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Ken Kramer

Celebrated TV personality and local icon, Ken Kramer joined KPBS in the late sixties.

Ken Kramer on assignment in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico in 1973.  A new highway in Baja California became the subject of a five-part series on NPR's "All Things Considered."  Ken traveled along the tourist road from one small town to the next in the Mercury Capri.

Ken Kramer on assignment in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico in 1973. A new highway in Baja California became the subject of a five-part series on NPR's "All Things Considered." Ken traveled along the tourist road from one small town to the next in the Mercury Capri.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer joined KPBS in 1969.

Ken Kramer joined KPBS in 1969.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer easily steps into hosting duties during the 1976 KPBS Auction.

Ken Kramer easily steps into hosting duties during the 1976 KPBS Auction.

Credit: KPBS file photo

During his stint at KPBS, Ken Kramer won several awards for his work in journalism, including this one in 1978 from the San Diego Press Club.  Pictured with Ken is Ed Bremer.

During his stint at KPBS, Ken Kramer won several awards for his work in journalism, including this one in 1978 from the San Diego Press Club. Pictured with Ken is Ed Bremer.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer adds Golden Mic Award winner to his list of accomplishments.

Ken Kramer adds Golden Mic Award winner to his list of accomplishments.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer always had a good time during KPBS Auction.

Ken Kramer always had a good time during KPBS Auction.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer headshot for KPBS in 1980.

Ken Kramer headshot for KPBS in 1980.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer during the 1982 KPBS Auction.

Ken Kramer during the 1982 KPBS Auction.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer with golden mic awards.

Ken Kramer with golden mic awards.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer as host of KPBS Auction, 1980.

Ken Kramer as host of KPBS Auction, 1980.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer in KPBS radio studios.

Ken Kramer in KPBS radio studios.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Ken Kramer, KPBS Host.  Early 80s.

Ken Kramer, KPBS Host. Early 80s.

Credit: KPBS file photo

Comments

Avatar for user 'SusanDanaLyng'

SusanDanaLyng | July 1, 2010 at 9:19 p.m. ― 5 years, 10 months ago

I have lived in San Diego all my life. My Mother, Grandmother and I all went to Sweetwater Highschool. So, I was floored to learn that the dunes on Coronado Beach just west of the Hotel Del spell the word Coronado from the sky. I was wondering if Ken Kramer's About San Diego could find out the who, what, where and when it was put there?

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Avatar for user 'MrFleet'

MrFleet | May 20, 2011 at 12:03 a.m. ― 4 years, 11 months ago

Hello my name is Justin Fleet

I am the Grandson of Reuben H Fleet, my grandfather bought Lindbergh Field in 1943 for a Million Dollars he owned and operated Consolidated aircraft. In 1971 my father Preston M Fleet payed the largest divorce settlement in San Diego and the country..so much money the lawyer's built a building in downtown San Diego. He also started Fotomat drive up windows and WD-40. He produced Casablanca and The man who would be King. Preston Fleet was responsible for the building of the Science center in Balboa Park and the Aviation Museum.He also donated the the Organs for the California Theater and Balboa Park Pavilion.Preston Fleet saw Imax at the worlds Fair in Paris and bought it for the Space Theater in Balboa Park. Reuben H. Fleet was also responsible for the sales of real estate that is now Point Loma.
My Grand Father employed 6-10 residents of San Diego during the War. His facility is now the Spa War building across from Old Town. My family had a major influence in the Development of San Diego..
My wife watches your show every week. I think its a crime to say that all consolidated did was make a car that you could take the wings off and drive around town. They are responsible for B-24 liberator bombers, PBY's Sea planes and many trainers. We are not a dot on the i of San Diego... are Family is the SAN in San Diego

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Avatar for user 'kinoptika'

kinoptika | July 28, 2011 at 9:16 p.m. ― 4 years, 9 months ago

Dear Mr. Kramer:

I wish to congratulate you on a job amazingly well done. I wish you the best in such a noble job of researching the history of San Diego.

I have a quick question... as a kid my parents [once] took us to a park where there was a wing. I always remembered this because as a child of no more than 6 years back in the early 70's seeing a wing that close was jaw dropping.

I've done some google searches and all I can come up with is that it may have been the Silverwing Park, but it looks quite small to what i remember it to be. I vaguely recollect it was hilly (many mounds, most probably). My google search brings me to few hits and a map of a very small place with what seems to be a baseball park.

Now, I have a few questions:

Why did this park hava an aircraft wing?
Whatever happened to it?
Did anything meaningful to San Diego ever happened here?

I don't wish to take more of your time, so I guess I'll leave it at that.

