Skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

Nonprofit Makes Final Push To Boost Voter Turnout In City Heights

Mid-City CAN staff canvass a neighborhood to get out the vote, June 5, 2018.

Photo by Megan Burks

Above: Mid-City CAN staff canvass a neighborhood to get out the vote, June 5, 2018.

During the 2014 primary, well under 5,000 City Heights residents came out to vote. It was one of the lowest turnout precincts in the county. Today, community nonprofit Mid-City CAN expects to top that — with new and unlikely voters alone.

Volunteers and staff with the group spent election day knocking on doors and making phone calls. They weren’t asking people to vote a certain way. Instead, they were just asking them to cast their ballots.

“We’re talking to people and engaging them and letting them know why it is important, as opposed to an electoral campaign that comes in and says, ‘Hey, vote for this candidate,’ and then they leave,” said Griselda Ramirez, who heads the effort. “We’re there from beginning to end, from when they register to vote to when they go to the polls.”

RELATED: San Diego Election Turnout Predicted At 40 To 45 Percent, Registrar Says

Since April, Ramirez and her team have contacted thousands of City Heights residents in an effort to drive up the community’s voter turnout rate. From those contacts, they’ve identified 5,000 people who were unlikely to vote without a little push. It also registered 1,000 new voters.

Turnout is typically low in the neighborhood. Canvasser Victor Ponce, 24, said that’s because many families there are like his own.

“I’ve now started to vote. That’s not where I come from — my family background,” he said. “Nobody was ever encouraged to go out and vote. My mom doesn’t have the right to vote because she’s not a citizen.”

A similar, but much smaller, effort by the nonprofit in 2016 brought 1,000 out of the 1,500 unlikely voters it identified, a success rate of 67 percent.

Audio

Volunteers in City Heights spent election day knocking on doors and making phone calls. They weren’t asking people to vote a certain way. Instead, KPBS education reporter Megan Burks says they were just asking them to cast their ballots.

Transcript

Want more KPBS news?
Find us on Twitter and Facebook, or subscribe to our newsletters.

To view PDF documents, Download Acrobat Reader.