skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

Stories for January 13, 2014

Lawyers Seek Justice Department Records On Would-Be Bomber

Jan. 13
Carrie Johnson / NPR

Lawyers for a young Portland man convicted of trying to blow up a Christmas tree ceremony are asking a judge to order the Justice Department to open its files and share "facts and circumstances" of electronic surveillance that prosecutors disclosed only months after his conviction.

Water Bans Lifted In Several West Virginia Areas

Jan. 13
Bill Chappell / NPR
Tease photo

A ban on using tap water has been lifted in at least three areas affected by a chemical spill in West Virginia, where some 300,000 water customers received "do not use" advisories Thursday. Since then, water has been trucked in to the affected area, which includes nine counties.

Best, worst of San Diego Chargers' 10-8 playoff season

Jan. 13
Associated Press
Best, worst of San Diego Chargers' 10-8 playoff season Tease photo

A look at some highlights and lowlights from the San Diego Chargers' 10-8 season that ended with a 24-17 loss in the AFC divisional playoffs to the Denver Broncos.

Six Decades Later, Integration Remains A Work In Progress

Jan. 13
Debbie Elliott / NPR
Tease photo

A federal judge in Little Rock, Ark., approved a settlement today that ends decades of litigation over school desegregation there.

NOVA: Zeppelin Terror Attack

Jan. 13
NOVA: Zeppelin Terror Attack   Tease photo

NOVA reveals the untold story of the biggest flying machines ever made: Germany's war zeppelins, which rained down death on British towns for two and a half terrifying years during World War I. In hands-on experiments, NOVA uncovers how the zeppelins were built and flown, and goes inside the desperate scramble to take down the zeppelins and make the streets of Britain safe again.

Desegregation Pact Gets Judge's Approval In Arkansas

Jan. 13
Bill Chappell / NPR

A long-running school desegregation fight in Arkansas is over, after a federal judge accepted a settlement reached by the state, lawyers for black students, and three school districts in and around Little Rock. Under the deal, the state will no longer have to send payments -- around $70 million this year -- to aid desegregation.

Rep. Susan Davis In San Diego To Discuss Unemployment Benefits

Jan. 13
By Erik Anderson
Tease photo

A few weeks after Congress let a benefits program for the long-term unemployed expire, Rep. Susan Davis spoke with jobless San Diegans about how they've been affected.

California Lawmaker Proposes Extension Of Gun Control Law

Jan. 13
Associated Press

A California lawmaker proposed Monday that the state extend its requirement that gun buyers undergo background checks and register their weapons to include anyone who assembles a firearm at home.

U.S. High Court Hears Arguments On Recess Appointments

Jan. 13
Nina Totenberg / NPR

Supreme Court justices across the ideological spectrum voiced skepticism on Monday about the way President Obama and other presidents have made temporary recess appointments to fill executive branch vacancies.

The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound

Jan. 13
The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound  Tease photo

America's tales about taming the Wild West rarely include women. But in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, more than 100,000 pioneering young women left home to work as waitresses in restaurants located on train platforms along the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway. "The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound" explores the lives, experiences, and contributions of the women who worked for the Fred Harvey restaurant empire.

Arizona Abortion Law Remains Ruled As Unconstitutional

Jan. 13
Julie Rovner / NPR

A new class of restrictive abortion laws, passed in recent years in a swath of states, hinges on the argument that a fetus can feel pain at 20 weeks of gestation.

Google Buys Nest, May Soon Know How Cool You Like Your Home

Jan. 13
Elise Hu / NPR
Tease photo

As further evidence that this is perhaps the year the Internet of everything really becomes a thing, Google paid $3.2 billion in cash for Nest, the home automation company that pioneered smart thermostats and lately, smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

Is '16 And Pregnant' An Effective Form Of Birth Control?

Jan. 13
NPR Staff / NPR

The U.S. teen birth rate -- one of the highest in the developed world -- has been dropping in recent years. There are a number of reasons for the decrease, and a new study attributes a portion of the decline to an unlikely cause: MTV's 16 and Pregnant,a show that takes a brutally honest look at what life is like for pregnant teens.