I appreciate any answer to my query... I'll be more than grateful if I see it on your show one day.

Best wishes and good luck

Alfonso M

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Avatar for user 'lbdtcurious'

lbdtcurious | August 14, 2011 at 12:48 p.m. ― 4 years, 8 months ago

Dear Mr. Kramer,

My husband and I recently moved to Albatross Street on the Hillcrest, Mission Hills border, south of University. One of the many reasons why we moved on this street is because of 2 lovely, landscaped islands - one is located on the 3800 block of the street (north of Robinson St.) and the other on the 3700 block (south of Robinson St.).

We know that the famous architect Irving Gill once resided on the street and built several of its houses. However, what we don't know is why this street has two islands (one on each end) with a turnabout. We haven't found similar islands in the surrounding neighborhood; however, we did find a very old wall built along the island on the 3800 block.

Can you possibly help us to uncover the hidden history of these very unique and lovely natural structures - an oasis in an increasingly urban area.

Thank you for all you have done to help us all rediscover San Diego.

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Avatar for user 'jjwick'

jjwick | September 29, 2011 at 9:13 p.m. ― 4 years, 7 months ago

Have you ever done a show about the olive industry in Fallbrook? It was the major industry until cheap products flooded in from Greece. I still have lots of trees on my property. We have a nice history museum barn in town.

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Avatar for user 'dsmith'

dsmith | November 27, 2011 at 12:37 p.m. ― 4 years, 5 months ago

Dear Mr. Kramer:

I have been reading a book by Barry Lynes about a scientist with San Diego ties. The person is Royal Roy Rife, who had his laboratory located in Point Loma. He invented a microscope able to magnifications up to 30,000x with only light sources. His goal was to locate what caused diseases and identify their basic form with his microscopes and then destroy them with vibrating wave lengths from another invention of his design.

I think this subject would be interesting to your viewers.

Thank you.

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Avatar for user 'DonDiego'

DonDiego | April 20, 2012 at 10:20 p.m. ― 4 years ago

Hi Mr. Kramer, first of all I love your show!! I was born in National City back in 1957 and can relate with alot of your stories but in every episode I learn so much. Thank you for the work and research you do. I have a good one for you, after watching about the old graveyard the Flinn family has, not far from there exists a small and unknown graveyard that I saw years ago while working for the Padre Dam Water District. There is a water storage tank at the end of Via Donito, in Alpine that just outside of the chain link fence, on the SW side of the water tank, there is a small area where there are a few grave markers dating back into the late 1800's...it has been over 20 years ago that I saw them but watching the Flinn graveyard brought them back to my mind. I wonder if you can find the story behind them as not too many people know that they exist. They are not on the PDWD property but withing 10 feet of the chain link fence surrounding them. I would be happy to show you the location. You can access the site without entering PDWD property.

Thanks again for your show!

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Avatar for user 'laurasd'

laurasd | June 29, 2012 at 1:13 p.m. ― 3 years, 10 months ago

Hello Mr. Kramer,
Your show is so interesting as I have lived in SD for 13 years and love to know the history of my adopted hometown! So I turn to you for help in my search for the 'best chile rellenos in SD".
My father lived here in 1963-1964 and then brought my siblings and I here for summer vacations in the late 1970's- 80's. We always ate at his favorite Mexican restaurant, The Old Town Tamale Factory on the north side of Old Town next to the little league field. I believe it sat for awhile after closing in the 80's , was a deli and now a Harley Davidson shop.
Would you happen to know if any of the owners or cooks went on to open any other Mexican restaurants here in town?.. Or the name of the family who owned it? My dad says the owner of Old Town Tamale Factory and owner of Pernicano's were friends and had a rivalry about growing the longest mustache in town. Old Town's chile relleno has become somewhat of a legend in our family as the BEST chile relleno ever. And my dad laments that he's never been able to find one like it, anywhere. I would LOVE to find one served here in SD(via someone who used to cook for or has family recipes from the Old Town Tamale Factory) for my dad, who is coming to visit for his 75th birthday this summer.
Please advise.
Thank you!
Laura Dowling Pham

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Avatar for user 'reubennm'

reubennm | August 10, 2012 at 3:45 p.m. ― 3 years, 8 months ago

I watched your episode on Fred Coleman of Julian recently and I believe you said no one knows what happened to him. I did a search on Ancestry.com and found he was still living in Julian according to the 1900 census. The voter registrations for the era gives a physical discription of him. He is not listed after the 1900 census so I suppose he either passed away or moved in with one of his children. He was born in 1829 in Kentucky. I would guess he is was buried somewhere near Julian. Reuben

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