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Special Coverage: Swine Flu

In-depth Reports & Expert Analysis

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Swine Flu Vaccine Shortage: Why?

Oct. 26, 2009 | By Richard Knox, NPR

Swine Flu Vaccine Shortage: Why?

Millions of Americans already have been infected with swine flu. Forty-six states have widespread flu, and the president has declared a national emergency. But only recently have U.S. health officials discovered why manufacturers can't deliver as much swine flue vaccine as expected.

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Public Health Officials Recommend Swine Flu Vaccine

Oct. 16, 2009 | By Hank Crook, Gloria Penner

San Diego County public health officials say the best way to prevent against getting infected with the H1N1 influenza virus is to get vaccinated. County officials made that announcement on Wednesday, following the news that a 5-year-old girl from Otay Mesa died from swine flu last week.

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A scientist cuts the end of a human saliva sample in a small-diameter glass tube during the analysis for a A(H1N1) virus, the influenza A(H1N1), commonly being referred to as 'swine flu', on August 14, 2009.

Above: A scientist cuts the end of a human saliva sample in a small-diameter glass tube during the analysis for a A(H1N1) virus, the influenza A(H1N1), commonly being referred to as 'swine flu', on August 14, 2009.

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Swine Flu 6 Months Later: Relief, But Winter Looms

Oct. 15, 2009 | By Mike Stobb, AP

Swine Flu 6 Months Later: Relief, But Winter Looms

It was six months ago that scientists discovered an ominous new flu virus, touching off fears of a catastrophic global outbreak that could cause people to drop dead in the streets. Doomsday, of course, never came to pass.

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What You Need To Know About Swine Flu Vaccine

Oct. 5, 2009 | By Richard Knox, NPR

What You Need To Know About Swine Flu Vaccine

The first doses of vaccine against swine flu — officially known as H1N1 of 2009 — will start arriving at hospitals, doctors' offices and clinics around the country this week. That's record time for a new vaccine — only a little more than five months after scientists discovered the now-pandemic virus.

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Marisa Grunder, 27 of Wilton, Iowa, is given a shot during trials of an H1N1 vaccine at the University of Iowa Health Center on August 11, 2009 in Iowa City, Iowa.

Above: Marisa Grunder, 27 of Wilton, Iowa, is given a shot during trials of an H1N1 vaccine at the University of Iowa Health Center on August 11, 2009 in Iowa City, Iowa.

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Swine Flu Update

The White house is predicting that the swine flu will affect 20 to 40 percent of all Americans - that's between 600,000 and 1.2 million people in San Diego County. These Days takes an updated look at how San Diego is preparing.

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90,000 in U.S. Could Die from H1N1 Virus this Flu Season

A recent report from the White House estimates that up to 90,000 Americans could die from the swine flu this flu season. The report also estimates that 2 million people could be hospitalized, and 20 to 40 percent of the population could be infected by the H1N1 influenza pandemic.

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Health Officials Working Feverishly to Control Swine Flu

Human cases of an outbreak of swine flu have been confirmed in the U.S., Mexico, Canada and Spain. Public health officials are trying to get a handle on the outbreak. We'll get a report of the latest news on the virus, and what people can do to keep themselves from contracting it.

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