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( COEnygaard )

Comments made by COEnygaard

Tijuana Photo Exhibit Sheds Light On Homeless Deportees

I have spoke personally with a number of displaced immigrants, and no they weren't homeless before moving north. They became homeless when released across the border. You may not care about this but the impact from the increase in homeless individuals on the border can cause impacts within America. For example they can become easy targets for organized crime to manipulate with drugs or money which lowers the risk for these organizations to operate.

April 16, 2014 at 11:23 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Deported Immigrant Activist Asks For US Asylum

Try following the citations within the text instead of debunking something with biased nonfactual based opinions.

March 22, 2014 at 9 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Deported Immigrant Activist Asks For US Asylum

MYTH:
Undocumented immigrants don't pay taxes.

FACT:
The U.S. Social Security Administration has estimated that three quarters of undocumented immigrants pay payroll taxes, and that they annually contribute $7 billion in Social Security funds that they will be unable to claim and 1.5 billion to Medicare. They also pay income taxes, and those who own homes pay property taxes -- as do renters, in the form of pass-throughs--that support education, healthcare, and other services.


MYTH:
Immigrants get healthcare for free, and are causing costs to skyrocket.

FACT:
According to research published n the American Journal of Public Health: 30 percent of immigrants use no health care at all during a year, most immigrants have health insurance; immigrant children had healthcare expenditures that were 74 percent lower than those for U.S. born children; and immigrants account for more than 10 percent of total health spending and 8 percent of government health spending. The researchers concluded: "Our study refutes assumption that immigrants represent a disproportionate financial burden on the U.S. health care system.


MYTH:
Undocumented workers worsen the budget deficit by taking services they never pay for.

FACT:
Immigrant workers actually save the country money. When they come to America, they typically go to work immediately. So they begin contributing to the economy almost instantly, without incurring the "upfront costs"--education, health care, unemployment compensation, etc--that might otherwise be incurred through age 18.


MYTH:
Undocumented workers take money out of Social Security without paying into it.

FACT:
It is estimated that more than $519 billion in earnings has been reported to Social Security on behalf of workers who will not be able to draw retirement from the system. Those contributions add up to about 10 percent of the system's total surplus. The Center for Urban Economic Development at the University of Illinois-Chicago estimates that undocumented workers generate between $6 billion and $7 billion annually in Social Security tax revenues. So without undocumented immigrants, the system would actually be in worse shape. And because they tend to be younger, and will thus be in the workforce longer, these workers will actually be helping to finance the retirement of Baby Boomers--whose numbers are expected to strain Social Security.

March 22, 2014 at 6:53 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Deported Immigrant Activist Asks For US Asylum

MYTH:
Immigrants drive down wages for American workers.

FACT:
Economic researchers have concluded that income inequality on the bottom half of the wage scale has not grown since the mid-1980s. While there has been a general decline in real wages for low-skilled workers, a senior economist for the Dallas Federal Reserve says studies show it is largely unaffected by immigrants. According to The New York Times: "There is scant evidence that illegal immigrants have caused any significant damage to the wages of American workers." The fact is that the real predictor of wage disparity is not whether someone is an immigrant-- regardless of status--or native born. It's education.


MYTH:
Immigrants only perform menial labor when they come to the United States.

FACT:
Pia Orrenius, a senior economist and immigration expert with the Dallas Federal Reserve, estimates that 40 percent of the nation's Ph.D. scientists and engineers were born in another country. Beyond that, foreign-born entrepreneurs have been behind 25 percent of all U.S. technology startups over the past 10 years, according to researches at Duke University. Finally, studies by the Migration Policy Institute show that 27 percent of new computer-software engineer are immigrants, and that one in five U.S. doctors are foreign born, as are two in five medical scientists; one in five computer specialists; one in six people in engineering or science occupations; one in four astronomers, physicists, chemical, and material scientists and one in six biological scientists.

MYTH:
Undocumented immigrants work almost exclusively in low-income jobs.

FACT:
Undocumented workers make up less than 10 percent of the 43 million low-wage workers in the United States, according to the Pew Hispanic Center.


MYTH:
Undocumented workers come from here to get free government services.

FACT:
Most come here to work. Of the estimated 11.5 to 12-million undocumented workers living in America, 7.5 million are employed, and undocumented men come here almost exclusively to work: Their labor force participation--96 percent--exceeds that of men who are legal immigrants or U.S. citizens ("Undocumented Immigrants: Facts and Figures," The Urban Institute). Moreover, undocumented immigrants are not eligible for welfare, food stamps, Medicaid, and most other forms of public assistance.


MYTH:
Undocumented workers are stealing low-wage jobs that Americans need.

FACT:
There's no evidence that immigrants have an impact on the employment outcomes of native-born workers who have low levels of education and are aged 25-34. In fact, there is evidence that immigrants actually create jobs. For example, the efforts of a single farm worker supports three jobs in the surrounding economy - equipment, processing, insurance, farm lending --that would otherwise disappear. (Republican U.S. Sen. George Voinovich of Ohio, cited in the Wall Street Journal)

March 22, 2014 at 6:50 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Deported Immigrant Activist Asks For US Asylum

MYTH:
Immigrants have a negative impact on the U.S. economy.

FACT:
Immigrants – documented and undocumented – have a net benefit to the nation's total economic output, raising it by a reported $21.5 billion per year (USA Today). And according to Business Week, undocumented immigrants have become an important source of growth for U.S. banks, insurers, credit card providers, and phone carriers.


