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Decriminalizing Graffiti

Police across the country have increasingly high tech ways to catch graffiti artists. But some taggers in California say they’re tired of being associated with gangs and crime. There’s a movement underfoot to change their image.

Kyle Boatwright, a.k.a Sain, looks through "Subway Art", a 1980's bible for aspiring graffiti artists.

Kyle Boatwright, a.k.a Sain, looks through "Subway Art", a 1980's bible for aspiring graffiti artists.

Photo by Angela Carone

Graffiti art class students practice their tag on paper before they go on a wall.

Graffiti art class students practice their tag on paper before they go on a wall.

Photo by Angela Carone

Students practice their tag over and over again by passing down their sketchbooks and comparing each other's styles.

Students practice their tag over and over again by passing down their sketchbooks and comparing each other's styles.

Photo by Angela Carone

This is Carlie Schultz's second graffiti class at the art school; she tags by the name of "Soul".

This is Carlie Schultz's second graffiti class at the art school; she tags by the name of "Soul".

Photo by Angela Carone

Sain practices his tag on a wall over and over again, to finesse his writing style.

Sain practices his tag on a wall over and over again, to finesse his writing style.

Photo by Angela Carone

Pose shows the students the flow and ease with which they must be able to tag their names on a wall.

Pose shows the students the flow and ease with which they must be able to tag their names on a wall.

Photo by Angela Carone

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