skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

← Back to photo galleries

Nature: Cuba: The Accidental Eden

Cuba may have been restricted politically and economically for the past 50 years, but its borders have remained open to wildlife for which Cuba’s undeveloped islands are an irresistible draw. While many islands in the Caribbean have poisoned or paved over their ecological riches on land and in the sea in pursuit of a growing tourist industry, Cuba’s wild landscapes have remained virtually untouched, creating a safe haven for rare and intriguing indigenous animals, as well as for hundreds of species of migrating birds and marine creatures.

Baby green turtles swimming at breeding center in Cuba.

Baby green turtles swimming at breeding center in Cuba.

Credit: Courtesy of Doug Shultz

Biologist Gonzalo Nodarse digs up green turtle eggs to be relocated.

Biologist Gonzalo Nodarse digs up green turtle eggs to be relocated.

Credit: Courtesy of Doug Shultz

Cuban crocodiles warming up on the shore.

Cuban crocodiles warming up on the shore.

Credit: Courtesy of Doug Shultz

Yellow polymita snail

Yellow polymita snail

Credit: Courtesy of Doug Shultz

Flamingos feeding near Cayo Coco.

Flamingos feeding near Cayo Coco.

Credit: Courtesy of Doug Shultz

Tobacco farmer working the fields with mogotes in background.

Tobacco farmer working the fields with mogotes in background.

Credit: Courtesy of Doug Shultz

Adult Eleutherodactylus Iberia, smallest frog in the Northern hemisphere.

Adult Eleutherodactylus Iberia, smallest frog in the Northern hemisphere.

Credit: Courtesy of Doug Shultz

Cacti and mountains on Cuba's western coast.

Cacti and mountains on Cuba's western coast.

Credit: Courtesy of Doug Shultz

Forgot your password?