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KPBS Drought Tracker Update: Few Patches Of Drought Left In California

DATA SOURCES: Rainfall data comes from a weighted average of 96 weather stations throughout the state. Snowpack data represents the average of three different multi-station measures of the northern, central and southern Sierra snowpack. Scripps Institution of Oceanography researchers, through the California Nevada Applications Program RISA and the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes, helped compile the data.

KPBS Drought Tracker Update: Few Patches Of Drought Left In California

GUESTS:

David Wagner, reporter, KPBS News

Dan Cayan, climate researcher, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Transcript

In a break from the stormy weather we've been seeing lately, San Diego is currently back to being sunny and warm.

But an update from the KPBS Drought Tracker shows this wet season is still shaping up to be a record-breaker for California.

As of Friday morning, statewide rainfall is at 164 percent of what normally falls between October 1 and April 1. The average Sierra snowpack measurement is even more impressive at 178 percent of the normal April 1 reading.

"The snowpack is getting very close to 200 percent of normal for the central and southern Sierra," said Scripps Institution of Oceanography climate researcher David Pierce, who helped compile this data.

"Not quite as much in the northern [Sierra] — but the snowpack is key to our water resources in summer, so that's really good."

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, only 8 percent of the state is still in some form of drought. A lingering patch of severe drought is still present in Imperial County.

"We've been very lucky to have this very wet winter," Pierce said. "Especially in the northern part of the state, it's breaking records at the moment. We'll just have to see if that holds up for the next few weeks."

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