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California Charreadas

There's a sport played by many Mexicans and Mexican-Americans in a town near you, but you probably haven’t heard of it. Some people call it "Mexican Rodeo". But despite its popularity, it's increasingly hard for its colorful riders to find a place to practice.

Filemon Jara Sr. of San Ysidro gets his horse ready for a Sunday charreada. Pico Rivera, CA.

Filemon Jara Sr. of San Ysidro gets his horse ready for a Sunday charreada. Pico Rivera, CA.

Credit: Photo by Roberto "Bear" Guerra

The charros gather in the arena before the competition begins.

The charros gather in the arena before the competition begins.

Credit: Photo by Roberto "Bear" Guerra

A charro practices the "floreada" or lasso skills as he rides behind a wild mare.

A charro practices the "floreada" or lasso skills as he rides behind a wild mare.

Credit: Photo by Roberto "Bear" Guerra

One charro watches another in the very first of the charro tricks, the "cala de caballo", which is meant to show off the horse's discipline.

One charro watches another in the very first of the charro tricks, the "cala de caballo", which is meant to show off the horse's discipline.

Credit: Photo by Roberto "Bear" Guerra

A young boy in full charro gear, with a shirt emblazoned with the city where his father rides: San Ysidro. Men are introduced to charreria from the time they're very little.

A young boy in full charro gear, with a shirt emblazoned with the city where his father rides: San Ysidro. Men are introduced to charreria from the time they're very little.

Credit: Photo by Roberto "Bear" Guerra

Filemon Jara Sr. & Filemon Jara Jr. represent two generations of charros from Mexico and the U.S., respectively.

Filemon Jara Sr. & Filemon Jara Jr. represent two generations of charros from Mexico and the U.S., respectively.

Credit: Photo by Roberto "Bear" Guerra