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Sonoran Desert Bald Eagle

Follow along as Arizona Game and Fish workers tend to baby bald eagles.

Kenneth Jacobson, eagle management coordinator for the Arizona Game and Fish, holds a 6-week-old nestling near Lake Mary in northern Arizona.

Kenneth Jacobson, eagle management coordinator for the Arizona Game and Fish, holds a 6-week-old nestling near Lake Mary in northern Arizona.

Kyle McCarty, bald eagle field projects coordinator for Arizona Game and Fish, contemplates a route up the tree to a bald eagle nest.

Kyle McCarty, bald eagle field projects coordinator for Arizona Game and Fish, contemplates a route up the tree to a bald eagle nest.

McCarty climbs a ponderosa pine tree near Lake Mary to check on a pair of bald eagle nestlings.

McCarty climbs a ponderosa pine tree near Lake Mary to check on a pair of bald eagle nestlings.

Mother eagle awaits anxiously as the biologists check on her young.

Mother eagle awaits anxiously as the biologists check on her young.

McCarty climbs into a bald eagle nest.

McCarty climbs into a bald eagle nest.

Kenneth Jacobson, eagle management coordinator for the Arizona Game and Fish, lowers a duffel bag with two nestlings carefully down to the ground.

Kenneth Jacobson, eagle management coordinator for the Arizona Game and Fish, lowers a duffel bag with two nestlings carefully down to the ground.

Jacobson gently removes one of the hooded nestlings to give it a health check up and band it.

Jacobson gently removes one of the hooded nestlings to give it a health check up and band it.

Jacobson holds a bald eagle nestling close.

Jacobson holds a bald eagle nestling close.

Cecelia Overby, biologist with the US Forest Service, holds the bird while Jacobson measures it.

Cecelia Overby, biologist with the US Forest Service, holds the bird while Jacobson measures it.

Jacobson measures a female nestling's beak. With the leather hood covering its eyes, the bird remains subdued.

Jacobson measures a female nestling's beak. With the leather hood covering its eyes, the bird remains subdued.

Jacobson weighs one of the two nestlings. Females are typically heavier than males.

Jacobson weighs one of the two nestlings. Females are typically heavier than males.

Jacobson spreads out a nestling's wing to take a blood sample.

Jacobson spreads out a nestling's wing to take a blood sample.

Reporter Laurel Morales holds the nestling briefly before biologists return the pair safely to their nest. Its heart beats rapidly and it smells like fish.

Reporter Laurel Morales holds the nestling briefly before biologists return the pair safely to their nest. Its heart beats rapidly and it smells like fish.

Photo by Alex Morales

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