she was known as Susan LeFevre.

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a 10 year sentence for being found guilty of dealing heroin is "similar" to a 18 month sentence for attempting to steal clothes?

Ummmmmmm, if you say so.

The article above has a lot of defensive people trying to justify why they are spending tax-payer money to extradite this woman back to Michigan because she tried to steal clothes in the 70s.

Yes, she escaped and that is wrong. Can't she just do a few more months locally and then be done with it? Why do tax-payers have to pay for extradition and a big dog and pony show?

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Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | February 6, 2014 at 10:16 a.m. ― 5 months, 3 weeks ago

Oh that's right, it's because politicans in the United States who "claim" to be "financially fiscal" want to take away safety nets and programs for the poor, but when it comes to the prison-industrial complex they spend into oblivion - Make the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA the WORLD'S number ONE prison state.

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Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | February 6, 2014 at 10:17 a.m. ― 5 months, 3 weeks ago

rank \ country \ prisoners per 100,000 population
1 United States
2 Seychelles 709
3 Saint Kitts and Nevis 701
4 U.S. Virgin Islands 539
5 Cuba 510
6 Rwanda 492
7 Anguilla 487
8 Russia 484
9 British Virgin Islands 460 c.
10 El Salvador 425
11 Bermuda 417
12 Azerbaijan 413
13 Belize 407
14 Grenada 402
15 Panama 401
16 Antigua and Barbuda 395
17 Cayman Islands 382
18 Thailand 381
19 Barbados 377
20 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 376
21 Bahamas 371
22 Sint Maarten 369
23 Dominica 356
24 Palau 348
25 Greenland 340
26 Belarus 335
27 Curaçao 331
28 Guam 316
29 Costa Rica 314
29 Lithuania 314
31 Saint Lucia 313
32 Maldives 311 c.
32 Puerto Rico 311
32 Ukraine 311
35 Latvia 297
36 Kazakhstan 295
37 South Africa 289
38 Mongolia 287
39 Iran 284
39 Swaziland 284
41 Taiwan 280
42 Uruguay 279
43 Bahrain 275
44 Brazil 274
45 Chile 270
46 Cape Verde 267
46 French Guiana 267
48 Northern Mariana Islands 264
49 Guyana 260
50 Trinidad and Tobago 259
51 Estonia 245
52 Colombia 243
53 American Samoa 240
54 Gibraltar 238
54 United Arab Emirates 238
56 Martinique 233
57 Singapore 230
58 Aruba 228
59 Samoa 227
60 Georgia 224
60 Turkmenistan 224
62 Israel 223
63 Poland 222
64 Morocco 220
65 Montenegro 214
66 Dominican Republic 210
67 Mexico 209
68 Botswana 205
68 Slovakia 205
70 Mauritius 202
70 Peru 202
72 Tunisia 199
73 Gabon 196
74 New Zealand 193
75 Macau 191
75 Namibia 191
75 Suriname 191

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Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | February 6, 2014 at 10:18 a.m. ― 5 months, 3 weeks ago

78 Moldova 185
79 Kyrgyzstan 181
80 Fiji 174
81 Hungary 173
82 Turkey 171
83 Guernsey 170
84 Venezuela 169
85 Albania 168
86 Jersey 167
87 Guadeloupe 164
88 Jamaica 163
88 New Caledonia 163
90 Saudi Arabia 162
91 Honduras 159
92 Algeria 156
92 Romania 156
94 Czech Republic 154
95 French Polynesia 153
95 Serbia 153
97 Uzbekistan 152 c.
98 Bulgaria 151
98 Tonga 151
100 Spain 149
101 & England and Wales 148
102 Argentina 147
103 Scotland 146
104 Vietnam 145
105 Malta 144
106 Nauru 139
107 Armenia 138
108 Kuwait 137
109 Ethiopia 136
110 Bhutan 135
111 Portugal 134
112 Australia 130
112 Hong Kong 130
112 Réunion 130
112 Tajikistan 130
116 Zimbabwe 129
117 São Tomé and Príncipe 128
118 Isle of Man 127
119 Malaysia 126
119 Zambia 126 c.
121 Luxembourg 124
122 Macedonia 122
122 Nicaragua 122 c.
124 China 121 or 170[2]
124 Kenya 121
124 Lesotho 121
127 Myanmar 120
127 Tuvalu 120
129 Cameroon 119
130 Lebanon 118
131 Brunei 117
132 Croatia 115
133 Canada 114
134 Philippines 113
135 Bolivia 112
136 Greece 111
137 Iraq 110
138 Cook Islands 109
139 Italy 108
140 Cyprus 106
141 Cambodia 104
142 Austria 103
142 Kiribati 103
144 France 101
144 Mayotte 101
146 Belgium 100
146 Sri Lanka 100
148 Northern Ireland 99
149 Paraguay 97
149 Uganda 97
151 Angola 96
152 Equatorial Guinea 95 c.
152 Haiti 95
152 Jordan 95
155 Ireland 94
156 South Korea 92
157 Monaco 88
158 Guatemala 87
159 Ecuador 86
160 Federated States of Micronesia 85
160 Madagascar 85
162 Djibouti 83
163 Netherlands 82
163 Switzerland 82
165 Libya 81
166 Egypt 80 c.
166 Germany 80
168 Tanzania 78
169 Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina 77
170 Benin 75
170 Republika Srpska 75
172 Afghanistan 74
172 Vanuatu 74
174 Malawi 73
175 Burundi 72
176 Norway 71
177 Laos 69
177 Slovenia 69
179 Denmark 68
180 Sweden 67
181 Kosovo 66 c.
182 South Sudan 65 c.
183 Marshall Islands 64
183 Mozambique 64
183 Senegal 64
183 Togo 64
187 Indonesia 62
188 Oman 61
189 Finland 60
189 Qatar 60 c.
191 Guinea-Bissau 58
191 Syria 58
193 Gambia 56 c.
193 Sudan 56 c.
195 Yemen 55
196 Japan 54
197 Ghana 53
198 Solomon Islands 51
199 Andorra 49
200 Papua New Guinea 48
201 Iceland 47
202 Liberia 46
203 Mauritania 45
203 Nepal 45 c.
205 Bangladesh 42
205 Niger 42
205 Sierra Leone 42
208 Chad 41
209 Pakistan 39
210 Liechtenstein 36
210 Mali 36
212 Ivory Coast 34
213 Democratic Republic of the Congo 33 c.
214 Congo 31 c.
214 Nigeria 31
216 India 30
217 Burkina Faso 28
218 Guinea 25 c.
219 Timor-Leste 22
220 Central African Republic 19
220 Comoros 19 c.
222 Faroe Islands 17
223 San Marino 6

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Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | February 6, 2014 at 10:18 a.m. ― 5 months, 3 weeks ago

So by all means use an expensive force of operatives to extradite a woman who tried to steal some clothes over 30 years ago, what's another several thousand tax payer dollars on top of the BILLIONS we already spend being the world's prison state.

It's too bad our crime statistics aren't any better than countries that imprision a fraction of how many we do.

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Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | February 6, 2014 at 10:23 a.m. ― 5 months, 3 weeks ago

The United States prisoners per 100,000 population figure is missing from the above list, apologies.

It's 716.

Countries in Europe are under 200, and we imprisoning 716 people per 100,000.

That's not normal nor healthy for a country that espouses to be the "Land of the Free" and which is constantly criticizing other nations for their criminal justice systems.

This isn't justice, it's a business model based on exponential growth each year!!

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