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Cabrillo National Monument

Photo of this place

Business hours

Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Wednesday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Climbing out of his boat and onto shore in 1542, Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo stepped into history as the first European to set foot on what is now the West Coast of the United States. In addition to telling the story of 16th century exploration, the park is home to a wealth of cultural and natural resources. Join us and embark on your own Voyage of Discovery.

Cabrillo National Monument lies at the tip of the Point Loma Peninsula, just west of the city of San Diego.

The drive to Cabrillo National Monument will take you through diverse areas that tell of the Point Loma peninsula’s history. In Spanish, “loma” means “hill,” and is a fitting description of the rolling topography of the area. Archaeological remnants tell of human occupation of the Point as far back as 7,000 years. In 1797, the Spanish constructed Fort Guijarros on the eastern side of the peninsula, as a means of guarding the entrance to the harbor. Fifty-five years later, in 1852, the southern portion of Point Loma was set aside as a military reservation.

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery was established in 1934 and today honors over 86,000 veterans and dependents who are interred there. Residential neighborhoods on Point Loma were originally established by generations of fishermen and remain varied today, with small cottages tucked next to multi-million dollar homes. Catalina Boulevard is part of San Diego’s 59-mile Scenic Drive, and affords spectacular panoramic views of the ocean and city on your way to Cabrillo National Monument.

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