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San Andreas Fault

Mud flies as carbon dioxide gas from deep underground fissures escapes through geothermal mudpots, or mud volcanoes, over the southern San Andreas earthquake fault near the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge on January 16, 2010 near Calipatria, California.

Mud flies as carbon dioxide gas from deep underground fissures escapes through geothermal mudpots, or mud volcanoes, over the southern San Andreas earthquake fault near the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge on January 16, 2010 near Calipatria, California.

Photo by David McNew

Credit: Getty Images

UC Irvine earthquake researcher Lisa Grant Ludwig

UC Irvine earthquake researcher Lisa Grant Ludwig

Photo by Daniel A. Anderson

Credit: UC Irvine

UC Irvine and Arizona State researchers study trenches across the San Andreas fault, radiocarbon-dated sediment samples from dry stream channels and historic weather data for the Carrizo Plain to get a glimpse into an engine of large earthquakes.

UC Irvine and Arizona State researchers study trenches across the San Andreas fault, radiocarbon-dated sediment samples from dry stream channels and historic weather data for the Carrizo Plain to get a glimpse into an engine of large earthquakes.

Credit: UC Irvine

UC Irvine researchers labels a trench near the Carrizo section of the San Andreas fault.

UC Irvine researchers labels a trench near the Carrizo section of the San Andreas fault.

Photo by Sinan Akciz

Credit: UC Irvine

The San Andreas Fault is the sliding boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate. It slices California in two from Cape Mendocino to the Mexican border. San Diego, Los Angeles and Big Sur are on the Pacific Plate. San Francisco, Sacramento and the Sierra Nevada are on the North American Plate.

The San Andreas Fault is the sliding boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate. It slices California in two from Cape Mendocino to the Mexican border. San Diego, Los Angeles and Big Sur are on the Pacific Plate. San Francisco, Sacramento and the Sierra Nevada are on the North American Plate.

Photo by David Lynch

Credit: The San Andreas Fault

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