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Stories for January 17, 2014

Tease photo for Man’s Body Found Inside Car Linked To Christmas Eve Double Murder At Mall

Man’s Body Found Inside Car Linked To Christmas Eve Double Murder At Mall

Jan. 17
By City News Service

A car linked to a Christmas Eve double-killing at Westfield Mission Valley mall was found Friday afternoon in the city of Riverside with an unidentified dead man inside, according to police.

UC San Diego Receives Record Number Of Applicants

Jan. 17
By City News Service

UC San Diego received more than 89,000 applications from prospective freshmen and transfer students for next year — a school record.

California School Districts Given New, More Flexible Spending Guidelines

Jan. 17
By Kyla Calvert

California school districts now have to draw up first-of-their kind spending plans under new statewide rules.

Tease photo for San Diego Economy Expected To Continue Improving

San Diego Economy Expected To Continue Improving

Jan. 17
By Erik Anderson

San Diego's economy is expected to continue its slow ascent in the coming year.

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California's Governor Declares Drought State Of Emergency

Jan. 17
Bill Chappell / NPR

Saying that his state must take steps to plan for prolonged water shortages, Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency over an extended drought Friday. California faces "water shortfalls in the driest year in recorded state history," according to the governor's office.

Tease photo for SDSU Students Look Forward To Opening Of New Student Center

SDSU Students Look Forward To Opening Of New Student Center

Jan. 17
By Dwane Brown, Emily Burns

San Diego State University students returning to school next week will able to use the school's new LEED platinum Student Union.

Tease photo for Cracking The Endorsement Code In The San Diego Mayor's Race

Cracking The Endorsement Code In The San Diego Mayor's Race

Jan. 17
By Sandhya Dirks

This week interim Mayor Todd Gloria endorsed David Alvarez and Father Joe Carroll endorsed Kevin Faulconer to be the next mayor of San Diego. But what does it all mean?

Tease photo for Russia's Open Book: Writing In The Age Of Putin

Russia's Open Book: Writing In The Age Of Putin

Jan. 17

This documentary tells the story of America and Europe’s love of Russian literature and introduces audiences to a new generation of Russian writers. With readings by host Stephen Fry, this program features writers such as Dmitry Bykov, Mariam Petrosyan, Zakhar Prilepin, Anna Starobinets, Vladimir Sorokin and Lyudmila Ulitskaya.

Federal Judge Says N.C. Ultrasound Abortion Law Is Illegal

Jan. 17
Bill Chappell / NPR

A controversial North Carolina law requiring women who want to have an abortion to undergo an ultrasound scan is illegal, according to a federal judge's ruling issued Friday. The state's law required that the women have a medical professional tell them what the image depicts. It also said the women should "listen to the heartbeat of the unborn child."

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Supreme Court To Decide If Warrant Needed To Search Cellphone

Jan. 17
Nina Totenberg / NPR

The U.S. Supreme Court is delving into the technology-versus-privacy debate, agreeing to hear two cases that test whether police making an arrest may search cellphones without a warrant.

Obama Signs Trillion-Dollar Federal Spending Bill

Jan. 17
Bill Chappell / NPR

President Obama signed the $1.1 trillion spending bill into law Friday afternoon, enacting more than 1,500 pages of legislation that received broad support in the House and Senate earlier this week. The expansive bill ensures the U.S. government won't face a potential shutdown until at least October.

Tease photo for Jerry Coleman Memorial On Saturday At Petco Park

Jerry Coleman Memorial On Saturday At Petco Park

Jan. 17
By City News Service

A public memorial service will be held Saturday at Petco Park for beloved San Diego Padres broadcaster Jerry Coleman.

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Chemical Company In West Virginia Water Crisis Files For Bankruptcy

Jan. 17
Bill Chappell / NPR

Freedom Industries, the West Virginia company that's been blamed for a chemical spill that left around 300,000 people without water for days, has filed for bankruptcy. The chemical used in cleaning coal leaked into the Elk River and into the public water system.

Video Surfaces Of Border Agent Punching Man On Ground

Jan. 17
By Michel Marizco

A video showing a U.S. Border Patrol agent in the San Diego Sector punching and kneeing a man already lying on the ground raises questions about the Border Patrol’s use of force.

Tease photo for Navy Holds Memorial For Helicopter Crash Victims

Navy Holds Memorial For Helicopter Crash Victims

Jan. 17
Associated Press

About 1,200 sailors in dress-blue uniforms packed an auditorium on Friday to remember three of their colleagues who died after their helicopter crashed in the Atlantic Ocean.

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Tom Coburn, GOP Budget Hawk And Obama Friend, To Leave Senate

Jan. 17
Liz Halloran / NPR

Tom Coburn will leave the Senate with a reputation as "Dr. No," but not necessarily as doctrinaire.

Loan Repayment Program For Nursing Students Accepting Applications

Jan. 17
By Deb Welsh

A federal program that repays school loans partially for nursing students in exchange for taking a job in an underserved area is now accepting applications.

Tease photo for Supreme Court Takes Case Of Cellphone Search Of San Diego Man

Supreme Court Takes Case Of Cellphone Search Of San Diego Man

Jan. 17
Associated Press

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide whether police need a warrant to search the cellphones of people they have arrested, including one case involving a man from San Diego.

Tease photo for In Defense Of Controversial Surveillance Program, Obama Points To San Diego

In Defense Of Controversial Surveillance Program, Obama Points To San Diego

Jan. 17
By Tarryn Mento

When President Obama announced changes to how the government collects Americans' phone data, he also defended the program, citing an instance in San Diego.