San Diego's STD Rate Higher Than National Average

Jan. 13
Midday Edition
By City News Service
Tease photo

In figures compiled by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, increases were discovered both nationally and locally for chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis in 2012, the most recent year for which figures are available. We take a look at why San Diego is outpacing the rest of the nation in STD increases.

High Court Won't Hear 'Fetal Pain' Abortion Case As Debate Rages

Jan. 13
Liz Halloran, Julie Rovner
Tease photo

A new class of restrictive abortion laws, passed in recent years in a swath of states, hinges on the argument that a fetus can feel pain at 20 weeks of gestation.

'Lone Survivor' Appeals To Military And Civilians, Tops Box Office

Jan. 13
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

"Lone Survivor," a movie about the 2005 Navy SEALs mission known as Operation Red Wings, hit number one at the box office. A look a Twitter shines a light on why civilians were as impressed with the movie as folks in the military.

Health care signups: More older Americans so far

Jan. 13
Associated Press

Administration officials released age and gender breakdowns on Monday for more than 2 million Americans who had enrolled for government-subsidized private insurance by the end of December.

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: 1964

Jan. 13
By Jennifer Robinson
AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: 1964  Tease photo

It was the year of the Beatles and the Civil Rights Act; of the Gulf of Tonkin and Barry Goldwater’s presidential campaign; the year that cities across the country erupted in violence and Americans tried to make sense of the Kennedy assassination. Based on The Last Innocent Year: America in 1964 by award-winning journalist Jon Margolis, this film follows some of the most prominent figures of the time — Lyndon B. Johnson, Martin Luther King, Jr., Barry Goldwater, Betty Friedan — and brings out from the shadows the actions of ordinary Americans whose frustrations, ambitions and anxieties began to turn the country onto a new and different course.

Search Resumes For Missing Navy Pilot From Santee (Video)

Jan. 13
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

The Navy has expanded search and recovery efforts at the crash site of the MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter that went down Jan. 8 off the coast of Virginia. Still missing is Navy Lt. Sean Snyder, 39, of Santee.

A Life Of Pain And Hope — Former San Diego Foster Care Children Speak Out

Jan. 13
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
Tease photo

Giving foster care children something to hold onto — that's what a local group says their CASA program offers children. These CASA's or court-appointed special advocates, are volunteers who represent the interests of children in foster care. Now, some of those grown-up children are speaking out about how their CASA made a positive impact on their lives.

The Interplanetary Beliefs Of An Unusual Group In El Cajon

Jan. 13
Midday Edition
Tease photo

A new documentary, "Children of the Stars," explores Unarius, a group based in El Cajon who believe human beings have all lived millions of years, and multiple lives, spanning the history of the universe.

What Will Define San Diego In 2014?

Jan. 13
Midday Edition
Evening Edition
Tease photo

San Diego was defined largely by the mayor sexual harassment scandal in 2013; what issues do you think will define San Diego in 2014?

San Diego-Based USS Rentz Intercepts $10 Million Worth Of Cocaine

Jan. 13
By Beth Ford Roth
Tease photo

The San Diego-based Navy frigate USS Rentz intercepted roughly 313 kilograms (690 pounds) of cocaine in the month of December, while taking part in counter drug trafficking operations in the coastal waters off Central America. The street value of all that cocaine? About $10.4 million.

Former Bell City Administrator To Plead Guilty On Tax Evasion Charges

Jan. 13
By City News Service

Robert Rizzo, former top administrator in the city of Bell, is scheduled to plead guilty Monday on charges of federal tax evasion.

INDEPENDENT LENS: More Than A Month

Jan. 13
INDEPENDENT LENS: More Than A Month  Tease photo

Shukree Hassan Tilghman, a 29-year-old African-American filmmaker, is on a cross-country campaign to end Black History Month. Through this tongue-in-cheek journey, “More Than a Month” investigates what the treatment of history tells us about race and equality in a “post-racial” America.

New Problem For Christie: Audit Of Sandy-Related Spending

Jan. 13
Mark Memmott / NPR
Tease photo

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is going to examine how the state of New Jersey spent $25 million of the federal aid it received after 2012's Hurricane Sandy, Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., has announced.

