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Nature: Moment Of Impact

The natural world is filled with “moments of impact” – the split seconds when animals come into contact with each other and the world around them. Previously many of these moments were too fast or too hidden for us to see. But now new camera technologies reveal what’s behind these remarkable moments, and cutting edge animations illustrate the “inside story” of animal bioengineering that allows each moment of impact to take place.

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the Cuban crocodile’s amazing ability to jump as much as six feet to catch its prey.

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the Cuban crocodile’s amazing ability to jump as much as six feet to catch its prey.

Credit: ©NGHT, Inc./WNET.ORG

Image of an eagle in flight catching a rabbit. An eagle, with orbs larger than its brain, can spot a rabbit or other prey from hundreds of feet away. A rabbit skull is built on a shock-absorbing joint, helping to stabilize vision while leaping at top-speed to escape predators.

Image of an eagle in flight catching a rabbit. An eagle, with orbs larger than its brain, can spot a rabbit or other prey from hundreds of feet away. A rabbit skull is built on a shock-absorbing joint, helping to stabilize vision while leaping at top-speed to escape predators.

Credit: ©NGHT, Inc./WNET.ORG

This program takes an innovative and revolutionary look at the bio-engineering of “how animals work.” Pictured: A fringe-lipped bat catching frog.

This program takes an innovative and revolutionary look at the bio-engineering of “how animals work.” Pictured: A fringe-lipped bat catching frog.

Credit: ©Carol Farneti Foster

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the bio-engineering of an osprey as it dives for fish.

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the bio-engineering of an osprey as it dives for fish.

Credit: ©NGHT, Inc./WNET.ORG

A chameleon use its fast, telescoping tongue to catch an insect meal.

A chameleon use its fast, telescoping tongue to catch an insect meal.

Credit: ©NGHT, Inc./WNET.ORG

A basilisk lizard “walks” on water to catch a butterfly.

A basilisk lizard “walks” on water to catch a butterfly.

Credit: Credit: ©NGHT, Inc./WNET.ORG

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the ingenuous defensive strategy of a squirrel when confronted with a rattlesnake (shown). The snake hunts by using heat-sensing pits on the side of its head. The squirrel flicks its tail to increase its heat profile to fool the snake into believing it’s larger than it actually is.

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the ingenuous defensive strategy of a squirrel when confronted with a rattlesnake (shown). The snake hunts by using heat-sensing pits on the side of its head. The squirrel flicks its tail to increase its heat profile to fool the snake into believing it’s larger than it actually is.

Credit: ©NGHT, Inc./WNET.ORG

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the head-on collision of bison and the extraordinary bodily construction of these dominant bulls, from a rock-hard skull to the ability to increase the release of androgen hormones to reduce sensitivity to pain.

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the head-on collision of bison and the extraordinary bodily construction of these dominant bulls, from a rock-hard skull to the ability to increase the release of androgen hormones to reduce sensitivity to pain.

Credit: ©NGHT, Inc./WNET.ORG

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the dynamic engineering of a woodpecker’s skull and brain that allows it to withstand forces 20 times a boxer’s knockout punch.

Using the latest state-of-the-art imaging technologies, this episode examines the dynamic engineering of a woodpecker’s skull and brain that allows it to withstand forces 20 times a boxer’s knockout punch.

Credit: ©NGHT, Inc./WNET.ORG

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