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Roundtable: Family-Sponsored Visas, IRC Investigation And Cross-Border Animal Smuggling

Roundtable: Family-Sponsored Visas, IRC Investigation, Unpermitted Shooting Range, Cross-Border Animal Smuggling Operation

PANEL:

JW August, investigative producer, NBC 7 San Diego

Kristina Davis, reporter, San Diego Union-Tribune

Tarryn Mento, reporter, KPBS News

Kate Morrissey, reporter, San Diego Union-Tribune

Transcript

A CLOSER LOOK AT A VISA PROGRAM PRESIDENT TRUMP HAS VOWED TO END

The Story

Some call it 'family reunification.' Others call it 'chain migration.' Either way, President Trump has vowed to end the family-sponsored visa program. He said during his State of the Union address last month that under the program a single immigrant can bring in "virtually unlimited numbers of distant relatives."

Kate Morrissey of the San Diego Union-Tribune took a look at how the program actually works.

The Conversation

-Who can be sponsored for a green card under the program?

-How long do family members have to wait for a green card?

-Is there support for ending the program in Congress?

RELATED: 'Chain migration' or 'family reunification'? How the family-sponsored visa program works

IRC INVESTIGATION UPDATE

The Story

A San Diego nonprofit tasked with resettling refugees has faced violations for overcrowding. Now, Tarryn Mento of KPBS News reports federal monitors knew about the problem last year, but the San Diego International Rescue Committee continued to pack refugees into apartments, disregarding their own occupancy guidelines.

The Conversation

-What happened to families who were kicked out of their apartments for violating their leases?

-Has the IRC changed the way they place families, based on the KPBS investigation?

-How is the sharp decrease in incoming refugees affecting the organization?

RELATED: Federal Monitors Warned San Diego Refugee Nonprofit Of Problems With Resettlement Practices

UNPERMITTED GUN RANGE POPS UP IN ESCONDIDO

The Story

Residents of a quiet community in North County have been dealing with a problem they did not foresee when they moved there: gunfire.

It is not just the noise that has neighbors nervous. They are also worried about stray bullets and fire danger.

An NBC investigation looked into why shooters on the 22-acre plot of land near the San Diego Safari Park are ignoring red flag warnings and threatening neighbors with arrest when they complain.

The Conversation

-Who owns the property?

-Do you need a permit needed to operate a shooting range?

-Are there regulations in place to protect residents?

RELATED: Gun Range Angers Residents

ANIMAL SMUGGLING OPERATION EXPOSED

The Story

As a border town, San Diego sees its share of smuggling. We regularly hear about drugs, guns and people being smuggled across the border. But, Kristina Davis and Joshua Emerson Smith of the San Diego Union-Tribune write that prosecutors allege the illegal trade includes exotic animals too.

And, the story about a teenager attempting to smuggle an adorable tiger cub through the San Diego-Mexico border last summer is actually more complicated than originally reported.

The Conversation

-What do we know about the alleged teen smuggler?

-How big of a problem is the illegal animal trade?

-What happens to the animals brought here illegally?

RELATED: Teen sentenced to six months in prison for smuggling border tiger

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