Woman's fatal fall from Sunset Cliffs under investigation by San Diego police

Jan. 13
By City News Service

An investigation was underway Monday into the death of a 25-year-old Chicago woman who fell about 40 to 50 feet from Sunset Cliffs while posing for a picture.

Airliner Lands At Wrong Airport, Barely Misses Going Off Runway

Jan. 13
Scott Neuman / NPR
Tease photo

Investigators are trying to figure out what caused a Southwest Airlines 737 to land at the wrong airport in Missouri, narrowly averting a slide off the end of the runway.

Supreme Court Ends Arizona's Bid To Reinstate 20-Week Abortion Ban

Jan. 13
Eyder Peralta / NPR

The United States Supreme Court on Monday refused to revisit a lower court ruling that struck down Arizona's ban on most abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

Kevin Faulconer leads David Alvarez in latest poll for San Diego mayoral race

Jan. 13
10News.com

According to the latest 10News/U-T San Diego poll released Sunday morning, San Diego City Councilman Kevin Faulconer has the support of 53 percent of likely voters.

Barrio Logan community to hold groundbreaking for gateway sign

Jan. 13
By City News Service

A groundbreaking ceremony is scheduled Monday for an 80-foot-wide community sign that will welcome people to Barrio Logan the same way similar signs do in the Gaslamp Quarter and Hillcrest.

Red flag warning issued for San Diego County inland valleys, mountains until Wednesday

Jan. 13
By City News Service

The National Weather Service issued a red flag warning for the inland valleys and mountains until 6 p.m. Wednesday, saying sustained winds of 20 to 30 miles per hour and gusts up to 60 mph were likely.

Blood Test To Predict Heart Attacks Found By Scripps Researchers

Jan. 13
By Tom Fudge
Tease photo

Scripps scientists have found a bio-marker in the blood that can predict heart attacks. The next question: How far in advance do they appear?

Tim Mays Talks 25 Years Of Running The Casbah

Jan. 13
By Angela Carone
Tease photo

For fans of alternative rock music, The Casbah on Kettner Boulevard had been a promised land for 25 years. We talk to co-founder and owner Tim Mays about The Casbah's anniversary.

Camp Pendleton Marines, Sailors Head To Afghanistan For War's Final Chapter

Jan. 13
By Susan Murphy
Tease photo

Hundreds of Marines from Camp Pendleton are deploying to Afghanistan to close out the final chapter of America’s longest war.

California Immigrant Advocates See Health Care, Professional Licenses As Next Battle

Jan. 13
By Jill Replogle

On the heels of legislative victories in 2013, immigrant advocates in California are planning their next major fights.

Rants And Raves: The Golden Globes 2014

Jan. 13
By Beth Accomando
Tease photo

Last night’s Golden Globes were made more exciting by a power outage in my neighborhood; not a lot of surprises and no one film dominated.

Marine biologist sentenced for feeding killer whales

Jan. 13
Associated Press

Nancy Black was sentenced Monday to three years of probation, $12,500 in fines and 300 hours of community service after pleading guilty to violating the Marine Mammal Protection Act by feeding killer whales in the wild, a misdemeanor.

Decades Later, Desegregation Still On The Docket In Little Rock

Jan. 13
Debbie Elliott / NPR

In Little Rock, Ark., on Monday, a federal judge is considering a deal that would end one of the longest running and most notorious school desegregation cases in the country. The state, its largest school districts and lawyers representing black students have agreed to settle a complex lawsuit over unequal education.

Poverty As A Social Condition

Jan. 13
NPR Staff / NPR
Tease photo

Financial writer Tim Harford, author of the new book The Undercover Economist Strikes Back, says the poverty line for a single American in 2012 was $30.52 per day. But Harford, talking to NPR's David Greene, says that it's also about how people think of you and how you think of yourself.

Balance Of Power At Stake In High Court Case

Jan. 13
Nina Totenberg / NPR
Tease photo

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Monday in a big constitutional fight over the balance of power between the president and the Senate.