skip to main content

Listen

Read

Watch

Schedules

Programs

Events

Give

Account

Donation Heart Ribbon

← Back to photo galleries

Makers: Women Who Make America

Review the story of how women have helped shape America over the last 50 years through one of the most sweeping social revolutions in our country’s history, in pursuit of their rights to a full and fair share of political power, economic opportunity and personal autonomy. The film is built from first-person, intimate accounts of women who experienced this time of change, including movement leaders such as author and feminist activist Gloria Steinem and Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton; opponents such as conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly; celebrities including media leader Oprah Winfrey and journalist Katie Couric; political figures such as U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; business leaders such as Linda Alvarado, president and CEO of Alvarado Construction, Inc., and a co-owner of The Colorado Rockies; and many “ordinary” women who confronted the dramatic social upheaval in their own lives.

Leaders of the Women’s Movement pass a torch that was carried by foot from New York to Houston, Texas, for the National Women’s Convention. Among the marchers, front, from left to right: tennis star Billie Jean King, in blue shirt and tan pants; former U.S. Congresswoman Bella Abzug, wearing her trademark hat; and feminist writer Betty Friedan, right, in red coat. November 1977.

Leaders of the Women’s Movement pass a torch that was carried by foot from New York to Houston, Texas, for the National Women’s Convention. Among the marchers, front, from left to right: tennis star Billie Jean King, in blue shirt and tan pants; former U.S. Congresswoman Bella Abzug, wearing her trademark hat; and feminist writer Betty Friedan, right, in red coat. November 1977.

Credit: Courtesy of AP Photo/Greg Smith

The March on Washington. Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963. The Women’s Movement was influenced in part by the Civil Rights Movement.

The March on Washington. Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963. The Women’s Movement was influenced in part by the Civil Rights Movement.

Credit: Courtesy of ©Leonard Freed/Magnum Photos

A young woman holds up a sign as she protests for women’s rights in front of the Federal Trade Commission headquarters during Richard Nixon’s inauguration weekend. Washington, D.C., January 18-21, 1969.

A young woman holds up a sign as she protests for women’s rights in front of the Federal Trade Commission headquarters during Richard Nixon’s inauguration weekend. Washington, D.C., January 18-21, 1969.

Credit: Courtesy of David Fenton/Getty Images

Demonstrators remove their brassieres during an anti-bra protest outside a San Francisco department store. August 1, 1969.

Demonstrators remove their brassieres during an anti-bra protest outside a San Francisco department store. August 1, 1969.

Credit: Courtesy of © Bettmann/CORBIS, © Corbis

Women marched through downtown St. Louis and visited the Mayor’s office as part of women’s liberation demonstration on the 15th anniversary of ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote. August 26, 1970.

Women marched through downtown St. Louis and visited the Mayor’s office as part of women’s liberation demonstration on the 15th anniversary of ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote. August 26, 1970.

Credit: Courtesy of Bettmann/Corbis/AP Images

Equal Rights Amendment supporters voice their disapproval of the 22-16 vote against the E.R.A. in the Florida Senate, June 21, 1982.

Equal Rights Amendment supporters voice their disapproval of the 22-16 vote against the E.R.A. in the Florida Senate, June 21, 1982.

Credit: Courtesy of AP Photo

Signs saying “Women Unite” carried by women supporters during a Women’s Liberation demonstration on Fifth Avenue and on Wall Street, 1970.

Signs saying “Women Unite” carried by women supporters during a Women’s Liberation demonstration on Fifth Avenue and on Wall Street, 1970.

Credit: Courtesy of John Olson, Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

Betty Friedan, co-founder of National Organization for Women (NOW), speaks during the Women’s Strike for Equality event in New York’s Central Park for the 50th Anniversary of woman suffrage, August 26, 1970.

Betty Friedan, co-founder of National Organization for Women (NOW), speaks during the Women’s Strike for Equality event in New York’s Central Park for the 50th Anniversary of woman suffrage, August 26, 1970.

Credit: Courtesy of AP Photo

Gloria Steinem, writer, lecturer, editor, and feminist activist. In 1972, she co-founded Ms. Magazine, which became a landmark institution for women's rights.

Gloria Steinem, writer, lecturer, editor, and feminist activist. In 1972, she co-founded Ms. Magazine, which became a landmark institution for women's rights.

Credit: Courtesy of Ms. Foundation

Gloria Steinem, iconic American feminist, and the popular face of the women’s movement.

Gloria Steinem, iconic American feminist, and the popular face of the women’s movement.

Credit: Courtesy of MAKERS

Ellen DeGeneres, first comedian to come out of the closet and represent homosexual relationships for mainstream television audiences, now daytime TV juggernaut.

Ellen DeGeneres, first comedian to come out of the closet and represent homosexual relationships for mainstream television audiences, now daytime TV juggernaut.

Credit: Courtesy of MAKERS

Faith Ringgold, celebrated artist and activist who fought to open museums to women artists and artist of color.

Faith Ringgold, celebrated artist and activist who fought to open museums to women artists and artist of color.

Credit: Courtesy of MAKERS

Hilary Clinton, first female major party presidential candidate, U.S. Secretary of State, as well as a pioneering and controversial former First Lady.

Hilary Clinton, first female major party presidential candidate, U.S. Secretary of State, as well as a pioneering and controversial former First Lady.

Credit: Courtesy of MAKERS

Kathrine Switzer, first woman to officially run in the once all-male Boston marathon, despite being attacked by a race official.

Kathrine Switzer, first woman to officially run in the once all-male Boston marathon, despite being attacked by a race official.

Credit: Courtesy of MAKERS

Katie Couric, first solo female anchor of a network evening news program.

Katie Couric, first solo female anchor of a network evening news program.

Credit: Courtesy of MAKERS

Linda Alvarado, founder and CEO of Alvarado Construction — one of the first female-led construction companies — and, as co-owner of the Colorado Rockies, first female owner of a major league baseball franchise.

Linda Alvarado, founder and CEO of Alvarado Construction — one of the first female-led construction companies — and, as co-owner of the Colorado Rockies, first female owner of a major league baseball franchise.

Credit: Courtesy of MAKERS

Michelle Rhee, former Chancellor of Washington, D.C., public schools who brought education reform to the national stage, now founder and CEO of non-profit advocacy group StudentsFirst.

Michelle Rhee, former Chancellor of Washington, D.C., public schools who brought education reform to the national stage, now founder and CEO of non-profit advocacy group StudentsFirst.

Credit: Courtesy of MAKERS

Ursula Burns, CEO of Xerox, and the first African-American woman to run a Fortune 500 company.

Ursula Burns, CEO of Xerox, and the first African-American woman to run a Fortune 500 company.

Credit: Courtesy of MAKERS