Tease photo for AMERICAN MASTERS: Salinger

AMERICAN MASTERS: Salinger

Jan. 17
By Jennifer Robinson

Filmmaker Shane Salerno’s 10-year investigation culminates in the first work to get beyond "The Catcher in the Rye" author's impenetrable wall of privacy and seclusion. AMERICAN MASTERS presents the exclusive, never-before-seen director’s cut of "Salinger" as the series’ 200th episode, featuring 15 minutes of new material. Salinger is an intricately structured mystery that reveals the author’s private world: how World War II influenced his life and work, his painstaking writing methods, his many relationships with young women, and the literary secrets he left behind after his death in 2010.

What's Inside This Mystery House In North Carolina?

Jan. 17
Bill Chappell / NPR

From the outside, it's nothing special. Just another 1970s-era house with a landscaped yard, white columns, and green shutters. Thousands of people drive past the split-level on Wade Avenue in Raleigh every month, without a second glance.

Tease photo for Roundtable:  Mayor's Race; Arevalos Victim Accused; State Of The State Of The City

Roundtable: Mayor's Race; Arevalos Victim Accused; State Of The State Of The City

Jan. 17
By Pat Finn, Mark Sauer

The San Diego mayor's race gets nasty quick. A victim of convicted San Diego Police Officer Anthony Arevalos is accused of bribery. Assessing the state of the State of the City address.

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Analysts: Credit Card Hacking Goes Much Further Than Target

Jan. 17
Elise Hu / NPR

The holiday season data breach at Target that hit more than 70 million consumers was part of a wide and highly skilled international hacking campaign that's "almost certainly" based in Russia. That's according to a report prepared for federal and private investigators by Dallas-based cybersecurity firm iSight Partners.

Tease photo for MARTHA BAKES: Tuiles

MARTHA BAKES: Tuiles

Jan. 17

Tuile is a French word for tile, and when these paper-thin cookies are presented in rows, they’re meant to look like the curved tiles on rooftops. Learn how to make five variations, beginning with the basic tuile batter. Martha then demonstrates lacy nut cookies, brandy snap cups, the ubiquitous fortune cookie, and chocolate tuile ice cream cones.

Wells Fargo, U.S. Bank To End Payday Loan Program

Jan. 17
Robert Benincasa / NPR

Wells Fargo & Co., Fifth Third Bank and U.S. Bank said Friday that they will stop offering "deposit advances," a kind of payday loan that had come under fire by federal regulators last year.

Tease photo for California Governor Declares Drought State Of Emergency

California Governor Declares Drought State Of Emergency

Jan. 17
By Tarryn Mentoand Associated Press

Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought state of emergency Friday morning amid one of California's driest winters on record.

Tease photo for Obama Backs Limits On NSA Phone Collections

Obama Backs Limits On NSA Phone Collections

Jan. 17
Associated Press

Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, President Barack Obama on Friday called for ending the government's control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing such records.

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Coming Up: Obama Outlines NSA Changes

Jan. 17
Mark Memmott / NPR

President Obama is this morning set to announce the changes he believes need to be made to the way the National Security Agency collects, analyzes and stores massive amounts of data about the phone calls and electronic communications of people around the world -- including Americans.

Four Escondido Charter Schools Close Amid 'Specific Threat'

Jan. 17
By City News Service

Four Escondido charter schools canceled all classes Friday in response to an online threat about a planned shooting at one of the campuses.

Tease photo for Alleged 'Revenge Porn' Website Opertator Pleads Not Guilty

Alleged 'Revenge Porn' Website Opertator Pleads Not Guilty

Jan. 17
By City News Serviceand Kelly Wheeler

A San Diego man accused of running a so-called "revenge porn" website plead not guilty Friday to 31 felony charges of conspiracy, identity theft and extortion.

Tease photo for Crews Chase Flare-Ups In Wildfire Burning North Of Los Angeles

Crews Chase Flare-Ups In Wildfire Burning North Of Los Angeles

Jan. 17
Associated Press

Firefighters were chasing early-morning flare-ups Friday in a damaging wildfire that was largely tamed but kept thousands of people from their homes in the foothill suburbs northeast of Los Angeles.

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Pennsylvania Voter ID Law Struck Down

Jan. 17
Mark Memmott / NPR

Ruling that "voting laws are designed to assure a free and fair election" and that Pennsylvania's "Voter ID Law does not further this goal," a state judge on Friday struck down that controversial statute.

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How Do We Cultivate Women Leaders?

Jan. 17
NPR/TED Staff / NPR

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg gets to the bottom line for women who want to lead.

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How Do Leaders Deal With Failure?

Jan. 17
NPR/TED Staff / NPR

Four-star general Stanley McChrystal recounts some tough lessons about leadership he gained from the front lines -- to listen, to learn, and to address the possibility of failure.

Surgeon General Adds New Risks To Long List Of Smoking's Harms

Jan. 17
Richard Knox / NPR

Acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniak is the latest in a long line of surgeons general who have tried to pound the final nails into the coffin of America's smoking habit.

Tease photo for Artist David Adey's Ambitious New Solo Exhibit At La Jolla Gallery

Artist David Adey's Ambitious New Solo Exhibit At La Jolla Gallery

Jan. 17
By Angela Carone

If artist David Adey has an idea, he's going to figure out how to execute it; Adey’s new show at the Scott White Contemporary Art gallery in La Jolla offers more big ideas brought to life.

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Congress Blocks Slaughtering Horses For Meat In U.S.

Jan. 17
Allison Aubrey / NPR

When a federal ban on slaughtering horses to produce horse meat was lifted several years back, ranchers including Rick De Los Santos, a New Mexico rancher and owner of Valley Meat Co., stepped up to start operations with an aim to export the meat.

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The Birth Of The Minimum Wage In America

Jan. 17
David Kestenbaum / NPR

In 1895, legislators in New York state decided to improve working conditions in what at the time could be a deadly profession: baking bread.