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Watchdog Group Evaluates Climate Action Plans In San Diego County

Climate Action Campaign supporters gathered at Park De La Cruz Tuesday to dis...

Credit: Matt Hoffman/KPBS

Above: Climate Action Campaign supporters gathered at Park De La Cruz Tuesday to discuss their 2017 "Climate Action Report Card" for San Diego County.

Watchdog Group Evaluates Climate Action Plans In San Diego County

GUEST:

Sophie Wolfram, policy advocate and education coordinator, Climate Action Campaign

Transcript

The Climate Action Campaign said while most cities are working toward climate action plans, they are struggling with actually implementing the plans.

Monday the Climate Action Campaign released its annual "Climate Action Plan Report Card."

San Diego and Encinitas received the highest gold rating for their climate action plans, followed by Solana Beach with silver and Del Mar with bronze.

Nicole Capretz heads the watchdog group and helped create the city of San Diego’s original climate action plan. This year Capretz said they looked at how well each San Diego county municipality was adopting their plans.

"That includes the city of San Diego and they got a bronze," said Capretz. "So that was our highest score region-wide and so we want to change that."

RELATED: San Diego Climate Report Shows Progress — Thanks To Whom?

For implementation, Carlsbad scored the second highest, followed by Del Mar, National City and San Marcos. The Climate Action campaign only evaluated progress for cities that have had climate action plans for at least a year.

Solana Beach adopted their climate action plan last July, and scored a silver for their overall plan, which includes a commitment to zero emissions by 2035.

"I think it’s appropriate for the stage were in, since we haven’t started the implementation plan," said Dan King, Solana Beach's assistant city manager.

King said the implementation plan will be brought to city council for approval soon. Like other cities, Solana Beach is trying to figure out how much implementing a climate plan will cost taxpayers.

"It’s a huge task to actually reduce our carbon footprint in half," said Capretz. "That requires staff, that requires people kind of shepherding through these changes through the process... So yes it requires an investment in resources. And unfortunately, cities aren’t quite doing that yet."

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