MYTH:
Sending undocumented workers back to their native countries would have no real negative economic effect.

FACT:
The impact would actually be significant. Rice sociology professor Stephen Klineberg says, "America is totally dependent on the hard work and wages of these workers. They are critical to the economic success and well-being of America." The Pew Hispanic Center says industries that would be particularly affected are service (32 percent of workers are unauthorized); construction (19 percent), production-installation-repair (15 percent); sales and administrative support (12 percent); and management, business, and professional (10 percent).


MYTH:
Immigrants send everything they earn back to their country of origin.

FACT:
There's no question that immigrants do send some of their earnings back to family members. But there's also no question as to the importance of their buying power. Take Hispanics, for example. Hispanic buying power nationally has soared, according to the Pew Hispanic Center: It was $490 billion in 2000, $736 billion in 2005, and is estimated to reach $1.09 trillion in 2010 (or about 9.2 percent of all U.S. buying power). The trend in Texas is similar: Pew says Hispanic buying power was $87.4 billion in 2000, rose to $127.4 billion in 2005, and is expected to reach $188.7 billion in 2010.


MYTH:
Undocumented immigrants' use of public services is negatively affecting our economy.

FACT:
According to a study by the investment research company Standard & Poor's, the cost of providing services to undocumented immigrants is largely offset by the economic benefits they generate. Concludes one researcher: "From an economic standpoint, it's much ado about something very, very small, almost insignificant."

March 22, 2014 at 6:46 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Migrants Stage Second Protest At San Diego Border

"There is no way that illegals pay for themselves, let alone make my life better." - They pay for themselves the same way that you do. They purchase items within the United States and pay rent within the United States. There money gets cycled within the system just like yours.

"If they all stayed home, we would save billions. Maybe the price of tomatoes would go up a dime, but we would be ahead in the long run." - This makes no sense.

March 18, 2014 at 10:25 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Deported Immigrant Activist Asks For US Asylum

You should do some research into what problems they are referring to and why they believe there should be reform.

For example, immigrants who are not Mexican citizens but are of some Latin background are frequently walked into Tijuana city and left there. Increasing the level of homelessness etc within a city that is already dealing with poverty issues, or undocumented immigrants who are from Mexico that have been living within the USA for 20+ years are suddenly deported.

Illegal immigration is an issue, but the days of simply shipping them out does not always fall in line with what would be considered humane treatment.

I mean our country was literally built by immigrants, which could explain are closed eye attitude to the treatment of them when it comes to basic rights that have been guaranteed under our own development. Not all immigrants being deported entered illegally, and not all of them intended to stay.

I mean its easy to make a statement like "Maybe she should stop her activism towards illegal actions and go home to live in peace." but if you truly understood the problem you may think a little differently.

Not to mention that she has a U.S. born son, does her status actually warrant him being denied his rights as a citizen of the united states?

Why do you actually feel the way you do towards this kind of protesting anyways, what problems is it causing the united states to consider the pleas of these people?

March 18, 2014 at 10:14 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Migrants Stage Second Protest At San Diego Border

A lot of them do pay taxes, just because you don't have a social security number does not mean you are unable to pay taxes.

They do not necessarily come to America to have children, that is a very biased and one sided statement. Most are trying to improve their ability to have a decent life and if the system was more welcoming to this they would be fully placed in the system and pay for all the issues your stating. A lot of times they end up impregnated while already in the United States under B visas etc.

They are not felons for sneaking into America, only the second time is it considered a felony, If after deportation you again decide to sneak back into the United States of America then you will be considered a felon.

They would learn our language if we didn't corral, which we accomplish by holding this kind of aggressive thoughts towards them, them into communities filled only with undocumented immigrants or Latin Americans. Because of this business that caterers to their needs arise.

Lets look at the base problem though. The reason they come here is because employers hire them. American citizens hire undocumented immigrants illegally so that they, the company, can avoid paying taxes. With out this resource I doubt that these "illegals" would risk their life to cross the border for nothing. Or maybe if American companies doing business in Mexico, and other countries, paid the local people a livable wage then there would be no need to sneak into the united states. There is a huge ratio of workers in Tijuana and other Mexican states that work at American owned factories and get paid $55.00 or less per week. Factories that provide the medical supplies for you so that you can go to the hospital, parts for your cars so that you drive your Toyota, Ford, etc, factories that build the guns like colt, etc, so that you can defend your freedom.

With out Mexico and its citizens, America would be in a tough position to provide the lifestyle you are so accustomed too. But I guess they are just criminals who do not deserve a fair chance to improve their living standards to have a stable life for their family.

March 16, 2014 at 9:44 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Migrants Stage Second Protest At San Diego Border

A lot of these people are citizens, and the people that would be deported are their caretakers.

The importance of these protest is more complex then I believe you really understand. Some of these individuals are looking for the type of assistance that legally they are qualified for but because of the way we enforce these specific laws they do not get a fair opportunity to fight there case.

Its easy to look at the situation from a stance of "well they are getting what they deserve..". I am assuming that you would not leave your country to have children in another, but imagination that kind of separation. I know that if i was separated from my son I would protest everyday until I could be reunited, even if I wasn't completely correct in my approach.

Not to mention that protesting is a fundamental element of what it means to be American, even before we had our own sovereignty.

March 14, 2014 at 9:20 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

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